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View Full Version : Carbureting a DeLorean Requires *ZERO* Permanent Modifications



content22207
04-03-2012, 03:01 PM
One of the charges sometimes leveled against carburetion is that carbureting a DeLorean permanent modifies the car, reducing its resale value, precluding reversion back to K-Jet, etc.

That is absolutely completely 100% false. Other than a 12v line to the choke heater (which most owners get by simply plugging a quick connect into a disused ECU compartment connector and running a new wire out the tach signal grommet), carburetion requires absolutely no electrical connections whatsoever. Owners end up with a bunch of OEM harness connectors with nothing connected to them. I have piled all mine up in the corner of the engine compartment. I leave them their as an homage to K-Jet.

It does cause one pause and wonder why no one levels the same charge against extensive wiring modifications done by EFI converters, but anyway:

I just made an adapter that allows me to plug a Ford Duraspark ignition module into my stock wiring harness with no modification at all:
http://a5.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/532240_357107371001186_100001057778755_1063407_169 3325183_n.jpg
http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/554612_357107431001180_100001057778755_1063408_194 5175271_n.jpg

My car is currently running Ford ignition without a single modification to the original vehicle whatsoever:
http://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/526875_357107481001175_100001057778755_1063409_367 14872_n.jpg

I've even left the Bosch ignition module in place as a backup.

If its replacement PRV only had injector bungs, #5939 would be 100% revertible back to K-Jet if a future owner so desired. Every single OEM harness connector is still in the vehicle. The steel fuel lines are still in place (I've even capped them off to keep trash out). The accumulator is still underneath the car. I've removed the K-Jet fuel filter, but the steel line to it is still in place, zip tied to the frame to keep it from flopping around.

Some carbureted owners may decide to make difficult to revert modifications to their car (as I have done to #2508), but such mods are optional, not necessary. As stated, only one new wire is needed, and most owners simply choose to plug it into an disused harness connector (they also could use a quick connect into the unused hot start relay socket, but it's on the opposite side of the car).

Everything else just bolts on in place of the K-Jet manifold and fuel mixture unit.

Unbolt the carbureted manifold and carb, put K-Jet components back in their place, unplug the injector bungs (if the engine has them) and stick some injectors back in, reconnect the fuel lines and all those K-Jet electrical components (remember: no wiring changes were made), unplug the choke heater wire and pull it out, put a high pressure pump back in the tank, and in theory you could turn the key and drive away under K-Jet.

Carburetion is extremely quick to install (a couple of hours, most of which is spent removing K-Jet and running a new fuel line). Manifold and carb themselves can be removed in less than 5 minutes (3 minutes 18 seconds to be exact). Depending upon how long it takes to reinstall K-Jet, you could conceivably be back to stock in a couple of hours with no absolutely not a single shred of evidence that your car was ever carbureted other than a bunch of happy memories and perhaps a smiling picture or two.

Bill Robertson
#5939

content22207
04-03-2012, 04:31 PM
My homage to K-Jet:
http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/548049_364779640233959_100001057778755_1087063_509 154974_n.jpg

The new 12v choke heater wire is visible passing through the tach signal grommet (Red). Simply unplug it from a harness connector in the ECU compartment and pull it out -- no permanent modification whatsoever.

As you can clearly see, all pertinent K-Jet connectors are still in the car. No one can claim that I have modified my car in any way that precludes conversion back to K-Jet.

Except for the obvious lack of injector bungs of course....
http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/548049_364779660233957_100001057778755_1087064_125 4912983_n.jpg

Bill Robertson
#5939

Farrar
04-20-2012, 03:51 PM
Carbureting a DeLorean actually does involve two modifications which are not easily reversed: the throttle cable shield must be shortened, and the throttle cable itself shortened somewhat less. This procedure can be done with a Dremel tool and cutoff wheel.

I believe that NOS throttle cables and shields are available from vendors, but since reversing the procedure requires procuring new parts, I would argue that these two modifications qualify as "permanent."

By the way, Teflon-coated stainless steel wire rope is what I replaced my throttle cable with. I melted off some of the insulation on each end in order to facilitate installation of cable-stops.

stevedmc
04-20-2012, 04:26 PM
Carbureting a DeLorean actually does involve two modifications which are not easily reversed: the throttle cable shield must be shortened, and the throttle cable itself shortened somewhat less. This procedure can be done with a Dremel tool and cutoff wheel.

I believe that NOS throttle cables and shields are available from vendors, but since reversing the procedure requires procuring new parts, I would argue that these two modifications qualify as "permanent."

By the way, Teflon-coated stainless steel wire rope is what I replaced my throttle cable with. I melted off some of the insulation on each end in order to facilitate installation of cable-stops.

What he said. Thanks to Bill I am stuck with a car that will never have the correct throttle cable again.

Farrar
04-20-2012, 05:13 PM
Thanks to Bill I am stuck with a car that will never have the correct throttle cable again.

http://fc01.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2010/030/5/1/_sarcasm__HILARIOUS__sarcasm__by_TheJuraj.png