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DMCH James
07-19-2017, 04:48 PM
DeLorean Motor Company has identified an issue that affects some of the 107000 Fuel Pump/Sender Module that could allow the fuel pump to continue running if the inertia switch is “tripped”. Today we are sending a letter to all purchasers of record of the 107000 Fuel Pump/Sender Module with instructions on how to quickly and easily test the unit and make a minor modification to correct this issue if required.

DMC Texas, DMC California, DMC Midwest, DMC Florida (Orlando) and DMC Northwest have all supplied us with lists of purchasers to whom we have sent these letters. Gulf Coast Motorworks (formerly DMC Florida in Bonita Springs, Florida) and DeLorean Europe (formerly DMC Europe in The Netherlands) have been unwilling or unable to supply us with the names of the customers who have purchased directly from either of those two locations, though we have supplied them with the same information and asked that they forward it on to their customers.

Some of the cars that these were installed into have undoubtedly been sold or otherwise changed hands. Follow this link to download the contents of the letter mentioned above. https://www.delorean.com/pdf/DELOREAN-Fuel-Module-Controller-Bulletin.pdf

Contact DMC (Texas) at 800/872-3621 or 1-281-441-2537 with any questions.

DavidProehl
07-19-2017, 07:36 PM
For what its worth, I'm still loving my pump/sender combo. I'm over 2 years in with it and have had no issues! Previously I had fuel pump issues at least once a year.

Christian Dietrich
07-20-2017, 06:19 AM
Mine has been in for over a year and i still love it. No issues and light years away from the original design. Im sure DMC-H will have it all figured out. No big deal! 😁

Sent from my SM-N920P using Tapatalk

Christian Dietrich
07-20-2017, 06:21 AM
Btw thanls for catching this and letting us know James. Keep up the good work!

Sent from my SM-N920P using Tapatalk

jawn101
07-23-2017, 10:56 PM
This is really interesting. During some unrelated testing a few weeks back I discovered that my inertia switch didn't stop the fuel pump. I was wondering why but just assumed the switch was internally failed or something and didn't get back around to investigating further. Now I guess I know.

James - is it possible to remove the pin from the connector rather than cutting the wire? That seems awfully...irreversible to me.

DMCMW Dave
07-24-2017, 12:11 AM
James - is it possible to remove the pin from the connector rather than cutting the wire? That seems awfully...irreversible to me.

You could just extract the pin and tape it off, but I can't imagine why you'd ever want to reverse this. Cut the wire on the pump side as shown and you haven't damaged anything that was "original" to the car, i.e. the original car side of the harness.

jawn101
08-04-2017, 02:14 PM
Did the mod today. Easy as everyone said, but the implementation isn't exactly perfect. When tripping the inertia switch there is now no ground to the fuel gage, so it pegs vertically. Theoretically you should never see this happen, and if it does you probably have bigger problems. Seems that the original wiring schematic had grounds independently for the fuel sender and pump (makes sense as there was no single unit controlling them before) and the upgraded logic unit must have mistakenly used a shared ground internally for them both. So now when you interrupt the only remaining ground via the inertia switch, the sender circuit goes offline too.

Ras12
08-04-2017, 09:30 PM
This may be a stupid question but assuming you keep everything they way it is (i.e. factory plug) and do not change the connector is the only implication that the inertia switch will not work and the fuel pump will still have power? I thought most modern cars today do not have inertia switches, is that true? If so, what is the big deal with not having one (i.e. not changing the plug or jumping it). Don't want to sound like someone who isn't interested in safety but just curious as to both sides of story. Also, when does the inertia switch engage? Front, side, rear impacts? Rollovers only? Again, just trying to be more educated about them.

OZ DMC
08-05-2017, 01:20 AM
Did the mod today. Easy as everyone said, but the implementation isn't exactly perfect. When tripping the inertia switch there is now no ground to the fuel gage, so it pegs vertically. Theoretically you should never see this happen, and if it does you probably have bigger problems. Seems that the original wiring schematic had grounds independently for the fuel sender and pump (makes sense as there was no single unit controlling them before) and the upgraded logic unit must have mistakenly used a shared ground internally for them both. So now when you interrupt the only remaining ground via the inertia switch, the sender circuit goes offline too.

My car needed the fix so did mine yesterday. 2065 is back roaming the streets of country NSW:thumbup:

Citizen
08-05-2017, 07:37 AM
My car needed the fix so did mine yesterday. 2065 is back roaming the streets of country NSW:thumbup:

My car needed the fix too so I did mine yesterday as well. 3341 is back roaming the streets of Texas.

A side note: The new combo-unit works great, but since installing it, I've always had the problem of the fuel pump access panel not fitting back on correctly. Anyone else have that problem? I've tried a few adjustments, but still it doesn't fit right, so I've just been living with it.

Thomas

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FABombjoy
08-05-2017, 08:46 AM
A side note: The new combo-unit works great, but since installing it, I've always had the problem of the fuel pump access panel not fitting back on correctly. Anyone else have that problem? I've tried a few adjustments, but still it doesn't fit right, so I've just been living with it.
Yes, I filed down both the pump wiring plug and the backside of the cover. It took some doing but now it sits where it should.

Rich
08-05-2017, 10:50 AM
....assuming you keep everything they way it is (i.e. factory plug) and do not change the connector is the only implication that the inertia switch will not work and the fuel pump will still have power? I thought most modern cars today do not have inertia switches, is that true? If so, what is the big deal with not having one (i.e. not changing the plug or jumping it). Don't want to sound like someone who isn't interested in safety but just curious as to both sides of story. Also, when does the inertia switch engage? Front, side, rear impacts? Rollovers only? Again, just trying to be more educated about them.

The fuel pump inertia switch is a common safety feature of fuel-injected cars of the era. It opens the ground circuit of the fuel pump in the event of a significant side/front/rear impact or a rollover. That way the fire hazard due to any accidental breach of the pressure-side of the fuel system, even with the ignition still ON, is minimized because the fuel pump can't run.

On more modern cars the same function is achieved by using the impact sensor that triggers the SRS airbags so no need for a dedicated fuel-safety inertia switch. Therefore these cars have the same post-accident fuel-safety shutoff feature as a DeLorean. The fuel pump relay gets disabled when there's an impact signal sent to the airbag system. As you know, the DeLorean is a pre-airbag car.

So it's very important to know that the inertia switch/circuit in good working order, no two ways about it. Thanks for asking.

jawn101
08-07-2017, 11:17 AM
My car needed the fix too so I did mine yesterday as well. 3341 is back roaming the streets of Texas.

A side note: The new combo-unit works great, but since installing it, I've always had the problem of the fuel pump access panel not fitting back on correctly. Anyone else have that problem? I've tried a few adjustments, but still it doesn't fit right, so I've just been living with it.

Thomas

...


Yes, I filed down both the pump wiring plug and the backside of the cover. It took some doing but now it sits where it should.

This shouldn't be necessary, if you follow the guidance in the installation guide for proper positioning of the pump itself (rotated so the plugs are towards the back) and strap the logic unit to the filler neck off to the side. Never had any issue with my panel fitting in place properly after the upgrade. And I've had to remove/reinstall it about two dozen times for various issues with this unit... sigh.

FABombjoy
08-07-2017, 11:58 AM
This shouldn't be necessary, if you follow the guidance in the installation guide for proper positioning of the pump itself (rotated so the plugs are towards the back)
Yes, I did very thoroughly read the directions and spent quite some time trying to degree in the pump and eliminate the interference problem. Doing so in such a manner that the fuel lines were not kinked or restricted in any way was simply not going to happen without modification.

I just chalked it up to variances in the frame, underbody, access panel, fuel tank, etc.

Ron
08-07-2017, 07:32 PM
I just chalked it up to variances in the frame, underbody, access panel, fuel tank, etc.

Yep!
A lot of cars have problems with that pump interfering with the access panel. Dave said he guessed about 1 in 10, IIRC. Some barely rub, some (like mine) just will not go. I used a heat gun on the panel...

Patrick C
08-08-2017, 08:45 AM
Yep!
A lot of cars have problems with that pump interfering with the access panel. Dave said he guessed about 1 in 10, IIRC. Some barely rub, some (like mine) just will not go. I used a heat gun on the panel...

I'm guessing a lot of it is the positioning of the gas tank in the frame. If the tank sits lower, the pump won't interfere with the panel.

Citizen
08-08-2017, 06:50 PM
... if you follow the guidance in the installation guide for proper positioning of the pump itself (rotated so the plugs are towards the back) and strap the logic unit to the filler neck off to the side. Never had any issue with my panel fitting in place properly after the upgrade. And I've had to remove/reinstall it about two dozen times for various issues with this unit... sigh.


I'm guessing a lot of it is the positioning of the gas tank in the frame. If the tank sits lower, the pump won't interfere with the panel.


Yes, I did very thoroughly read the directions and spent quite some time trying to degree in the pump and eliminate the interference problem. Doing so in such a manner that the fuel lines were not kinked or restricted in any way was simply not going to happen without modification.

I just chalked it up to variances in the frame, underbody, access panel, fuel tank, etc.

I too was pretty thorough trying to make it fit, taking into account the directions, rotation of the pump, and tying the logic unit to the filler neck. Nothing worked. I have not yet tried anything more drastic, like modifying the unit or the cover, but I may have to.

Thomas

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