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Citizen
08-06-2011, 01:49 PM
I thought I was a savvy car owner, and as part of that, I often check my oil, coolant and tire pressure. Whenever I’m in the trunk, and the spare is uncovered for some reason, I sort of “push on the side wall of the spare to make sure it is still holding air. Remember that even unused tires can lose pressure too over time.

So the other day in my garage, when putting my car back together after having worked on a few things, I again pushed on the spare side wall. And this time I also pushed on the tread, and even sat on the tire. And yes, it felt firm each time. But for some reason, I then just decided to use the pressure gauge to see what it had.

Guess what…it didn’t even register! That’s right, that tire would have been flat if I had needed it on my car. The DeLorean spare tire is a little thing, so I guess it must feel firm to the touch even without any air pressure.

Word to the wise—CHECK YOUR SPARE TIRE PRESSURE!

Obviously I filled it up, and from now on will check it with the pressure gauge before each trip.

Thomas

thruxton
08-06-2011, 02:27 PM
is it the original spare? rubber gets hard over time.
i replaced my spare two years ago with one off a pt cruiser.

Citizen
08-06-2011, 02:35 PM
It's the original tire, best as I can tell. Appears to be in perfect condition. Probably never used. You're right, that' probably why the rubber felt firm.

...

Roman Legion
08-06-2011, 03:32 PM
I don't even know how to check tire pressure.. :\

Kevin
08-06-2011, 03:53 PM
Yes definitely don't rely on the original spare tire, Ozzie wrote a good post on his blog about finding alternative tires:

http://delorean2109.blogspot.com/2008/10/modernizing-your-spare-tire-minimizing.html

sdg3205
08-06-2011, 04:13 PM
Has anyone ever put a tube in?

Ozzie
08-06-2011, 04:14 PM
Thanks for the prop, Kevin.

I am though, just as guilty as Thomas and his post about not checking the spare's air pressure often enough. ...but in my very weak and feeble defense, I must say that I have an additional obstacle. See, I have one of those cool strut bars installed, so for me to get to the spare to check it, I have to unbolt the strut bar (yeah, I know: lazy). So instead of doing so I choose the path of least resistance and most laziness, and don't check it.

You know what would be cool though? If I (and those of us w/strut bars) had a 3 or 4 foot air hose that were to screw into the spare's stem, and be accessible for checking the air and even filling at the other end, w/o having to remove the strut bar (oh, and anything else in the bonnet).

When I remember to do so, I have looked for such a hose but haven't found one yet. If any one sees one, please drop me a note, or posting.

jmettee
08-06-2011, 04:43 PM
While you're checking the spare in your DMC, go out & also check the air in your daily driver spares. I bet you'll be surprised to find they are likely a little low too if the car is over 2 years old & you've never checked it.

I check our spare in the daily drivers once a year.

EdR5150
08-06-2011, 06:37 PM
If you going to rely on your spare, you better get the rubber replaced. Otherwise it's dead weight. I remember reading that someone tried to use their spare, and the rubber came right off the rim. I replaced my rubber for around $33: http://www.16908.info/?p=1136

Dangermouse
08-07-2011, 12:42 AM
While you're checking the spare in your DMC, go out & also check the air in your daily driver spares. I bet you'll be surprised to find they are likely a little low too if the car is over 2 years old & you've never checked it.

I check our spare in the daily drivers once a year.

The spare in my '10 Grand Caravan is under the car beneath the driver's and passenger seat! I have no idea if it is space saver or full size. I don't even know if it is even there. I need to get it on a lift just to check the pressure!

jmettee
08-07-2011, 11:16 AM
I need to get it on a lift just to check the pressure!

I should hope not! If so, how do you get the spare out when you have a flat along the road? :sad30: If it's like a pickup truck, there is a crank somewhere that lowers the tire via a suspension cable on a winch. For a van, it's likely a full-size, but you never really know until you look at it. As far as I know, donuts are only used on smaller cars.

Canon20DFan
08-07-2011, 11:24 AM
I have a new spare on my Delorean, but admit I don't check the pressure like I should. I'll do that today. When I do put air in the spare, I fill it right to the max tire pressure as I assume the air will leak over time, even in a good tire.

Dangermouse
08-07-2011, 12:26 PM
I should hope not! If so, how do you get the spare out when you have a flat along the road? :sad30: If it's like a pickup truck, there is a crank somewhere that lowers the tire via a suspension cable on a winch. For a van, it's likely a full-size, but you never really know until you look at it. As far as I know, donuts are only used on smaller cars.


Per the users manual, there is a bolt head under a cover, under the center storage unit. Turning this bolt with the supplied wrench will lower the wheel to the ground, of course still under the middle of the van. The tool kit comes with a shepards-crook-type device that you use to grab the wheel and pull it out from under the car.

How you get it back in it's storage position isn't clear.

Perhaps if I drove the van onto a set of ramps I could get under it enough to check the air, but undoubtedly the valve would be pointed upwards and would be unreachable :)

With a truck like my old Explorer, the spare wheel is right at the rear of the vehicle and is fairly accessible, even in it's stored position mainly due to the higher ground clearance. In the van, this space is used up by the area where the swanky "stow-and-go" seats fit when they are stowed, for both rear and middle rows. Hence the only space is under the front row.

Citizen
09-02-2011, 08:59 PM
EPILOG.

I took the spare to Discount Tire, off the south loop in Houston. Since it wouldn’t hold air, but had no damage, I though it only needed to have the walls re-sealed. But the man said they can’t touch it, as that would be a safety violation. He’d have to order me a new one. When asked how much, he said about $300, ‘cause it’s a special order.

So I walked out disappointed, and thinking I’d buy one for a ricer off eBay for about #25 bucks.

But on a whim, I took the tire to another Discount Tire. And the guy there said let me take a look at it, and then “yeah, we can fix it, no problem”. They re-sealed it, aired it up to like 60 lbs, and wheeled it out to my car for me. I said wait, I haven’t paid for it yet. But the guy said, that’s okay, we fix flats for free. The guy even offered to put the tire in a bag, so it wouldn’t mess up the trunk.

I couldn’t believe it. I said how can you do that? He said we just want your business when you need new tires for your car. So I thanked him profusely, promised to come in when I needed 4 new tires, and tipped him generously.

Now I have a good spare again!

Dangermouse
09-02-2011, 09:18 PM
Awesome. It's often true that it is the people that make a successful company.

Canon20DFan
09-04-2011, 07:52 PM
RV places have air hose extensions for dualie vehicles - it's the only way to fill the inside tire without removing the outer rim.

Thanks for the prop, Kevin.

I am though, just as guilty as Thomas and his post about not checking the spare's air pressure often enough. ...but in my very weak and feeble defense, I must say that I have an additional obstacle. See, I have one of those cool strut bars installed, so for me to get to the spare to check it, I have to unbolt the strut bar (yeah, I know: lazy). So instead of doing so I choose the path of least resistance and most laziness, and don't check it.

You know what would be cool though? If I (and those of us w/strut bars) had a 3 or 4 foot air hose that were to screw into the spare's stem, and be accessible for checking the air and even filling at the other end, w/o having to remove the strut bar (oh, and anything else in the bonnet).

When I remember to do so, I have looked for such a hose but haven't found one yet. If any one sees one, please drop me a note, or posting.

Ozzie
09-04-2011, 07:57 PM
...may have found it, at good ole' Grainger:

Extension Hose, Air, 36 In Length (3http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/CHERNE-INDUSTRIES-Extension-Hose-3NVY5?cm_sp=IO-_-IDP-_-BTM_VTV70300505&cm_vc=IDPBBZ2) $20.29

Extension Hose, Air, 36 In Length (http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/CHERNE-INDUSTRIES-Extension-Hose-1VNH4) $14.36

content22207
09-04-2011, 09:20 PM
RV places have air hose extensions for dualie vehicles - it's the only way to fill the inside tire without removing the outer rim.

Nonsense. All you need is a standard two sided air chuck. On dual rear axles, the outer rim is 100% identical to the inner rim (and the front rim), just turned around backwards. It's the same for pickup trucks or tractor trailers. The outer valve stem points away from you, the inner stem points towards you. You don't need to remove anything.

Bill Robertson
#5939

My DeLorean spare tire is a 50,000 mile steel belted radial. I could drive home from California on it if necessary. I did drive all over the DC area after FFT'09 trying to find an in stock 235 60/15 tire to replace a sliced sidewall, at least 30 miles at speeds up to 45 MPH. I couldn't tell any difference in vehicle handling with it on the rear. My spare is the same diameter as a donut but twice as wide.

Bill Robertson
#5939

Canon20DFan
09-05-2011, 11:30 AM
The links and ordering page doesn't work. I've had similar hoses on my Class C RV, I'll swing by the local auto place and get one today.

...may have found it, at good ole' Grainger:

Extension Hose, Air, 36 In Length (3http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/CHERNE-INDUSTRIES-Extension-Hose-3NVY5?cm_sp=IO-_-IDP-_-BTM_VTV70300505&cm_vc=IDPBBZ2) $20.29

Extension Hose, Air, 36 In Length (http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/CHERNE-INDUSTRIES-Extension-Hose-1VNH4) $14.36

Ozzie
09-05-2011, 12:08 PM
Weird. Oh, ok, I did find an errant letter or two in the first link, but 2nd seems to work well. I've updated them below, along with the Grainger Item number, so you/anyone can search for reference. I'm thinking of ordering one for my daily as well.

Grainger Item #: 3NVY5
Extension Hose, Air, 36 In Length (http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/CHERNE-INDUSTRIES-Extension-Hose-3NVY5?cm_sp=IO-_-IDP-_-BTM_VTV70300505&cm_vc=IDPBBZ2) $14.36

Grainger Item #: 1VNH4
Extension Hose, Air, 60 In Length (http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/CHERNE-INDUSTRIES-Extension-Hose-1VNH4) $20.29

content22207
09-05-2011, 02:02 PM
You all are making this much more complicated than it needs to be:

4859 4860

Bill Robertson
#5939