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View Full Version : New Hobby - Driving Instructor - Wish me luck



Dangermouse
06-10-2011, 08:50 AM
Having learned to drive 20+ years ago, I am now embarking on Step 5 of my driving career– teaching my two teenagers to drive. They just got their permits and will be hitting the open roads soon. So if you are within 50 miles of Atlanta watch out.

I’m not sure how this will go, but it has already been established that I will be the teacher and not my wife, for everyone’s sanity. Having learned to drive with a stick-shift and the four limb co-ordination that that requires, learning to drive in an auto must be a doddle. Right? Right?

So wish me luck. Any tips on staying intact (both mentally and physically) through this would be appreciated.

sean
06-10-2011, 09:21 AM
So glad Im outside that radius! Good luck Dermot.

Kukem
06-10-2011, 09:47 AM
Yeah, I second that! I am trying to teach my wife. She grew up in the city and has always used public transport. We're too far out now so she has to learn to drive. It's.... different. A nice open area and some quick E-brake reflexes was a must our first day. (Almost lost my deck supports! lol) I never realized how much drivers take for granted until you try to teach a new one.

Ryan
06-10-2011, 11:19 AM
Having learned to drive 20+ years ago, I am now embarking on Step 5 of my driving career– teaching my two teenagers to drive. They just got their permits and will be hitting the open roads soon. So if you are within 50 miles of Atlanta watch out.

I’m not sure how this will go, but it has already been established that I will be the teacher and not my wife, for everyone’s sanity. Having learned to drive with a stick-shift and the four limb co-ordination that that requires, learning to drive in an auto must be a doddle. Right? Right?

So wish me luck. Any tips on staying intact (both mentally and physically) through this would be appreciated.

No tips to offer, but please take notes on your experience. I'll need it in 14 years :)

Bruce Johnson
06-10-2011, 11:51 AM
Having taught 2 teenage boys now 21 and 23 (seems like ages ago) with 2 girls now on their way , now 12, I found it way easier to teach the boys the fundamentals of driving in an automatic. That way their concentration is on the road and the idiots driving around them, than on learning to drive a stick and to drive at the same time. Once they were used to the road and the car, they on their own, both learned to drive a stick in a friends car. At 19 and 21 I finally let them drive their D where they both immediately wracked up several speeding tickets! Now their car is stored awaiting the points to drop off their driving record. Lesson learned?? Speed bites!

Bruce-1420

Kevin and Kyle-5381 (someday)

Dangermouse
06-10-2011, 12:00 PM
Well all my cars are autos, so I don't really have a choice, though I would like to teach them stick-work too, but I like the idea of keeping it simple at the start.

robvanderveer
06-10-2011, 12:58 PM
Could you please summarize how 'learning to drive' in the States works?

Over here (in the Netherlands) you get a driving school with an instructor. The car is prepared with a double pedal box (everything except two steering wheels really lol), and after you've done your theory exam you learn to drive on a real road, with a real car, with real-world conditions. The trainer is there to brake, clutch or accelerate if necessary. Most often, you are trained to drive stick from day one, including watching the road and anticipating traffic. Only a very small percentage only learns to drive in an automatic. After about 25 lessons of roughly 30 minutes young drivers go for their first exam. During this exam, the extra pedals (except for the brakes) are removed from the car. If during the test he has to touch the brake, you flunked. If the exam is passed, you instantly have a full drivers license (well, next day really) and you are allowed to drive on your own, no need to have someone experienced with you.

Dangermouse
06-10-2011, 01:16 PM
As I did my learning in the UK, I am now learning about learning here :o

In Georgia anyway (may well be different in other states) You can get your learners permit at 15, but you cannot take the test for 366 days after you get your permit. To get the permit you take a computer test on the "Drivers Manual" (aka Highway Code in UK) - traffic signs, rules etc, plus an eye test. Also need a certificate of attendance from the school and completion of a drink/drug awareness course at the school.

A Learner has to have at least 40 hours of driving practice (with another licensed driver aka me) as well as at least 16 hours (or maybe 24) with an official Driving Instructor from a Driving School. So I have 80 hours to complete as a terrified passenger over the next year ;).

There is no requirement for any sort of "L" plate, or other signage, on the outside of the car, as in the UK, to notify other drivers that you are a learner and to expect the unexpected

(I recall in the UK, if you took your test in an auto, you got a licence that restricted you to only driving autos :o )

Then they take their actual driving test (not sure if there is another written part to that test next year or not). Although if it is raining, the test will be cancelled- honestly.

When they pass, they are limited to the number and type of passengers they can carry - only family members for the first year I think.

Renee_1632
06-10-2011, 11:01 PM
A Learner has to have at least 40 hours of driving practice (with another licensed driver aka me) as well as at least 16 hours (or maybe 24) with an official Driving Instructor from a Driving School.

They're making you all do that now? I took my test back in '08 (didn't get my license til I was 19, two days before boot camp...I'm such a loser :D ) and for me it wasn't required, but it DID make your car insurance lower. So as far as my family was concered, it was required. 8)

robvanderveer
06-12-2011, 04:50 AM
what are the percentages of people learning stick or auto?

Dangermouse
06-12-2011, 02:35 PM
I would guess at least 99 auto for every 1 stick. Very few people have only 1 car that is a stick shift that would force them to learn in a stick. Most mainstream cars are unavailable with a stick.

Dangermouse
03-20-2012, 02:12 PM
Update,

after a few months of in-action and 0 hours behind the wheel (hey, I'm not pushing them, certainly don't need the extra insurance cost), there seems to have been a new found urgency in them getting their test.

So we have been out and about in the Greater Johns Creek Metro area (don't say you haven't been warned) and we have come to the conclusion that we need some warning signs.

In the UK, by law, a learner driver must display one of these on the front and rear of the car:

http://www.quickonthenet.com/2010/53368/pix/gallery/L-Plate-Size.gif

It warns everyone around you that you may behave erratically, slow down unexpectedly, take forever to make a turn etc. It is usually a static-cling material that the parents can remove when they are driving (cars with this "L-plate" are limited to 45mph btw)

I have seen a couple of similar things on cars here, but most are of the semi-permenant bumper sticker type thing or even a magnetic version:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41J4euEGVkL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

I was very surprised that these aren't available in WalMart or Autozone. Got one ordered on-line, and am giving consideration installing one of these too:

http://www.wolo-mfg.com/7700-big.jpg

ccurzio
03-20-2012, 02:57 PM
This video contains everything you need to know:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QtuVLGeFM90

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QtuVLGeFM90