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CyberBill
05-13-2020, 12:10 AM
I thought this would be a fun adventure to document my DeLorean project. I found the car, VIN 5510, on Craigslist doing my normal weekly search. It was listed for $19,500 firm, and looked really really great. I contacted the seller, went back and forth, and due to the COVID-19 situation going on, I bought the car without even sitting in it. I got a lot of pictures and videos, and was able to stalk the owner enough to know they were real. On 4/20/2020 we signed the bill of sale, on 5/4/2020 the car was picked up and put in an enclosed trailer and shipped over 3,000 miles from roughly Boston to Seattle. Cost was $1,450 for the trip, and the car arrived on Saturday 5/9/2020 in the morning.

63677

She looks beautiful!! I wash her off, blow off some leaves, do a quick drive around the block, and realize that - in addition to the automatic transmission slipping under load - the cars brakes are completely unassisted, which means I have to use both feet to push the brake to stop. I also haven't driven a manual steering car this millennia. Also, this is the first time I have ever touched a Delorean, sat in one, or driven one.

Before moving on, let's take a quick note of the car's current condition. The car's body is great, there is a little ding in the T panel, a small dent in the left rear quarter panel, and a nearly invisible ding on the right front fender flair. Doors hold open, but gas struts may be a bit weak. Driver's side door rubs on the T panel when fully open. All the plastic bits are great, the vinyl decal stripes are good. The 'D' metal insert from the bumper is sitting on the center console.

The interior is decent - lots and lots of little issues, though. Seats need to be recovered, binnacle leather is ripped, steering wheel leather is ripped. Door sliders are rusty, and thus the carpet is rusty. Door cards don't seem to fit well, lots of gaps, the panel on the driver's door with the handle doesn't stay. None of the lights seem to be working on the interior, but that might be me not knowing how they work. All of the seals on the doors are terrible, brittle, and falling apart. The steering wheel shakes around when you steer.

The driver's door-closed sensor is bad, and also falling out. The parking brake sensor is sketchy. Speedometer hits ~22 and stops going higher. Tach seems to be working, oil pressure and gas gauge work. Battery voltage looks good, same with temp.

The gas strut that holds the sunshade is weak on the left side, but still holds fine, and the engine cover latch works well. The engine looks, for it's age, really nice. Fuel lines have all been upgraded to braided stainless steel. There is basically no visible rust anywhere in the engine compartment. The exhaust looks to be new, the asbestos panels have been replaced. The engine starts up perfectly and quickly every single time. Under the car, it's leaking. Definitely leaking red transmission fluid and some kind of black oil from a few inches rear of the transmission fluid, so I think it may be the final drive oil or perhaps the rear main seal.

Under the hood, the rubber gasket looks like it was replaced but didn't quite stick in some areas. Otherwise it looks nice, a few rust spots. Spare tire is there and in good shape. The jack is in the little cubby. Carpet and thin wood panel thing are there and in good condition, though there is evidence is moisture on the wood.

The tires look fine and have some tread left, wheels look good. Suspension feels a little rough and hard, but not terrible. Brake pads and calipers look a bit rusty, along with the rotors where the pads can't rub them clean. I'll need to do a closer inspection on suspension and brakes later.

Phew, that was a lot....

CyberBill
05-13-2020, 12:19 AM
[Mostly copied from my "What did you do the DeLorean today?" post]

A few days before the car shipped, the seller had the hood release cable snap. He ordered a new cable but didn't have time to replace it, so that was my first task yesterday [5/9/2020]. He was able to rig up a backup line and put some vice grips on the broken release handle, so I was able to get into the hood. Took about 30 minutes or so to install, which I did record because I couldn't find a video of anyone doing the procedure. I may post that at some point in the future if the footage is good enough. Hardest part was getting the cable to snake over top of all the stuff under the dash, the rest is just a cotter pin and a couple of retaining nuts.

Now back to the brakes... My brake pedal feels soft until it goes a little down, and then is very hard to push. Whether the car is running or not, the pedal doesn't feel different at all. After watching a few hours of YouTube videos and some threads here on the brake system, I felt that the brake booster/servo was likely not functioning. I pulled the vacuum line off of the booster and it has no vacuum. So, effectively I'm running with manual non-assisted brakes, which explains why I need to use both feet to stop.

On the engine I found the vacuum line that splits into a T, and I took that apart and verified that when the car is running there is a very nice suction pressure there (and when it is not connected the car runs terribly). I hooked up the T, connected the end that goes to the vacuum tank, and verified that I still had good suction. This pretty much tells me that there is something wrong on the vacuum line that runs from the engine to the booster. I hooked up my air compressor to the line at the booster, used vice grips to close the line near the engine, and pumped some air into it - which did not hold. I set the air compressor to like 20-30 psi, and then started trying to hear and feel for air leaking. A quick walk around pointed me to the rear right - I took off the rear right wheel, jacked up the car, and crawled under. Unfortunately, it isn't good news. The line seems to be leaking all of the air from the hard line, somewhere above the frame on the passenger side, just above the transmission, near where the trailing arms attach. I don't think there is any way I can get to it without dropping the frame.

For a temporary fix, I ran to Lowes' and for $25 picked up 3/8", 20' coiled copper tube. I had to cut the hoses off the ends of the hardline, since they were so corroded that they wouldn't move. I run the tube under the car, zip tying it along the way, roughly following the original path - but now under the frame rather than on top of it. I used hose clamps on each end to connect it to the rubber vacuum lines. The whole process probably took me 1 1/2 - 2 hours. The vacuum is holding perfectly, and the brakes actually work now!! I don't have to sue both feet to stop from 10 miles per hour!!

Domi
05-13-2020, 07:16 AM
Congratulation on your purchase :)
Can't wait to see more picture of it ;)

cdrusn
05-18-2020, 03:59 PM
It might seem like a monumental task to take care of all these issues but for the price you paid I would say you will come out ahead and with a lot
of new working parts and interior when you are done. You didn't say whether you checked the fluid level in the transmission but given the leaked fluid
you saw under the car that could be the problem and you won't have to rebuild the transmission just the seals. It's a fairly easy job to pick up the body
from the frame to put a real fix in for the brake vacuum line. While the body is up I would also replace the a/c hoses. :race:

CyberBill
05-18-2020, 05:49 PM
It might seem like a monumental task to take care of all these issues but for the price you paid I would say you will come out ahead and with a lot
of new working parts and interior when you are done. You didn't say whether you checked the fluid level in the transmission but given the leaked fluid
you saw under the car that could be the problem and you won't have to rebuild the transmission just the seals. It's a fairly easy job to pick up the body
from the frame to put a real fix in for the brake vacuum line. While the body is up I would also replace the a/c hoses. :race:

I didn't check the transmission fluid - probably should have... The transmission was slipping for the previous owner, and he redid the fluid and replaced the filter. Honestly on the drive I did on Saturday - about 10 miles - I only had it slip once as I was going up a hill. Basically anytime I give it a lot of throttle or there is extra load, the transmission slips.

When you say 'pretty easy to pick up the body from the frame'... How easy? I have skimmed through the process a bit, looks like I have to disconnect all the wiring in the back, take the bumpers off (just rear?), and probably disconnect the brakes and steering up front... The process of raising the frame up looks pretty straight forward once everything is disconnected. But yes - I will absolutely do a real fix for the brake line ASAP.

Do you suggest that I replace any other hoses or anything that are otherwise inaccessible? I'd rather do it once and be done!

CyberBill
05-19-2020, 12:02 AM
One thing I want to do with my build log here is keep very good track of every dollar spent on the car... So, today I spent a whole lot money. lol

I was able to get the car's title changed over, get it registered, and get license plates. That cost me $2,453! Most of that was the use tax (sales tax) - in WA it is pretty expensive. I decided if I was going to spend money today, might as well buy some stuff!!

Since I've got the replacement transmission sitting here, I cleaned it up and took off the bell housing because it was cracked in shipment. After closer inspection, I decided not to weld it because the broken piece wasn't near any threads, and there is already a casted-in hole (inspection hole?). I wish I would have realized that prior to taking the housing off the transmission, because now I have to replace the seal and a bunch of transmission fluid and diff fluid spilled out. Most of the purchases are transmission related:

First, my Amazon order, $260

High temp gasket material (the original gasket isn't available individually, and the kit is $150+)
High temp RTV gasket maker
10mm Square male drain plug socket
Socket set that includes 10mm square female drive
O-ring kit
Stainless steel hose clamp kit
4 quarts of Red Line MT-90 (final drive oil) - enough for 2 changes
3 gallons of Castrol Dexron III (auto transmission fluid) - enough for 2 changes


And then my DeLorean Go order, $854

Delrin Steering Column Bushing
Upgraded M10 driveshaft bolts
Automatic Transmission Filter
Automatic Transmission gasket & rebuild kit
Crush washers for drain bolts


This purchase list is enough for me to install the replacement transmission, rebuild the existing transmission out of the car, and reinstall it. That will leave me with a perfectly good and matched engine/transmission, and another transmission I can sell. Hoping that I didn't forget anything! Also.. probably going to have to pull the trigger on a 3d printer soon, so I can make all the tools to disassemble the transmission fully.

Aside from these items, 5510 is currently residing at Delorean Service Northwest for a full technical inspection. So far it looks like the hose leading to the fuel accumulator has split (pretty common, from what I can gather), the brakes look bad, and its idling higher than it should.

CyberBill
05-22-2020, 01:36 AM
[This section is as posted in the "What have you done to your DeLorean today?" post]

Got some bad news from Toby at Delorean Service Northwest - looks like 5510 needs a new frame, or some extensive frame repair. Still trying to decide whether to bring it home, pull the body off the frame, and go to work on a full frame restoration... If anyone has thoughts on the subject, I'd love to hear it! The Stainless Steel frame is out of my budget. Tips on what work to do at the same time, how to approach it, materials to use, etc. Someone had recommended replacing the coolant lines? Maybe rebuild the suspension? If it makes a difference, my father is a professional welder with 30+ years of experience and would likely be able to do the welding for me if I handle ripping it apart and cutting out the bad stuff. He lives ~1700 miles away, so I would have to prep everything for him to do over a few days or a week, then I'd wrap it up by POR-15'ing the whole thing.

Prior to getting the news about the frame, I also ordered a complete brake rebuild kit. New rotors, pads, seals, caliper pistons, hoses, etc. I think I'm going to pick up a full set of stainless steel brake lines as well, since the brake vacuum line is toast and the body is coming off anyway. This would mean replacing everything in the brake system except the booster, master cylinder, and calipers.

In non-Delorean news, I sold my Honda CR-Z. I now have ample funds and room in the garage to work!

Amazon: $123

Oil/fuel drain pan & funnels
Silicone Brake Parts lubricant
Wheel chocks
Castrol DOT4 brake fluid (3x 12oz - enough for a full replacement, I think)
Thread locker
Disk brake compressor
Brake cleaner
Copper anti-seize


Delorean Go: $699

Front & rear rotors
Front & rear pads
Front & rear rebuild kits
Front & rear caliper pistons
Front & rear brake hoses
Misc brake hardware (retaining clips, pins, shims)

mhanch
05-22-2020, 11:44 AM
Have you joined PNDC (http://www.pndc.org/)yet? Looking forward to seeing your build over time!

CyberBill
05-22-2020, 01:27 PM
Have you joined PNDC (http://www.pndc.org/)yet? Looking forward to seeing your build over time!

Not yet, I have the signup form sitting on my desk right now - signed and ready to go, just haven't sent it in. :)

CyberBill
05-27-2020, 03:11 AM
Successfully separated the body from the frame on Saturday (May 23th, 2020). My brother-in-law Joe came to help, thankfully. No way it would have happened in one day (roughly 10 hours) without him. We did the poor man's lift using 16"x8"x4" and 16"x8"x8" cinder blocks, along with some jack stands and two floor jacks.

My entire body is aching, every muscle feels like its pulled, and after we finished my entire body was covered with dirt... but... there's now a DeLorean body sitting on two furniture dollies and 4x4's, and a DeLorean frame sitting on 4 wheel dollies.

We started with the checklist here: http://dmctalk.org/showthread.php?14602-How-To-Body-and-Frame-Separation-Checklist - It gave us a HUGE boost. I've now replied to that thread to add some additional details for anyone else making the plunge, but honestly it was pretty straight forward, just a lot of hard work. Concrete blocks are really heavy!

63799

Since then, I took a couple or days off, and tonight (Tuesday, May 26th, 2020) I finally went out and cleaned up. Got all the tools back organized, swept up as best I could, and also took the time to drain as much of the fuel out of the tank I could and transfer it into our daily driver. I had pretty much filled up right before taking the car into the shop. I also took some time to start scraping on the frame and find some rust spots, and also investigating one of the main reasons I took the body off - the brake booster vacuum line and fuel return line. Here's how it looks:

63798

Not good. There is literally nothing left of the vacuum tube, it fell apart as I picked it up. The fuel line is still in-tact, but the rusty area smells strongly of gas, so that's definitely the source of the leak. All of these pipes will need to be replaced - I'm currently debating whether to order a full set of stainless steel brake hard lines and fuel hard lines (along with the vacuum booster) - or make my own.

The frame also has a lot of rust in some small areas - the front crumple area has had a lot of work on it, the rear engine mount area is similar, and near where the trailing arms connect. The plan is, over the next month or two, to strip down to the frame of most components (definitely engine, transmission, and brakes - maybe suspension) - find all of the rust spots (inside and out), grind them clean or cut out the rust where necessary, and then I'll have an idea of what it'll take to restore it.

Delorean Industries
05-27-2020, 08:02 AM
[This section is as posted in the "What have you done to your DeLorean today?" post]

Got some bad news from Toby at Delorean Service Northwest - looks like 5510 needs a new frame, or some extensive frame repair. Still trying to decide whether to bring it home, pull the body off the frame, and go to work on a full frame restoration... If anyone has thoughts on the subject, I'd love to hear it! The Stainless Steel frame is out of my budget. Tips on what work to do at the same time, how to approach it, materials to use, etc. Someone had recommended replacing the coolant lines? Maybe rebuild the suspension? If it makes a difference, my father is a professional welder with 30+ years of experience and would likely be able to do the welding for me if I handle ripping it apart and cutting out the bad stuff. He lives ~1700 miles away, so I would have to prep everything for him to do over a few days or a week, then I'd wrap it up by POR-15'ing the whole thing.

Prior to getting the news about the frame, I also ordered a complete brake rebuild kit. New rotors, pads, seals, caliper pistons, hoses, etc. I think I'm going to pick up a full set of stainless steel brake lines as well, since the brake vacuum line is toast and the body is coming off anyway. This would mean replacing everything in the brake system except the booster, master cylinder, and calipers.

In non-Delorean news, I sold my Honda CR-Z. I now have ample funds and room in the garage to work!

Amazon: $123

Oil/fuel drain pan & funnels
Silicone Brake Parts lubricant
Wheel chocks
Castrol DOT4 brake fluid (3x 12oz - enough for a full replacement, I think)
Thread locker
Disk brake compressor
Brake cleaner
Copper anti-seize


Delorean Go: $699

Front & rear rotors
Front & rear pads
Front & rear rebuild kits
Front & rear caliper pistons
Front & rear brake hoses
Misc brake hardware (retaining clips, pins, shims)


We have no record of contact regarding a stainless frame or quoting one to you. Curious as we are the only manufacturer of stainless frames and only advertise our manual version. We have no authorized dealers and only sell directly to clients with VIN numbers. It sounds like someone was trying to pull a fast one on you.

CyberBill
05-27-2020, 02:43 PM
We have no record of contact regarding a stainless frame or quoting one to you. Curious as we are the only manufacturer of stainless frames and only advertise our manual version. We have no authorized dealers and only sell directly to clients with VIN numbers. It sounds like someone was trying to pull a fast one on you.

The price is on your website. :) Starting at $12k, and I believe there used to be an option to get the automatic version listed for ~$1k extra? Doesn't seem to be there now, but with an option or two and shipping I'd be looking at $14-$15k.

https://deloreanindustries.com/delorean-1-stainless-frame-base/

Don't get me wrong - if I had the money I'd be all over it, it's clearly the top of the line best option available, and I don't think it is a bad deal or overpriced for the product - it's just far outside of my budget.

Delorean Industries
05-27-2020, 04:50 PM
Yes, that is the all-out version with all of the add ons and EFI provisions. Significantly cheaper without all of that bare-bones.

CyberBill
05-27-2020, 08:31 PM
Yes, that is the all-out version with all of the add ons and EFI provisions. Significantly cheaper without all of that bare-bones.

Good to know!! Once I get the frame ripped apart so I can really see how bad the rust is, I'll consider shooting you an email to get a quote.

Delorean Industries
05-27-2020, 09:26 PM
We also save all good mild steel chassis removed for frame updates. If your current frame is beyond repair, we have a massive stockpile of good mild steel chassis available.

Rich_NYS
05-28-2020, 12:08 AM
Nice job!

Would you please post pics of the body on the furniture dollies? Is is easy to move around?

I'm planning to separate 4519 this year.

CyberBill
05-29-2020, 01:58 AM
Nice job!

Would you please post pics of the body on the furniture dollies? Is is easy to move around?

I'm planning to separate 4519 this year.

Sure, here you go:

63826

The jack stand there isn't actually under anything, I just didn't move it out of the picture. :) I would say that this is a pretty crappy system and does not move around almost at all. Might be caused by the kitty litter still sitting there that I need to get out of the way (was soaking up coolant), or maybe that it's not quite centered. I will say that when we first dropped the body on the dolly, we had it straight across the middle of the wood, and it flexed so much I was sure it would break if I left it like that! across the wheels is much nicer.

Rich_NYS
05-29-2020, 12:35 PM
Sure, here you go:

63826

The jack stand there isn't actually under anything, I just didn't move it out of the picture. :) I would say that this is a pretty crappy system and does not move around almost at all. Might be caused by the kitty litter still sitting there that I need to get out of the way (was soaking up coolant), or maybe that it's not quite centered. I will say that when we first dropped the body on the dolly, we had it straight across the middle of the wood, and it flexed so much I was sure it would break if I left it like that! across the wheels is much nicer.Cool, thanks.

Sent from my LGL164VL using Tapatalk

CyberBill
05-30-2020, 10:48 PM
Cool, thanks.

Sent from my LGL164VL using Tapatalk

Check out my other thread - I made a new dolly that is awesome: http://dmctalk.org/showthread.php?18233-How-to-move-body-when-removed-from-the-frame

CyberBill
06-04-2020, 11:47 PM
This past week I've been making (slow) progress on getting the transmission and engine out. Currently the transmission is fully disconnected and likely only hanging on by the one bolt on the bell housing whose head sheared off. I can see a ring of rust around the bolt that is probably holding on. I've got a tiny gap going, and I'm constantly spraying it down with penetrating fluid and doing my best to try and free it. I may end up drilling out the bolt to get it free, but I'm going slow and taking my time. The engine is also mostly disconnected except for some coolant lines and stuff, which I suspect will all come off pretty easily.

In the last week or two I've purchased a lot of tools, though! Roughly $1,000 worth. Here's the list as best I can remember:

1 ton engine/shop crane
2 ton load leveler
lifting sling
1 ton engine stand and M10x75mm bolts
1/2" ratchet w/ pivoting head
3/8" and 1/4" torque wrenches
adjustable wrenches
long socket extensions
various pry bars
"front wheel drive axle socket set" (included 35mm for the crank)
2 transmission jacks
2 furniture dollies (as previously mentioned, for holding the body)
4x wheel dollies (as previously mentioned, for holding the frame)
4x4s, L-brackets, structural screws, and casters for DMC Dolly
cheap angle grinder and a couple packs of metal grinding/cut off/flap wheel discs
4" PVC flange, cleanout, plug, tiki torch wick, PVC glue, baby oil, resistance wire, etc for DIY Smoke Tester.
corded electric torque wrench

CyberBill
06-14-2020, 08:06 PM
From my other post:


I got the engine and transmission removed from the frame!! Only missed one hose, which was a coolant line coming from the overflow tank. I learned some things - first was that you can get stainless steel carabiners (or similar) that can hold 1800 pounds, which work really great to hold the load balancer chains to the lift rings on the engine. Second, since the engine and transmission weigh about 750 pounds, its best to stick the engine hoist out there - mine is rated for 1-ton, and I set it at the 3/4 ton spot. I wish I would have put it at the 1/2 ton spot, because when I lifted the engine up high it started to rub on the hoist itself.

Once out, I was able to take off the two little plates that have to come off in order to separate the engine and transmission, and since both are present I will assume that the transmission has never been removed from the engine.

The transmission is still stuck to the engine, though. I got some MAPP gas and tried heating up the area around the stuck bolt, but that wasn't successful. I can get quite a large gap (1/2") on the passenger side, and a small 1/8" gap on the drivers side, so it's definitely just that bolt. I also tried using an SDS hammer drill set to hammer mode to try and punch out the bolt, but that didn't work either. This damn bolt is really stuck in there!!

Since my last update, I went and bought some stuff... I sold my plate compactor and used the proceeds ($400) to purchase a pressure washer and accessories. I also paid ~$650 for a Titanium MIG 140 welder, plus an auto darkening helmet, gloves, welding apron, and a bunch of welding accessories.

The past few days I spent cleaning up the garage and working on tearing down the frame. Today it was finally nice enough that I rolled the engine and transmission out of the way, then pulled the frame into the driveway and pressure washed it. TONS of dirt and nasty crap came off, plus probably a pound of epoxy chips. I then took this chance to walk around the frame and inspect all of the areas of rust:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YcTgm-ec3XM

Anything is repairable - but I'm not sure whether I have the skills to make it happen, and I'm also not sure whether this is what I should be using my time doing. Strongly considering a stainless frame.

David T
06-15-2020, 10:54 PM
Most of the frame damage is pretty common for a rusted frame. The "repairs" if you want to call them that do make the job a bit more work because they should all be removed and redone properly. On a car like this one of the big problems is that all of the fasteners are so rusty that when you try to undo them they all break. Makes for a lot of extra work. The frame is very repairable BUT. You have to decide how much time you want to spend fixing it, who is going to fix it, what another frame will cost and what it will cost to get it shipped (shipping is a significant cost because of the size and weight). To fix the frame all you need is some 16 gauge cold rolled steel which is not expensive. You already bought a welder (I would have suggested gas or MIG but TIG is OK, it will just take more skill to master it). Wither you fix the frame or replace it you have to remove everything anyway. An additional cost to fix the frame would be to have it stripped, either blasted or dipped unless you do it yourself. Keep in mind unless you buy a S/S frame, any frame you do find may require at least some repair, if only to convert it to automatic. Because the transmission was slipping you may have to get it rebuilt. With the body removed, replace ALL of the metal lines because they can't be replaced once the body is back on. My vote is to fix the frame but you will need to learn to weld. Plenty of videos on Youtube or you can go to an adult education class or many shops that sell welding supplies can show you how to weld. It takes more patience than skill and the more you do the better you will get. The "exfoliation" you saw is when you have rust, it expands and forces the pieces apart. You must remove the plate and repair the underside before replacing the other piece. Rust is like cancer, you must cut it all out till you get to good, solid metal. Where you have surface rust you can just grind it off. Once all of the rust and repairs are done you have to decide to paint it or have it dipped in molten zinc. Dipping in zinc, it will last nearly forever but you will add some weight and is expensive. Painting is cheaper and you can do it yourself. Once you strip the frame you can refer to R:02:02-03 to verify that the frame is straight. If you do spend for the S/S frame IMHO it doesn't make the car worth anymore than if you had a good steel frame and it is a bit heavier. The Delorean is underpowered enough, adding more weight to it will just make it's performance worse. If you can buy a good frame cheap you will save a lot of time but figure you will still have to strip and paint it.

CyberBill
06-16-2020, 03:17 AM
Most of the frame damage is pretty common for a rusted frame. The "repairs" if you want to call them that do make the job a bit more work because they should all be removed and redone properly. On a car like this one of the big problems is that all of the fasteners are so rusty that when you try to undo them they all break. Makes for a lot of extra work. The frame is very repairable BUT. You have to decide how much time you want to spend fixing it, who is going to fix it, what another frame will cost and what it will cost to get it shipped (shipping is a significant cost because of the size and weight). To fix the frame all you need is some 16 gauge cold rolled steel which is not expensive. You already bought a welder (I would have suggested gas or MIG but TIG is OK, it will just take more skill to master it). Wither you fix the frame or replace it you have to remove everything anyway. An additional cost to fix the frame would be to have it stripped, either blasted or dipped unless you do it yourself. Keep in mind unless you buy a S/S frame, any frame you do find may require at least some repair, if only to convert it to automatic. Because the transmission was slipping you may have to get it rebuilt. With the body removed, replace ALL of the metal lines because they can't be replaced once the body is back on. My vote is to fix the frame but you will need to learn to weld. Plenty of videos on Youtube or you can go to an adult education class or many shops that sell welding supplies can show you how to weld. It takes more patience than skill and the more you do the better you will get. The "exfoliation" you saw is when you have rust, it expands and forces the pieces apart. You must remove the plate and repair the underside before replacing the other piece. Rust is like cancer, you must cut it all out till you get to good, solid metal. Where you have surface rust you can just grind it off. Once all of the rust and repairs are done you have to decide to paint it or have it dipped in molten zinc. Dipping in zinc, it will last nearly forever but you will add some weight and is expensive. Painting is cheaper and you can do it yourself. Once you strip the frame you can refer to R:02:02-03 to verify that the frame is straight. If you do spend for the S/S frame IMHO it doesn't make the car worth anymore than if you had a good steel frame and it is a bit heavier. The Delorean is underpowered enough, adding more weight to it will just make it's performance worse. If you can buy a good frame cheap you will save a lot of time but figure you will still have to strip and paint it.

Thanks David, I really appreciate the info! I've read many of your comments in other threads about galvanization and what not.

The welder I picked up is a combination gas MIG and Flux Core, not TIG. I thought about TIG, but it seemed like too steep of a learning curve for me.

You're definitely right, that I'm having a heck of a time with the fasteners - but I am learning. ;) I use lots of Liquid Wrench (among others), I've mostly switched to using my impact wrench to loosen things, and I go slow and work the bolts back and forth. The goal right now is to continue to strip the frame to bare, which resulted in this outcome:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9uLKoNDtlf0

Taking out the fuel tank shows a lot of rust and delamination of the steel. I think at this point I am beyond the cost-benefit of fixing the frame, at least given my connections. The cost I calculated to acid strip, galvanize, replace the front frame extension, and powder coat came out to over $3k. Add in the cost to do the welding, and time needed to get the processes done, transport the frame from one place to another, redrill and tap all of the holes in the frame, I'm looking at months of work before I can even start putting it back together.

From looking around here, I think I can get a decent used frame for about $4-5k, but you're absolutely right that it would still require some work, and wouldn't be galvanized, and would likely need more work down the road. I'm talking to someone now that has one locally, but it's a manual frame. If I bought it then went through the stripping, galvanizing, and powder coating process, that's another $2k, and I can get a new mild steel frame, galvanized and powder coated from DeloreanGo for $8,300 + shipping. Shipping will be expensive from the UK, though. And I just got a quote from DeLorean Industries for a stainless steel frame that's for quite a bit more, but isn't apples-to-apples since it includes coil overs and brake lines. If I try to wiggle the numbers to be equivalent, it's roughly ~$2k more, which is actually quite a deal if you ask me.

Regarding power, I think I have that covered. ;) I haven't mentioned it here, but I plan on converting the drive train to electric in about 6 months, which will roughly double the horsepower at the wheels. That will be fast enough for me. If I ever feel the need for a fast car, I'll buy one. lol

David T
06-16-2020, 01:37 PM
My vote is still to fix what you got. If you get a used frame you might wind up with one that is bent. You will learn a new skill (welding) and it will serve you well in converting the car to electric. Painting the frame is a good option, the epoxy did last a long time but nothing lasts forever. You can grind the old epoxy off or get it blasted. If you have more money then time, then getting another frame may be the way to go though.

CyberBill
07-03-2020, 05:23 PM
I didn't realize it had been a couple of week since my last update! Well, I have the frame stripped down completely bare at this point and am working my way through taking apart all of the suspension and brake components that are sitting in a pile... but the big news is that I've got a replacement frame on the way!!

After much thought, I decided on the stainless steel frame from DeLorean Industries. Yes, it is expensive, but it will make the car last another 40 years. The existing frame is quite far gone and after reaching out to a bunch of places, I wasn't able to find a solution to getting the frame stripped. I'll be selling the frame for cheap soon, probably as soon as I get everything moved over to the new one. The old frame would need to have the front frame extension replaced, and the front and rear cross members need to be rebuilt, there are at least 4 places where a small area will need to be cut out and then replaced, and most of the frame (including trailing arms) needs to be fully stripped to bare metal and repainted or powder coated or something to get rid of the surface rust. It's just too much time and work for me to do just to have a mediocre frame covered in spot repairs, and not able to drive the car for 6 months. If I could find a place (or places) to acid strip (or sandblast), galvanize, and powder coat it, then things might be different since I'd end up with a better-than-new frame, and if I'm not able to get rid of the frame in short order, I'll probably continue down the path of restoring it so it can live on as someone else's replacement.

Along with the stainless frame, I also purchased a lot of addons from DI. Stainless radius arms, SPEC coilovers front and rear, SPEC lower arm supports, stainless brake and fuel hard lines, and new cooling hoses. I also got the frame powder coated and it will be crated up and shipped from Ohio to the Seattle area in a couple of weeks. In the mean time, I'm making my way through the brakes and suspension and all of the parts pulled from the car. All the hard pieces that are remaining will be pressure washed, sand blasted, and powder coated. The lower control arms will be boxed in. All bushings and bearings will be replaced. The brakes will be rebuilt and new rotors, too. Basically, the frame and everything on it (except for the motor and transmission) will be better than brand new the next time the car drives out of the garage. :)

Delorean Industries
07-03-2020, 05:46 PM
You actually ordered billet front lower arms with the Coilover system. No need to box the factory front lower arms. The only things you will need to refurbish are the rear upper and lower links, front upper control arms, front sway bar, and front/rear hub assemblies.

CyberBill
07-04-2020, 01:51 AM
You actually ordered billet front lower arms with the Coilover system. No need to box the factory front lower arms. The only things you will need to refurbish are the rear upper and lower links, front upper control arms, front sway bar, and front/rear hub assemblies.

Oh joy! I didn't realize the lowers came with the kit! :D One less thing to deal with!!

CyberBill
08-14-2020, 10:39 PM
Look what I got!!

64275 64278 64276

The new frame is here! It was an ordeal to get - nothing to do with DPI, but the shipping company I chose (Road Runner) did not take care of me as a customer. They missed 2 deliveries, and on the last one the driver called 10 minutes before arrival, was rude to me on the phone, and then never showed up and didn't call me to let me know. So instead, I had to drive ~45 miles each way and rent a trailer to pick it up. BUT it's here!! I've recorded a lot of video and one day I'll edit together, but for now I'll just say that this is AWESOME! Every piece is beautiful, and as I opened each package I was blown away at how nice everything was. It was expensive, for sure, but it is also clearly worth the expense. I pretty much went all out and bought many of the upgrades available. Let me catch up the thread on some recent purchases:


Dorman 611-310 and 611-221 lug nuts, 10 of each - $110
Steering rack with ball joints - DeloreanGo - $250
Parking brake retraction plate - DGO - $20
Exhaust manifold gasket kit - DGO - $176 [I just realized that I accidentally ordered 24 studs/washers/nuts rather than 12 - oops - so maybe take $60 off of this as I'll try to send that back]
Coolant pipe kit - DGO - $399
Stainless hose clamp kit - DGO - $65
Engine mount bolts & washers - DGO - $6
SS Frame (powder coated in grey), SS radius arms (powder coated in grey), SS closing plate (powder coated in grey), SPEC coilover kit (front & rear coil overs, new front lower control arm with bushings and ball joints, lower control arm supports), SS brake hard lines, SS fuel hard lines, silicon coolant hose kit - $16,130 + ~$750 shipping (cost prior to me changing to pickup, so this will go down)


This last week I went to clean my coolant pipes, since they weren't leaking and I figured they were fine - but as soon as I started cleaning them I found that roughly half had a bunch of pin-holes under the hoses. I didn't think it was worth getting them welded, so I got a new full setup. At this point there is actually quite little going back on the chassis that isn't brand new. The engine, transmission, and radiator on going back on mostly as-is. I'm only replacing the exhaust gaskets and stuff because they are so rusted (and welded to hell by a previous owner) that I couldn't disassemble them, which I don't want to deal with when I pull the engine again. Plus the larger suspension items like the spindle, hub carrier, etc, but those are all getting rebuilt.

Oh, I also got a lot of new tools!!


Air hammer
Air hammer punch/drift pin set
Rounded-nut remover kit
Amazon Echo Dot for the garage
12-ton shop press
Various sets of press dies and sleeves for bearings, bushings, etc
Wheel stud installer tool
Stud extractor tool
Riv-nut installer tool kit
Oiler can, for 50/50 ATF/Acetone mix, which has been recommended a lot
Electrolysis setup for rust removal


The last item to mention is that I've created a public project board to help me track my progress and know what tasks I have left to do. Since I work at Microsoft I get access to this site called Azure Dev Ops, though I don't think anyone externally uses it. It's still a work in progress.

https://billcarlson.visualstudio.com/DeLorean%20Restoration/

I haven't started rebuilding anything, still working my way through refurbishing all of the components that will go back on. I'm also working on a full list of items to purchase. It's currently about 150 unique items long, and I suspect I'll hit 250 or so by the time I'm done. Each of those items is listed and I look up the price on DMCH, DeloreanGO, DPI, and (if possible) BoltDepot or McMaster Carr. There are a few other supplies that are included on some items (DeLorean Parts Northwest, for example). By default I chose the lowest cost out of the bunch, but for many items there are different options available such as stainless steel or rubber/poly or old stock vs. newly made, so I have additional rows for those as well. It is incredibly time consuming doing it by hand - easily tens of hours so far, and I'll be very happy if I'm done by the end of this weekend!

64277

CyberBill
09-01-2020, 08:02 PM
Wow, time sure flies - it's been another two weeks and I'm ready for another update.

Using ADO/VisualStudio.com for project management has been a god send. Seriously - it keeps me on track and has prevented me from restoring dozens of parts that I don't need. Having everything in Excel is also SUPER helpful. Here's my current statistics:

Identified 226 unique parts / 480 pieces on the frame for restoration/replacement/reuse
Identified 75 unique parts / 172 pieces on the car for restoration
70.9% (122) of the parts slated for restoration are ready for zinc plating/powder coating, only 50 remaining

Here's what my Excel sheets look like:

6439764398

If you want to see the full excel document, it is attached to this work item in my project: https://billcarlson.visualstudio.com/DeLorean%20Restoration/_workitems/edit/28

Let me give you a glimpse into the process here - because it's an insane amount of work. :) I started with the parts diagrams and identified each part, put it into Excel with it's name, part number, and area on the car. I looked up the pricing information of the part from all of the vendors and a generic provider, if possible. I then visually inspected that part on the vehicle to see it's condition. Then, I weighed (abstractly) the time, effort, and cost to repair/restore the component vs. purchasing new. Some items are easy here - the pivot bolts on the suspension, for example. They're expensive, like $30 each, and restoring them is essentially wire wheeling the gunk off of them and sending them out to be zinc plated. There are some items like basic washers that I can buy for like $0.10, and it makes no sense to even spend 5 minutes to clean them. Most parts fall somewhere in the middle, where they are fairly expensive - but they take a lot of time and effort to restore, and so I just do my best to make a good decision, usually erring on the side of buying new.

This process has really opened my eyes to the parts availability for the DeLorean!! I was routinely blown away when a particular piece was unable to be sourced or hugely expensive. Transmission mount brackets ($300 each), for example, or exhaust manifolds (>$400 each).

Some things I've been doing a lot of:

Manual wire brushing (nylon, brass, and steel)
Angle-grinder wire wheeling
Bench grinder wire wheeling
Wire pipe-brushing
Soaking things in a bucket of degreaser
Using elecrolysis for rust removal
Soaking things in Evaporust
Using blending pads on things
Dremel wire wheeling


The rust electrolysis system is one I'm particularly happy with. Total investment is well under $100 for a plastic tub, some washing soda (sodium carbonate), a 30V 5A digital variable power supply, and some scrap sheet metal. I can let things sit in there for days without worrying about it 'going too far', and it seriously just eats the rust right off. If it misses anything, like on the steering rack mounts that have some weird inset parts, I toss it in Evaporust (at $30/gallon) and let it sit for a few days.

Now onto some recent purchases for the car:


Toby's Disassembly Service (removed bushings, bearings, and stuck bolts that I couldn't) - DSNW - $543
Front sway-bar combo kit - DPNW - $108.55
Roughly 50 nuts, bolts, washers - Bolt Depot - $28.53
510 Piece stainless hex bolt/nut/washer set - Amazon - $18.49
55 piece stainless cushioned pipe clamp set - Amazon - $25.99
Cotter pin set - Amazon - $6.99


And some new tools:


Pipe cleaning brush set - Large, Stainless
Pipe cleaning brush set - Small, Nylon
8" Bench grinder and 8" Dewalt wire wheel
Bench vise, with anvil

CyberBill
09-14-2020, 05:57 PM
Another two weeks, and I'm ready for another update!!

I'm really nearing the end of the process of getting all the parts ready to start rebuilding. The first big news is that I was able to find a local shop to do TIG welding and machining. I dropped off the hub carriers, knuckles, and exhaust manifolds a few days ago and just got the email confirming they are done and ready for pick up. (I'll include the cost for this once I pay it)

Next big news is that I found a local place (Monroe, WA) called Metal Tech who can do zinc plating. I got a quote, which is their minimum, of $324 to plate all of the items here in this picture:

64478

Here's a closer look at some of the items, this is what things look like after they're hit with the wire wheel and/or had a rust removal process done.

64479644816448264483

All of these items will be sand blasted as needed, aggressively degreased, acid etched, then zinc plated with a yellow chromate finish. This was all dropped off, and they gave me an ETA of about a week.

The only remaining process I need to send out items for is powder coating. I've got most things ready to go except for the upper control arms and rear brake calipers, which are currently in the rust bath process and should be wrapped up this evening. Also the knuckles and hub carriers are going to be powder coated as well.

Next up - I put in orders through pretty much every vendor. :) Through BoltDepot I picked up about ~150 items, all the generic bolts and washers and Nyloc nuts and stuff. From DPI I picked up stainless radius arm brackets, front hub snap rings, plus some generic nuts and bolts and stuff. Through DeLorean Go I picked up brake line clips, trailing arm shims, a couple of fuel hoses, caliper bleed screws, body bolts, and coolant pipe brackets, among the generic nuts and bolts and things. I also splurged and picked up the LED Tail Light Boards, Bulb, and Flasher kit. My last order is from DMCH, and included a new rear suspension lower link (I severely disfigured one while trying to remove the bushings), a dipstick upper bracket, and misc. nuts and bolts and things. I'm also working with Toby from DPNW to get an order ready, but haven't made the purchase yet.

Purchases:

Generic nuts & bolts - BoltDepot - $40
Wings-B-Cool Self Bleeder kit - DPNW - $76
Radius Arm Brackets, Misc parts - DPI - $104
All sorts of random things - DGO - $200
LED Tail light board kit - DGO - $160
Rear Lower Link, Misc parts - DMCH - $148

CyberBill
10-03-2020, 03:39 AM
It's been a very productive and fruitful two weeks!

First - the TIG welder got the parts back, and they look excellent! Most of the repairs were very minor, and the total was $120. He wasn't able to do the machining on the exhaust as I was hoping, but I was able to flatten them myself with an orbital sander and 80 grit paper. Still LOTS of pitting and stuff, but the areas where the exhaust should seal look good to me. The entire exhaust is now fully disassembled, the last part was getting the O2 sensor removed, which required me to cut it off so I could use an impact wrench on it and I have a new one incoming from DGO. The exhaust is going to be painted in VHT paint and the crossover pipe will be wrapped in some fiberglass wrap material to cut down on heat since the heat shields are missing.

Second - Zinc plating! The items are all returned, and they are AWESOME! Oh man, they look so good, it's incredible. With these items back in my possession, there are about a dozen things I can get installed. Here's a very short video:

https://youtu.be/ig57n0Ih9dk

Third - Powder coating! They are currently all at a powder coating place and the ETA is the 9th. Cost estimate was $350, which is 1/3rd the price of the other places I found. The other places wanted $400 just to powder coat the brake calipers!

Fourth - I've received loads of parts. The biggest order was from Toby at DPNW, which included all the replacement bearings, bushings, and ball joints that are on the car, a new dipstick tube, a full set of stub axle nuts, auto transmission cooler pipes, pivot bolts, and inconel trailing arm bolts (Toby TABs, except he doesn't make them anymore), and new heater tubes. I put in a couple of orders through DGO for some pipe clips, performance air intake (no way I'm using a soggy piece of cardboard as an air intake), some fuel lines, fuel filter, air filter, a new set of struts all around, lambda sensor, and a tiny stupid friction spring for the parking brake caliper that costs $10 - which is $9 more than it should cost. From Amazon, I picked up all of the parts to put together a vibration dampened lower steering column. Quite expensive, if you ask me, but the parts sure do look and feel a lot nicer.

Fifth - I've actually started putting things together! The frame now has the fuel tank installed, the closing plate, most of the brake and fuel hard lines, the steering rack, the gear selector and shift linkage, motor mounts, heater core hard lines, and I also tossed the front coil overs on. Here's a longer video showing the current status of 5510:

https://youtu.be/ooAghBC1Rb8

Purchases

TIG welding repair - $120
Zinc plating - MetalTech - $355
Bearings, Bushings, etc - DPNW - $1,092
Intake, filters, struts - DGO - $350
Lower steering column - Amazon - $275
VHT exhaust primer, paint, and wrap - Amazon - $75

Michael
10-03-2020, 08:12 AM
Wow! That's to be too pretty to cover up with a body.

CyberBill
10-19-2020, 07:35 PM
I was really hoping to get a lot more done over this past week, since I took the week off to work on the car. But unfortunately I didn't get my powder coating order back and those parts make up most of the suspension and brakes. ETA is now 10/21. It's funny, though - I thought I didn't do that much, and then I went and started writing down the list of what I did, and it's a TON of stuff over the past two weeks!!

Here's a short list:

Fuel accumulator, filter, and fuel lines - these are now fully installed! I only need the final hoses to the engine.
Heater core silicone hoses - Heater core lines are complete and ready to attach to the engine and heater core.
Cooling pipes & silicone hoses - These are run from the radiator to the engine compartment, going to hook up to the engine before tightening everything.
Radiator is temporarily installed (to align the cooling pipes) - Mounts are being powder coated, once they are back I'll install permanently with new bushings.
Lower steering column is built and installed - It looks like a work of art!! Beautiful!!
Lower control arms and stabilizing arms are installed, but not torqued down.
Transmission mounts are installed on the frame.
Exhaust is now primed, painted, and the manifolds are installed on the engine. O2/lambda sensor is installed on the crossover pipe.
Parking brake calipers are built and ready to be installed once I have the main brake calipers.

I've got a bit of a story with the transmission. I've got two - one is the original with ~67k miles and sometimes slips and leaks and needs to be rebuilt. The other has like ~25k miles if memory serves me, and was meant to replace the other one while it was being rebuilt. Unfortunately, the replacement trans is missing the shift cable and it looks like it would be quite a bit of work to swap them, and I'm on kind of a tight deadline. So instead, I'm going to use the original for the time being and swap them once we've moved to our new house with the shop. This week I refinished the transmission oil dipstick tube and vacuum lines for the transmission, and I chased the M7 threads. The M10 threads will get chased tonight, and if all goes well that will mean the trans is ready to mount back onto the engine.

Here is a video from about a week ago, that covers some of the info here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qfPpzU47J1c

Purchases:

Fuel line 'olives' and swivel nuts, parking brake pieces, roof box repair kit - $116 - DGO
Stainless bleed adapter, air box oil breather hose, fuel supply & return hoses, radiator mount bushings - $200 - DGO
Stainless rivnuts & bolts kits - $32 - Amazon
Stainless cable clamps - $26 - Amazon
Mobil 1 10W-40 (10qt) - $77 - Amazon
M5, M6, and M8 bolts and washers, for hose clamps and the closing plate - $25 - BoltDepot
M7 and M10 bolts and washers, for catalytic converter and engine mounts, plus bolt organizer boxes - $57 - BoltDepot


Tools:

Tap & Die sets to cover everything M5 and up.
Fuel pressure tester kit
Stubby wrench kit
Cooling system pressure tester/filler

CyberBill
10-26-2020, 01:57 AM
A week later, and some more progress! It really feels like its coming together and starting to look like a complete frame! Big news is that the powder coating came in! 90% of the parts look great, except the rear hub carriers... and the powder coating took twice as long as expected... and they tried to charge me double... and they didn't clean up the parts or remove the silicone inserts or high temp tape so they took a lot of cleaning up... but they're HERE!

Let me first by back tracking on my last update about the transmission. I misunderstood how the shift cable attaches on the inside of the transmission, and I thought I was looking at one thing when it was really another. It turns out that you can simply put the transmission in park, then twist the cable and it will unscrew a tube from over a bolt inside the trans. It then pulls right out, and is easy to swap. Took me all of 5 minutes! So I'm back to using the ~26k mile transmission. It also had some damage on the torque converter bell housing, and that was repaired (welded) a few weeks go, so I replaced the bell housing on the transmission and I'm now back in business! The only thing I'm waiting for now is the 6 bolts that attach the mount brackets to the trans, and I'll be able to mount the engine and transmission together and get them in the frame.

Since my powder coating stuff is in, that means I could build the brakes... so I did that! They look really bad ass, if you ask me. Here's a little video showing them o
https://youtu.be/Dso822F5qZ4

Other than that, my focus has been on the suspension components. I used the shop press to put wheel bearings in the front and rear. I pressed the bushings into the upper suspension links, and then found out that I totally ordered the wrong number of bushings! I missed ordering bushings for the front upper control arms and for the lower link (same as the upper links). But that's OK, because I was able to get everything installed on the passenger side mocked up and make sure it lines up and everything. Glad I did, too, because it took about 5 tries to get right!

Here's the current status of the project:
https://youtu.be/YTWTwALtfbk

I'm still having issues with the coolant tubes under the fuel tank... Just can't get them positioned how I want. And the front bearings don't slip on the spindle like they are supposed to. And I'm still waiting for the coil over brackets in the rear, and the trailing arm support brackets. But I really do think here in a couple of weeks I'll be ready to drop the body back down!!

Purchases

Powder coating services - $400 - Thermo Tech Coatings
Rear suspension bushings, Upper control arm bushings, Trailing arm shims, misc parts - $141 - DGO

Michael
10-26-2020, 09:17 AM
That is going to be one nice chassis!

Rich_NYS
10-26-2020, 10:11 AM
I'm really liking this thread, I'll be doing much of the same work to 4519 starting next month.

Lookin' good Bill!

Victor
10-26-2020, 11:23 AM
That is going to be one nice chassis!

Indeed!! That is like a brand new chassis! The basic fondation to build on 👍🏼🔧

CyberBill
11-02-2020, 02:30 AM
I've hit a huge milestone today- the engine and transmission are back in the frame!!

This past week I've made a lot of progress all around. I got the bushings for the rear suspension lower link, and they went in without a hitch. I also got new bushings for the front upper control arms, and those were slightly more tricky - but still I got them in and got the UCAs installed. I also was able to get the front end reinforcing brackets and sway bar MOSTLY installed (still fighting it a bit because there isn't enough weight on the car). I pressed the front hubs onto the spindles, and installed the brake calipers, plus all the brake lines, so at this point the front suspension and brakes are pretty much complete other than brake pads and the bolts needing to be all torqued down.

On the rear, the suspension links are all installed, as well as the hub carriers, hubs, and rotors. Trailing arms are installed. I installed the brake caliper and brake lines on the passenger side, but then realized I need to file down the parking brake pads before I can install them, so that'll be on the short list.

Since getting the suspension mostly hooked up, I started working on the transmission. The torque converter wouldn't go on, and after getting some help on Facebook, I found out that the oil pump rod was bent slightly, and had caused some mushrooming on the oil pump sprocket. Took about 3 hours, but eventually I was able to get the torque converter installed and then get the transmission (and torque converter) mounted up to the engine. Once attached, there are 3 plates that need to be installed - the transmission protection plate on the bottom, the inspection plate on the driver's side, and the starter on the passenger side. They all bolted up without issue.

The engine and transmission were then dropped into the frame mounts, which was pretty straight forward. Actually a lot easier since the bumper section of the frame is removable on the DPI frame.

I've got two videos - first is the engine prior to installing into the frame:

https://youtu.be/8TPu2GjkfjE

And then after installing it, which also shows many of the other items installed over the last week:

https://youtu.be/938Z3JPC2SQ

NorthEastJBD
11-03-2020, 03:27 PM
This post it great!

Mine will never look this nice.

Excellent job.

EngineerGuY
11-03-2020, 07:20 PM
Amazing updates! This build is epic Bill. Looking forward to more pictures and updates!

CyberBill
11-09-2020, 01:50 AM
Another long week, working at least a couple hours each night after work and 8+ hours each weekend day, and quite a bit to show for it!

Since the engine and transmission are now in the car, most of the focus was on things that connect to it. The transmission mounts and engine mounts are now torqued down. I installed the half shafts on both sides. I put on the replacement intake pipes from DeloreanGo that replace the strange collection of construction paper-based tubes. The transmission shift linkage was installed and realigned (it was off by about 3 turns). The heater core tubes (plus new valve) were installed and connected - up front I used a short piece of aluminum pipe to bridge the supply & return lines (like the heater core would) so I can pressure test, fill, and bleed the whole system before putting the body on. The rear brakes are complete and installed on both sides, including parking brakes and hard lines, and with brake pads all around - the brakes are now complete and ready to be pressure tested!!

The exhaust crossover pipe is installed, and both it and the catalytic converter have been wrapped to try and cut down on temperatures in the engine bay. I didn't realize that it would be impossible to get a bolt onto the catalytic converter from the 'front', so after struggling with it for a couple of hours I decided I will go back and weld on some studs. The PO had put bolts on and welded them, but they were in terrible shape, so hopefully I can do a

I also spent a ton of time on the cooling system. The pipe under the fuel tank on the driver's side would just NOT fit. At all. I must have tried for 3 hours. So I pulled out the old one, cleaned it up, and then used brazing rods to fill in the few pin holes - we'll see if it holds up. The old one fit easily - so on went the closing plate and all of the rest of the pipes all the way back to the engine. All new silicone hoses were installed, including the ones that connect to the water pump (but not the ones under the intake). On the passenger side, the automatic transmission cooler was installed and the overflow tank, along with the bleeder system from DPNW.

Here's an updated video! https://youtu.be/y8gSE1GjU6Y

Purchases:

Various Nuts and Bolts - $45 - BoltDepot
Silicone trans gasket (for later!), Angle drive dust shield, Radius arm mounting plates, olives & nuts for fuel lines - $120 - DeloreanGo

Michael
11-09-2020, 10:08 AM
I can hear the excitement building in your voice during the videos. She is really looking good!!!!

EngineerGuY
11-09-2020, 12:58 PM
I can hear the excitement building in your voice during the videos. She is really looking good!!!!

Right? Excitement and confidence. Amazing to see the progress through videos. Subscribed and looking forward to more.

CyberBill
11-16-2020, 01:32 AM
This week was spent finalizing the frame, which is now complete!

On the cooling system, I got the bracket on the underside of the frame installed and tightened up. The transmission cooler was put into place, wrapped in the heatsink thing, and the pipes connected to the transmission. I installed the otterstat and the front bleeder from DPNW. Then I pressure tested the system, which discovered a few loose clamps, and it was able to hold vacuum pressure for well over an hour! Here's a video on this process:

https://youtu.be/91iWi-9dHOE

I also installed the catalytic converter, muffler, and heat shield, so the exhaust system is now complete! The horns were installed (and I might change them later...), and also the trailing arm brackets that were missing. The fuel system was finalized, which was basically installing the final braided hose between the filter and the distributor, plus tightening up the filter bracket and installing the evap hoses. Then the fuel system was pressure tested, and also the brakes. Here's a video showing all this:

https://youtu.be/YPk59FatIbM

Lastly, today I worked on getting the body raised up and the frame installed. I wanted to get further than I did, but I ran out of concrete blocks and had to go buy some more, and tonight we had a small gathering with our close friends before Washington goes under COVID lockdown starting Tuesday. I've got two videos on the progress so far:

https://youtu.be/TbW5S_quv1U

https://youtu.be/pbnpRUQlCc4

As of now the body is 2' in the air, the frame is below it, and I'm working on moving the blocks around so that I can lower the body down. It'll probably take two evenings after work to drop the body and start hooking things up, and hopefully this next weekend the car will be driving around the block!

Michael
11-16-2020, 01:53 AM
Sure is a pretty frame!

You may need to turn your pump 180 degrees to allow the cover plate to seat properly. Also, depending on the pump used, you might need a good check valve on the feed side.

CyberBill
11-17-2020, 02:34 AM
Sure is a pretty frame!

You may need to turn your pump 180 degrees to allow the cover plate to seat properly. Also, depending on the pump used, you might need a good check valve on the feed side.

Thanks Michael! Funny enough, it was faced the other way and I had to turn it to make the lines fit... and then I swapped the lines and probably need to twist it back! Feed side does have a check valve in it.

CyberBill
11-28-2020, 01:36 AM
Tons of progress since the last update, the car is nearing completion and has already made it around the block once. :)

First, here's some videos showing the remainder of getting the body lowered:

https://youtu.be/IrFWwr2k1-Q

https://youtu.be/iCB7UIHInOA

https://youtu.be/Yc6Cp8prL64

And here is going over the first start (ok, more like 3rd):

https://youtu.be/G1u_AvNunmo

and showing the first drive:

https://youtu.be/HX8x2B5Y4_w

And the longer update video:

https://youtu.be/RQKpo1GG3PM

The body is now on the frame, with about half of the body bolts in place. The remainder of the body bolts are off just a hair, and I need to fiddle a bit with the frame to get them to line up (off by 1/8" max). Once the body was down all the connectors and things went on without issue, and all connectors were cleaned with contact cleaner and all thicker wires were cleaned up with a wire wheel on my Dremel. First attempts at starting the car failed because the starter wasn't attempting to start - eventually this was traced back to the shifter linkage being slightly out of adjustment. Once that was fixed, every start of the car has been painless. It does seem to take a few seconds to start up after the car has been off for a long time, which my current thinking is that it's losing fuel pressure over time... haven't investigated, though.

From that point, I've been hooking up all the rest of the bits and bobs on the car. The brakes were hooked up the master cylinder and bled, the parking brake cables were installed and adjusted, the horns and fans were plugged in, the steering column was put in place, and lots and lots of little things like filling the coolant and what not.

Lastly, I have also spent a lot of time over the past two weeks working on the move to our new home and shop. You can get a video of the new home to DeLorean 5510 here:

https://youtu.be/eclkQejB7g0

Coming up in the next installment I will install the final remaining items on the car, get it washed, and prepped for it's longest journey since I've been its care taker.

DMC-Ron
11-28-2020, 07:25 AM
Bill,
Fantastic progress and awesome job with the work you have done on the car. I have thoroughly enjoyed watching your video progress updates. Your enthusiasm is pervasive. I get as excited as you do with your victories. Keep up the good work!

Congratulations on your new house. The shop looks fantastic.

Sincerely,
Ron

CyberBill
12-07-2020, 02:28 AM
I was able to give the car a nice rinse now that it's all put together, here's a short walk around:

https://youtu.be/l9_sXQ3fVa8

Biggest thing from this last week that's visible is that the rear fascia went on permanently. That included the fascia bracket / heat shield, impact absorber, and the fascia. I decided to replace the terrible nuts in awkward places with rivnuts for almost all of the parts that go into fiberglass - which makes the job a whole lot easier. Tail lights went in - and the board has been replaced with new ones from DGO along with LEDs. The radio antenna went in the rear pontoon, as well as charcoal cannister.

I also fixed the latch and release mechanisms on the engine cover and louvers. They both latch now and the engine cover is released with the normal handle behind the driver's seat. Those have been broken since I got the car, so it's nice to finally have them 'fixed' (good enough for now, but it's using hardware store parts).

Mechanically I did get some shims on the trailing arms and got it torqued down (I was waiting for an offset wrench), I also got the rear suspension top bolts working as intended. DPI's setup is slick, but it took me a few times of putting it on before I realized what I was doing wrong (top bolt has a 'shoulder' portion that goes through the frame AND through the suspension bracket). I also got all of the body bolts in place - which took some pry bars and a little help from my wife to screw in the bolts while I pried the body into position. The angle drive has been filled with oil and lower speedo cable is in place, but I need to rig up something to keep it from rubbing on the tire during hard left turns. The O2 sensor wire was replaced (not long enough), as well, and I finally took the time to install the gas filler neck and the two other hoses and ground that go to the metal bit at the top.

A few days ago I tried to do another test drive around a slightly larger block around the house, and it did NOT go well. I drive the car down the street and took a turn going up a hill - as soon as the car starting going up, it died, then spurted to life for a second and died again. I immediate thought "Oh crap, I'm out of gas!" so with the engine off I popped it in reverse and slowly rolled backwards down the hill, then made a turn pointing back home, and luckily the engine started up and I was able to make it back into the garage. A quick trip to the gas station got me a couple gallons in a can, and that issue went away. I was then able to drive around the block a few times and honestly it feels 10x better than it ever has. Better acceleration, better brakes, better steering. I was able to drive over to the gas station and filled it up - but then, for whatever reason, the car started acting funny... sort of felt like it was running out of gas. Holding the gas pedal down and letting it rev at 2k for the two or three minutes I was at a stop light cured it, though... Not really sure what to think about that. It's very possible that I overfilled the tank. I think a few lunch-time test drives this week are in order. :)

Some great things to note so far - the high-idle that the car had pre-teardown seems all but fixed. It used to hold at 2.2krpm while idling and now it starts there when cold and over the course of a few seconds drops down to just above 1k, then as it warms up, drops to a but under 1k. I haven't had a long enough test to see if it gets down to ~800, but it's now within spitting distance. I was worried that the temperature gauge wasn't working, and I know now that it is - though it may be reading low. The fans do kick on, so that's also great.

Now, let's talk about some not so great things! The transmission is definitely leaking ATF. Not a ton, but it seems to drip constantly. I'll double check some things, but if needed I can make a 120 mile trip with a slow leak. My heater core lines are crushed and I need to fix them before I can get heat in the cabin. Since my drive is through Snoqualmie Pass at ~3,000 feet elevation, and the current high temps there are in the 30's, I think I probably want to fix this before the trip.... Or wear a coat. The defroster will be handy to have, though. The gas gauge is totally wrong. I'll have to pull the pump and sender from the tank and see if it's sticking or something. It reads 1/2 when at a full tank, and when I ran out of gas going up a hill, it still showed 1/4 of a tank. And lastly, the voltage gauge has me worried - it runs a bit under 13V when the car is running and the head lights and stuff are on. When I turn a turn signal on, I can actually watch the voltage 'tick' down when the light is on. I think I need to clean off a few more electrical contacts! I've got a list going of other issues that can wait, but these are the important ones.

There's just a handful of things left to do and a bunch of test drives before I'll be ready to make the trip, weather permitting.

Rich_NYS
12-07-2020, 08:22 AM
Awesome, great to see you rollin'!

Sent from my LGL164VL using Tapatalk

CyberBill
12-12-2020, 11:47 PM
Cross-post from the daily thread:

Had a pretty fun day today - this is the first time I've driven the DeLorean on a highway!

I visited a place called Stew's Garage in Kirkland, WA (Totem Lake). This is a shop space where you can rent a bay, complete with a full suite of tools and a car lift. For roughly $100 I rented a bay for two hours, and it was AMAZING!! With the car up on the 4-post lift I could easily torque down all of the suspension components, which was the plan. I also poked around to try and figure out where the transmission is leaking from (In short - everywhere). It was nice to be able to have all the high quality tools available, and I surely got more done in 2 hours than I could do in a full day at home.

On the way to the garage I took only back roads, it's about 10 miles away or so, and it did really well. I was pretty nervous, since the farthest drive since the rebuild has been around the block!! On the drive home I was much more confident, and took the highway. Got it up to about 70 with no major issues.

As far as I can tell, there seems to be a small exhaust leak when I give it some gas. I can also hear a slight squealing at higher RPMs. The gas gauge is definitely not right. Temperature gauge seems low (fans come on, though). I got a little bit of smoke on the way home, but this is probably the exhaust paint & wrap, and it stopped. The steering wheel isn't centered - and the car needs an alignment. And lastly, the automatic is just... Ooof, especially as far as power is concerned. It will trigger the kick down switch and max out at about 3krpm, but going up steep hills takes a lot. It's begging for that EV conversion. :)

CyberBill
12-18-2020, 03:45 AM
It's been a while since I did a video, so this one catches up on the last few weeks:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G84Sbmb12GQ

Since my last text update I have fixed the heater core pipes and then installed the lines so the heater core is working, and I get heat in the cabin. I also cleaned up all the windows and removed stickers and stuff like that, so the view is MUCH better now. Lastly, I went to a local alignment shop recommended by Toby and they made sure the toe in the front and rear was correct.

The car is now loaded up on a trailer and heading to our new home in Ellensburg. I didn't feel comfortable driving up through Snoqualmie Pass, and was able to get it transported for $275, so I thought that was pretty reasonable.

Once in it's new home, 5510 is going to be sitting for a few months. I have some other projects I need to take care of (moving into the new house, cleaning out and selling the current house, renovating the foyer, launching an updated website for my business) and the weather is going to be pretty snowy anyway. Once I'm ready to get back to work, I've got a bit of a list going, but I really need to determine which path I'm going to go down... One option is that I can rebuild the original auto transmission and put it back in the car, which will let me really drive around without worrying and hopefully resolve the issues with having low power, and will probably increase how much I'll get when I go to sell the engine and both transmissions. The other option is to sell them just as they are, leaks and all, and jump straight into the EV conversion. I guess I have a few months to think about it!! :)

Purchases:

Stainless bumper studs, stainless air-deflector retaining strips, throttle stop, LEDs for doors and side markers - $146 - DGO

CyberBill
12-19-2020, 02:18 AM
The DeLorean made its way to Ellensburg just fine, though it's dirty again and needs another wash!!

https://youtu.be/CyQv-nypDYc

Also, I realized that I didn't mention the cost of some services that I paid for:


Stew's Garage - 2 hours - $94
Omni Brake & Alignment - $193