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Spittybug
01-14-2013, 03:59 PM
15878

Just saw this on ebay. I think it is VW/Audi G-Lader (G60). In digging, I think it came off a G60 Corrado which would make it a little small, but should give a few pounds of boost. Anyone familiar? I'd be really interested to see if this could be mounted in the opposite location to the a/c compressor. I don't have stock manifold or airbox to worry about. Rerouting the passenger side coolant hose wouldn't be a problem.

Of course, I have no specs on such a unit, so at this stage it is just daydreaming. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G-Lader
Update.... before I could even finish this email, I bought it. :mallet: I had to, it was <$100 delivered and doing some quick checking, they seem to go for several times that. The seller had it under turbochargers, not superchargers and it only had one other bidder! I either got really lucky and now have a project to work on, or I now have something to try and flip.............................

Anyone up for a challenge?

Rich W
01-14-2013, 05:42 PM
15878

Just saw this on ebay. I think it is VW/Audi G-Lader (G60). In digging, I think it came off a G60 Corrado which would make it a little small, but should give a few pounds of boost. Anyone familiar? I'd be really interested to see if this could be mounted in the opposite location to the a/c compressor. I don't have stock manifold or airbox to worry about. Rerouting the passenger side coolant hose wouldn't be a problem.

Of course, I have no specs on such a unit, so at this stage it is just daydreaming. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G-Lader
Update.... before I could even finish this email, I bought it. :mallet: I had to, it was <$100 delivered and doing some quick checking, they seem to go for several times that. The seller had it under turbochargers, not superchargers and it only had one other bidder! I either got really lucky and now have a project to work on, or I now have something to try and flip.............................

Anyone up for a challenge?

Hi Owen,

I have had a Corrado G60 for about 19 years now, so I know a bit about these unique little superchargers. Like any mechanical part,
it would be good to try to get some history on it (estimated mileage, original, rebuilt ... and if rebuilt, stock or modified).

I currently have a spare 1.8L with a G60 that I had considered putting into a DeLorean, either as rear engine or mid-engine setup.
A guy in my local VW club claimed to have modified his 1.8L G60 setup to produce over 400hp (with some dyno testing to back it up).

15882

My Corrado happens to have a very unique story behind it, since it was first used as a Pace Car for the Schwinn Cycling Team back
in the early 90's (1991-1994), along with a Vanagon Team Van that travelled behind the riding team while they were "road training".

I worked at Schwinn Corporate and the girl who was in charge of Marketing did not drive stick, so I drove the Corrado to several
Schwinn sponsored events, including MTV Daytona Beach 1991 Spring Break. Yeah, it was a tough job, but someone had to do it.

If I get time, I will post the whole story sometime in the future, but bottom line is that I have personally owned the car since 1994
and it currently has about 100K miles on it. Excellent power for its size and great power to weight ratio overall.

Later,
Rich W.

Ron
01-14-2013, 10:44 PM
Cool Beans !

Want me to change the title to "Supercharger"? lol

Spittybug
01-14-2013, 10:52 PM
Cool Beans !

Want me to change the title to "Supercharger"? lol

Oops.... Yes please. Looks like that mistake is contagious.

Spittybug
01-18-2013, 12:23 PM
Preliminary fit looks promising. I'll have to move the location of the coolant overflow bottle and the coolant hose that runs from the passenger side of the water pump to the radiator. It looks like I'll have plenty of room for the supercharger itself.

I think the location of the intercooler will be a challenge. Rear wall with standoffs and electric fans? Maybe hanging down under the engine cradle side frame? I'd be interested in hearing how you guys that have turbos have them mounted. How big? How's the air flow across them? Have you measured the temp drop across them?

The other big challenge will be converting to a ribbed belt system. I know some have done this already. Does the group have any knowledge of what crossover pulleys may exist to fit? A good source of aftermarket pulleys and belts?

The actual act of plumbing this up doesn't look like it would take very long at all. Figuring it all out and finding all the required parts however could take a while. I'd prefer not to have the car out of commission while I work on these aspects. It may make sense to flip my throttle body around to make plumbing a straighter shot.

Oh, one last dumb(?) question. Probably for Rich since he's familiar with the G-Lader. Does it matter which way it spins? I wouldn't even know how to go about changing the rotation :headscratch: if I'm backwards.

Nicholas R
01-18-2013, 01:14 PM
The direction of spinning is going to determine which direction the supercharger is pushing the air. That being said, there are very few engines in the world that do not spin clockwise, I doubt that is set up for one of them.

vwdmc16
01-18-2013, 09:52 PM
...... Anyone up for a challenge?



Accepted!!!! I have a far away planned blower project too, However I have too many other projects needing immediate attention so it will stay a dream for awhile. Basically its a Toyota SC14 blower off of a '95-97 Previa, its very similar to the 1st gen MR2 blower( SC12) but this is 200ccs larger and has a electromagnetic clutch on the pulley just like a AC compressor( Previa only made its 7psi of boost at full throttle). I have found a few at wrecking yards and by convincing them its an AC compressor it was only $50.

They are great units however they have a flaw, there are rubber lip seals on the rotor shafts that tear and allow the gear oil to seep into the intake, These seals are a strange and unique size and to get them out the main bearings have to be pulled and are usually damaged/destroyed in the process, again these are unique sizes too and Toyota does not sell them. So this is a large issue if the seals are worn.

This one has about 220k miles on it and I have another with 300k but like I said these only rotate at WOT and are bypassed the rest of the time so who knows how much they have been used.

http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c396/vwdmc16/dmc/IMG_0842.jpg
http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c396/vwdmc16/dmc/IMG_0845.jpg


I just finished reassembling this one after I sandblasted and degreased it. Looks good now. Here is apic of a mock up I did too, It would be a tight fit under the engine lid and also needs a 6 rib belt. Can the Eagle Cranks and pulley bolt on the 2.8? DPI makes a kit I think.

http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c396/vwdmc16/dmc/SSPX0034.jpg

Spittybug
01-18-2013, 10:38 PM
I have not seen those before Wolff. Wouldn't you want it kicking in before WOT? One of the advantages of a supercharger over a turbo is the low end torque, right?
You are going to have to solve the intercooler issue too. I probably have more room than you do since you still have the stock manifold.
If you find any more info on the pulleys and belts, I'd love to hear.

Owen.

vwdmc16
01-18-2013, 11:31 PM
Yes I will set it up to engage most of the time, maybe only disengage at idle to smooth it out. I could experiment with it or change the pulley so its solid. In stock form the Previa has a bypass valve that is pulse width modulated to control boost and smooth the transition from N/A to boost. Ive never driven a blown Previa so I can personally say if that system works or not.

surely someone can chime in about the EP pulleys.

Spittybug
01-19-2013, 11:59 AM
I'm looking for the ID of the crank pulley, water pump pulley and any helpful information on how to put a grooved belt on our A/C compressors! If someone has these lying around and could give me and Wolff some quick measurements, we'd appreciate it.

Dare I even ask if anyone knows of any engines with the same dimensions to go part picking from?

Thanks.

Owen.

krustydmc
01-19-2013, 07:49 PM
DeLorean G60.....I have two G60 with all the piping sitting in my basement for the last 5 years, i was keeping them for my 1990 Corrado , but the corrado is 23 years old and the original G-Lader is still in perfect condition...any idea if its been done ?


15933

vwdmc16
01-19-2013, 09:22 PM
Owen, Do you think that blower can pump enough air for our engines? They were made for 1.8L not 2.8L. Sure you could spin it faster to get more output but what is the maximum speed those can be turned? My blower was made for a 2.4L engine and its max rpm is 14,000.

Spittybug
01-19-2013, 10:40 PM
My boost desires are modest; 6 lbs maybe? I'm not looking to drag race, just improve the low end and certainly don't want to break any internals. I've been reading up on these G-Laders and it sounds like mid teens lbs. of boost was "normal" (Wiki says 11.6 with stock pulley). So, in my little mind, the 2.8 liter versus 1.8 liter is about 50% more air flow, thus letting me get my 6 lbs. I could be in left field as I've never done this before!

What really motivated me was the quieter operation, the size, the ease of attaching the plumbing.....Per some reading I found: "upside is it's a centrifugal and it builds boost with RPM as opposed to being a positive displacement like a roots style that makes full boost right off throttle... downside is when over-spun or poorly maintained they LOVE to grenade, and boost is dependent on the condition of the apex strips that seal the two vanes against each other. That tiny timing cog belt is also a maintenance item and if it snaps or otherwise lets go the charger goes out of time and grenades."

I suppose another name for intercooler would be "shrapnel catcher".

Krusty; are you saying that your original G-Later is still going strong on you Corrado? Has it been rebuilt? How many miles? If you've got 2 more units on the shelf, you could be a popular guy if this prototype works!

I tore the unit down today and inspected it. Not bad at all. It needs new apex strips and since I don't know the age of it, common sense says to replace the bearings and oil seals. No obvious internal damage other than a common "chip" out of the end of one of the vanes. I've seen a guy that repaired his with JB weld, but I'd be really wary of that! I'm going to find out if it can just be ground down and sacrifice a bit of blowby, or if I need a quick weld. This is a few hundred dollar refresh, so first things first, a more careful fitting in the car and determination that all the other aspects of the project can be done. Getting ribbed crank pulley and water pump pulley ought to be doable, but I need to find out if our A/C compressors can swap out the v belt pulley for a ribbed one. Need to find suitable bosses for tensioners. The location of an intercooler still needs to be figured out.

Nicholas R
01-20-2013, 04:17 AM
The location of an intercooler still needs to be figured out.

Do you really need an intercooler? Normally I would encourage people to use intercoolers but if you're planning on running only 6 lbs of boost, it seems to me like it's almost overkill. The stage III doesn't use an intercooler because it too runs so little boost. A turbo pretty much always needs an intercooler both from the compression and the exposure to exhaust heat, but with a supercharger it really just depends on your setup whether it's needed.

Intercoolers are only really necessary if you're running about 9psi or more of boost or more.

The purpose of the intercooler is to offset the increase in intake air temperature caused by compressing it by cooling it with a heat exchanger; but 6 lbs of boost doesn't really do that much.

Consider for instance:
Ambient air temp - 85F- (T1)
Atmospheric pressure - 14.7psi - (P1)
Boost pressure - 14.7psi+6psi=20.7psi - (P2)

T2/P2=T1/P1
T2=(T1/P1)*P2
T2=(85F/14.7psi)*20.7psi
T2= 119.7F

On an 85 degree day, at full boost (6psi), your intake air temp is only about 120F. Sure it is an increase in temperature but is it worth the plumbing of the intercooler? I suppose if you ever wanted to change your pulley ratio and really run some boost into that engine in the future (10psi perhaps?), it would be nice to have the intercooler, but for 6psi I dont think it would be worth the trouble.

Just my 2 cents :D

krustydmc
01-20-2013, 11:18 AM
my corrado is 170 000km ( about 100 000 mi) g-lader not rebuit....the car have syntec oil since new and the car is not modified.i think its the 2 main reason for G60 breaking.....i'm not sure if i want to modified my D , if i do , i can do a twin G60 :headbang:

Spittybug
01-20-2013, 12:45 PM
Time for reality check..... Nic? Rich? Wolff? Dave? (good catch-all name there for lots of Delorean-smart people :tongue:)

I've found data that says the G-Lader will pump 350 cfm at ~12,500 rpms (SC rpms) on its stock pulley/stock SC pulley ratio of 1.79. Since the output on this style of SC is linear with RPM, that comes to ~.028 CFM/RPM. This is my "given" data for my calculations.

Assume therefore that I replace our stock crank pulley with one of 139.7 mm for sake of argument. I can always modify the sizes and math if I need a different one to get the ratios I'm using below.

At 6,000 RPM and assuming a volumetric efficiency of 85%, this calculates to air flow of 257 cfm for our stock, NA engine. Sound right? CFM=(RPM*CID*VE)/3456

At that same 6,000 RPM, the G-Lader would pump out ~301 cfm. (10,746 RPM at SC *.0279)

Am I correct in saying boost (psi) = % increase in CFM * 14.7 ??? I think that works mathematically since any boost is relative to atmospheric=14.7 psi

If so, the math is (301 cfm - 257 cfm) / 257 cfm * 14.7 = 2.5 psi boost ......minimal

Changing the pulley ratio to 2.15 by putting on a SC pulley that is 13mm smaller, makes the SC output ~361 cfm at 6,000 engine RPM while keeping the SC right below spec maximum rpm. This equates to boost of 6 psi doing the same calcs.

So, it would appear that although the G-Lader is a bit small if one wants to really push the RPM envelope of a high RPM car of our displacement, keeping the car RPMs below 6,000 and increasing the pulley ratio moves this supercharger into a good boost range for a Delorean. The reality is I'll probably never take the car above 5,000 RPM, so in theory a 2.54 ratio (55 mm pulley) keeps the 5,000 car RPM to the spec max RPM for the SC (<13,000 RPM) and generates 9.7 psi boost. Megasquirt has rev limiting capability that could be used as safeguards.

See any fatal flaws in the logic? I wouldn't be pushing up to 9.7 by the way! 6 would be fine I think. What are our turbo guys doing without any modifications to the internals? And Nic, your temp calcs make sense to me. No intercooler would be so much simpler.....I've seen finned intercooler piping that would actually give a little bit of cooling on the way to the intake. I'd definitely want a debris catcher downstream of the SC in case it decides to grenade however!

Bitsyncmaster
01-20-2013, 03:19 PM
Don't you need to use lower compression when turbo or super charging?

vwdmc16
01-20-2013, 03:46 PM
Stock 8.8:1 is pretty good for mild boost levels.

kenny
01-20-2013, 06:05 PM
FYI,
There is a company in the UK that do an upgrade to the G60 supercharger.
This is a common upgrade for Corrado owners.
May be of interest to anyone looking at installing one.
http://www.jabbasport.com/superchargers.php

Rich W
01-21-2013, 01:58 PM
Time for reality check..... Nic? Rich? Wolff? Dave? (good catch-all name there for lots of Delorean-smart people :tongue:)


Hi Owen,

I took the weekend off from Forum activities, in favor of house-hold tasks like replacing a bathroom sink fixture, etc., but at least
the new sink has a brushed nickel finish (almost brushed stainless, lol).

Anyway, as long as you called for a Reality Check, I thought I would ask for some of the basic goals for this project...at least the
Top 3 or Top 5 Goals, including such items as low end performance, reliability, cost, ease of install, etc. Sorry if I had missed this
list along the way, but it may be a good time to make or update a list, then prioritize it, based on your needs, budget, time, etc.

If Low End Performance increases is near the top of your list, then the G60 may not be the best choice. While I like the G60 and
other centrifugal superchargers, better low end gains are acheived with Roots type or Screw Type superchargers. However, if you
are looking for gains throughout your RPM range, the centrifugal type G60 is the better choice, as this supercharger builds pressure
exponentially as RPM increases. Roots and Screw type superchargers build pressure more linear, from low to mid range RPM's only.

Reliability and Cost can go hand-in-hand, when considering New vs. Used parts, but over-all, most superchargers do have "useful"
life-spans from the used market, though many need service prior to re-use, especially if they have sat for years without use.

Ease of install is never "easy" the first time you custom fabricate a project, but subsequent fabrications may go easier after the
first one is completed and operational. While I agree that you should try not to over-complicate a project just for the sake of it
being complex, on the other hand, you do not want to simplify things too much or cut too many corners unnecessarily. Case in
point would be whether to Intercool or not Intercool the proposed G60 install.

Given your location (bloody hot and humid Texas), I would lean toward the Intercool option, but again, your budget and your use
may also impact the need to Intercool. While I have only taken a few Summer trips to VW car shows to Arkansas and Florida with
my G60 Corrado, I would guess that the stock G60 Intercooler made a significant difference in performance when the air temps are
in the 90's and triple digits (with high humidity) than if I had been blasting down the interstate without an Intercooler.

Yes, you still need to take a close look at all the numbers (performance and cost) and get your priority list in order, to help with the
decision making process, before you get to far into this type of project, but I think you are already asking most of the right questions.

As a side note, there is a unique characteristic to the G60 centrifugal superchargers that some folks may "enjoy" while others may
find it to be less than desireable. Since the G60 builds boost with RPM over a very wide range, spirited downshifting may offer some
surprizing results when you do not expect it. Downshifting in most NA applications results in slowing down a vehicle, depending upon
displacement and other factors, while the increased RPM's in downshifting also causes more boost with the G60...a unique feeling.

Personally, I like the idea, but if the G60 will not acheive the desired results, there are new twin screw superchargers that have the
same size "footprint" as the G60, with more low end boost, like the BahnBrennen Motosports unit. www.bahnbrenner.com

As for me, I am still looking at another unique supercharger application for the PRV (from 2.5L up to 3.0L) which only needs time and
money to get completed...maybe this will make it into my DeLorean Roadster project?

Later,
Rich W.

adam_knox
01-21-2013, 02:25 PM
Hey gang,
I've been following this thread out of pure curiosity and ya'll have started me on a knowledge hunt about superchargers. I've learned quite a bit! (although that's not saying much considering I knew nil before this topic was started! =P)
I just had a few "practical" clarifications so I can sort of imagine the impact this set up will have:
1. I'm assuming you need to replace the K-Jet and install a computerized EFI to manage the new fuel flow. My question is, will the supercharger be running all the time, or would it kick on just during acceleration, in say 1st or 2nd gear?
2. Would this proposed set up be expected to shorten the life span of the PRV? (Assuming no real malfunctions in the supercharger system)
3. I keep reading about "boost." How noticeable would one experience a 6 lb. boost. in a D? Would it noticeably decrease the 0-60 time?

Good luck with the designing and install!

Spittybug
01-21-2013, 05:47 PM
See inline:


Hey gang,
I've been following this thread out of pure curiosity and ya'll have started me on a knowledge hunt about superchargers. I've learned quite a bit! (although that's not saying much considering I knew nil before this topic was started! =P)
I just had a few "practical" clarifications so I can sort of imagine the impact this set up will have:
1. I'm assuming you need to replace the K-Jet and install a computerized EFI to manage the new fuel flow. My question is, will the supercharger be running all the time, or would it kick on just during acceleration, in say 1st or 2nd gear? In theory K-jet could stay on since you are simply pushing more air in and letting the stock system add more fuel, but I don't know how much "room" there is with the stock setup when it comes to injector capacity.
2. Would this proposed set up be expected to shorten the life span of the PRV? (Assuming no real malfunctions in the supercharger system) I hope not!
3. I keep reading about "boost." How noticeable would one experience a 6 lb. boost. in a D? Would it noticeably decrease the 0-60 time? Tough to explain. Ever ridden in a turbo'd car?

Good luck with the designing and install!

Spittybug
01-21-2013, 06:10 PM
To answer your questions Rich; I weigh several factors.

Cost. Everything is possible with a fat checkbook, but that's not the fun part of the hobby to me. I picked up the G-Lader for $100 delivered. Once I opened it up I found one minor area that needs a repair and BBM has already said it isn't a problem. While I could cut corners and not rebuild the unit, I think that would be foolish. If the rest of the project lights "show green", I'll spend the $500 or so for a repair/rebuild. The remaining cost is some minimal piping, some pulleys and a bypass valve. Entire project for what I hope will be under ~$900 doesn't seem bad. If I went with a bigger/higher boost unit, I could get more bang, but the bucks would also be 2-3x.
Coolness to be able to do it! "Yeah, I designed and added electronic fuel injection and slapped a turbocharger on my Delorean".
Time. I'm in no hurry on the entire project, but want to have everything figured out so the actual install goes quickly and the car isn't out of commission long.
Performance. I want to see and feel a benefit, but am not looking to push any performance envelopes or meet any goal. Keeping the cost low and enjoying the process is more important to me than keeping up with any Jones at the car show.
Education. I like learning and applying what I've learned. Others have found out that I also then enjoy passing on that knowledge to their benefit.
Reliability. I don't think adding this extra sub system increases it, but I don't want to materially reduce it.


The point you made about the higher RPMs during shifting.... interesting. I assume that is because it is vacuum increase that activates the bypass and you don't increase vacuum when upshifting, just at idle or decel. It can't be a problem though, is it? MS has a programmable output that could be wired to a solenoid to control the bypass. A drop in RPM, a certain change in manifold pressure or other parameters could be used to open it....food for thought.

Did you get a chance to digest my calculations and assumptions? That's where I'd like to make sure I'm in the right ballpark. Thanks.

Owen.

adam_knox
01-21-2013, 06:11 PM
Thanks for the response! I've driven in a few cars, like a turbo MR2, but I was never really paying much attention to when the turbo kicked in, just sort of associated any pickup with the actual car rather than a specific component. I guess I was just curious about the before/after comparison. Didn't know if it would be an appreciable difference to an unsuspecting driver. I always am in awe of the skill, planning and problem solving that goes into making modifications like this. :thumbup:

Rich W
01-22-2013, 12:43 PM
Did you get a chance to digest my calculations and assumptions? That's where I'd like to make sure I'm in the right ballpark. Thanks.

Owen.

Hi Owen,

I did take a quick look at your calculations, but I think they apply to the Roots and Screw type superchargers and not the centrifugal type,
which includes the G60. As I mentioned in my last reply (somewhat buried in paragraph 3), my understanding is the Roots and Screw type
superchargers produce boost in a linear manner, while the centrifugal type, like the G60, produces boost exponentially as RPM increases.
Since I rarely have extra, spare time for "fun with math", someone else may want to step in, to verify the appropriate G60 calculations.

As for the G60 boost "side effects", I am not sure if they reach the "problem" level with stock boost levels, but the feeling can be a bit
un-nerving when you do not expect it, like down-shifting for a tight turn and then realize you are still getting an extra "boost push" in
the middle of the turn. It can get a little tricky in the rain, snow and icy road conditions, but the front wheel drive makes it rather easy
to correct, however, transferring this to a rear wheel drive, rear engine car that can get "tail happy" may become a more tricky issue.

Best example case (in my Corrado) is when downshifting into 2nd gear, with RPM's above 3,000 making a turn between 45 and 90 degrees.
Obviously, the more sweeping turns are less of a problem, while the 90 degree corners (on crowned roads) can get very interesting.

Later,
Rich W.

Rich W
01-22-2013, 02:27 PM
<snip>

3. I keep reading about "boost." How noticeable would one experience a 6 lb. boost. in a D? Would it noticeably decrease the 0-60 time?

<snip>



IIRC, the current DMCH Stage III offering is in the 6 lb. boost range (+/- 1 lb.) and from my test drives in the Stage III Demo Car, their
is more of a better "seat of the pants" feeling (with the added torque) than a significant decrease in the 0-60 time vs. the Stage II.

The boost power kicks in quickly from just off Idle RPM's through at least the upper 4,000 to 5,000 RPM range (I did not push it past 5K)
and this really is a good "practical boost range" for most spirited driving endeavors, for primarily public road use (not just the race track).

Later,
Rich W.

dustybarn
01-22-2013, 08:51 PM
Hi Owen,

I did take a quick look at your calculations, but I think they apply to the Roots and Screw type superchargers and not the centrifugal type,
which includes the G60. As I mentioned in my last reply (somewhat buried in paragraph 3), my understanding is the Roots and Screw type
superchargers produce boost in a linear manner, while the centrifugal type, like the G60, produces boost exponentially as RPM increases.
Since I rarely have extra, spare time for "fun with math", someone else may want to step in, to verify the appropriate G60 calculations.

I believe, IIRC, that the G-lader is positive-displacement like a Roots or Lysholm or the old Judson vane superchargers. The McCulloch/Paxton was a centrifugal compressor like you describe.

Spittybug
01-23-2013, 09:48 AM
You are correct Dusty. There is even a picture of the inner workings of one on the Wiki site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Positive_displacement_pump#Positive_displacement_p ump

Spittybug
02-03-2013, 12:40 PM
Never having done so, I'm curious as to where to tap the PRV for an oil line to the supercharger. And return?

dustybarn
02-03-2013, 01:41 PM
The BAE system got its oil by removing the oil pressure sending unit and adding a tee. I suppose you could do the same thing on the other bank at the oil pressure warning light drilling as well. The return is drilled into the top surface of the sump. The BAE instruction sheet is available as a scanned .PDF, but I don't have the link at my fingertips right now.

Spittybug
02-03-2013, 02:17 PM
Found it and saved it, thanks.

I'm tagging all my bases before starting. I need to find a radiator hose that does a a quick 90% followed by another quick 90% so that I can direct it over to the driver's side from the passenger side of the water pump. I think I'll just use 3' lengths of hose to follow the path of the driver's side hose, down past the fuel filter to the underside of the tranny. By rotating the passenger side pipe that leads up front, I can get it to angle toward the fuel filter. I'm going to relocate the overflow tank to the driver's side of the firewall since I have no ballast resistors or the other crap in the way.

Once clear of radiator stuff, fabricating a mounting bracket mockup will be much easier. I think I'll be able to keep the AC on a V pulley and add a ribbed belt for the other pieces. The air piping is pretty straightforward, including the bypass valve.

Anyone got a catalog or knowledge of radiator hoses to find the 1 1/2" to 1 1/4", 180* bend that I need?

cineman
02-03-2013, 02:23 PM
The BAE system got its oil by removing the oil pressure sending unit and adding a tee. I suppose you could do the same thing on the other bank at the oil pressure warning light drilling as well. The return is drilled into the top surface of the sump. The BAE instruction sheet is available as a scanned .PDF, but I don't have the link at my fingertips right now.

Is not good to use the oil warning light hole for taking oil pressure: the oil warning sensor makes also a "restriction" in a hole in the duct wich discharge pressure, so if you just remove it and put a nipples or a T or a different sensor in the same threading you will have a discharge point for oil pressure and so a bad low oil pressure, wich can makes very bad damages...
You can use instead the closed hole above it, the one wich is closed from factory, or take the pressure from the other side where you have the oil pressure sensor.
For the oil return, you can weld a thread fit in the oil sump, higher you can, or in the engine lower cranckase support, on a side, like the BAE system.

vwdmc16
02-03-2013, 03:10 PM
Is all of the plumbing going to be rubber? no metal tubing?

Spittybug
02-03-2013, 03:53 PM
Is all of the plumbing going to be rubber? no metal tubing?

Some metal; just enough to tie rubber pieces together in the engine bay, to provide the connection for the overflow and to provide some solid points for mounting brackets.

Spittybug
02-05-2013, 12:12 PM
Sometimes it's just better to be lucky than good. I went to Advance Auto and asked to look through their radiator hoses. Within 30 seconds we found this bad boy which has a nice tight radius to bend back towards the driver's side. Now of course with that kind of luck we KNOW it just couldn't be 1 1/2" ID to fit the water pump......but it is! Wooooo hoooo.

I'm still sourcing straight run hosing and/or aluminum pipe to get the rest done up.

Anyone got some old pipes (don't want to butcher my otherwise good condition ones if I don't have to) they wish to contribute (cheap I hope) to the project? I think duplicating the same path down the driver's side will work. Getting a section of the aluminum tube that includes the overflow bottle tie in nipple would be really good!

cineman
02-05-2013, 03:43 PM
Sometimes it's just better to be lucky than good. I went to Advance Auto and asked to look through their radiator hoses. Within 30 seconds we found this bad boy which has a nice tight radius to bend back towards the driver's side. Now of course with that kind of luck we KNOW it just couldn't be 1 1/2" ID to fit the water pump......but it is! Wooooo hoooo.

I'm still sourcing straight run hosing and/or aluminum pipe to get the rest done up.

Anyone got some old pipes (don't want to butcher my otherwise good condition ones if I don't have to) they wish to contribute (cheap I hope) to the project? I think duplicating the same path down the driver's side will work. Getting a section of the aluminum tube that includes the overflow bottle tie in nipple would be really good!

i dont quite understand where you want to make the water hoses go , and what route ?
Also, very important remember that if you make a point in the silicon water HIGHER than the thermostat purge, you could have possible air problem and difficulties to purge air, if you not make a purge knob in the highest point.
I used an higher water hose in a first setup, but i really had problems, and had to put pressure in the system to purge air, so after i made all metal hoses, stainless steel, with a purge hole with nut.

Spittybug
02-05-2013, 04:14 PM
Both cooling lines (in/out of water pump) will follow the stock pathway on the driver's side. Once under the car they rejoin their normal configuration. In the engine bay however, this frees up the entire passenger side from any hoses so that I have unobstructed space to mount the supercharger. I intend to keep the air purge nipple I have on the water pump, or as you say, put in another one.

Spittybug
02-06-2013, 05:43 PM
I can only plan and mock up for so long before I just jump in and do it. Or at least start....



I removed the passenger side pipe that comes up to the engine bay, the overflow bottle and the associated plumbing.
I rotated the passenger side tube that runs along the frame on the underside of the car so that it now angles towards the driver's side.
I installed the new hose on the water pump (hich is closer to 1.75" than 1.5", but the hose stretched over it with a bit of work).
I flipped the passenger side pipe with the overflow tank connection over and used it on the driver's side. I don't see any reason why having the nipple facing downwards should make any difference once it has a hose on it and is reconnected to the overflow tank above it.
I used the metal standoff to hold the pipe in place.
Next step is to connect this engine bay piping down to the end of the pipe by the transmission. I could simply use another #58 (DMCH part) and parallel the one there, but then I'd have to add hose sections and clamps at both ends. I may just go with a 40" length of hose, probably the corrugated, flexible kind eliminating some connections and cheaper: http://www.oreillyauto.com/site/c/detail/GATC/25269/N2532.oap?ck=Search_N2532_GAT_-1_460&mn=Gates(R)&mc=GAT&pt=N2532&ppt=C0075
Lastly, I need to connect the new water pump hose to the radius section of the flipped pipe. This is 1 1/2" to 1 1/4", which I believe I can also get in the same flexible tubing, ~20" length. http://www.oreillyauto.com/site/c/detail/GATC/25305/N2532.oap?ck=Search_N2532_GAT_-1_460&mn=Gates(R)&mc=GAT&pt=N2532&ppt=C0075 One small piece of aluminum tubing to mate them and done.

krado94
02-26-2013, 06:54 AM
as a fellow corrado owner, I've owned 5 including a 95 Canadian spec. If you are still planning on using the G60, if you don't know the history I would get it rebuilt from a good tuner. When I had my 91 Corrado G60 I kept putting off getting mine rebuilt. So the belt broke and push a piece of metal through the center of the case of the charger. Also you get a 68mm smaller pulley for a nice upgrade. some other G60 tuners are www.bahnbrenner.com or http://www.kompressorkanada.ca . Here is a pic of my current 94 corrado VR6


http://pic70.picturetrail.com:80/VOL1871/10835740/23032703/400882357.jpg

Spittybug
02-26-2013, 06:33 PM
I certainly do plan on having it rebuilt. I pulled it apart and it has a small, repairable chip in the center displacer. I want new apex seals, bearings, belt and testing done. I'm holding off sending it in until I'm further down the road of making it all work. I'm just waiting on one more fitting from Jegs and my coolant hoses and fuel filter relocation portion of the job will be complete. The next step is the tough one; figuring out exactly how to mount the G-lader. I have the space now, but getting the right "frame" to hold it in place will be a bit of a fabrication challenge. Then the pulleys. Then the oil line and air ducting. If all that comes together, the $500 or so to rebuild will be a no brainer to make sure it is in good shape. Having the EFI system in place and the ability to retard the advance (oxymoron?) so I don't knock and ping the engine to death is a BIG advantage over stock. With a dense cylinder charge the spark travels faster through the mixture and pre-detonation is a real killer of boosted cars. I was talking with Stephen Wynn at DMCH the other day and that was his only real concern. He's very comfortable with the engine innards and their ability to handle modest boost.

Spittybug
03-06-2013, 05:35 PM
Slow progress as I was waiting on parts and preoccupied with the MyLifeBridge card launch.

I was trying to get a banjo fitting to work on the top of the fuel filter but it didn't like EFI type pressures. The nipple that slides into the inside of the rubber was only 1/4" long and not threaded in any way. It relied on the compression of the nut over the top of the metal braided hose to squeeze it. I'm sure it's fine for low pressure, but I couldn't get it to seal satisfactorily at 45lbs. Instead, I went with a tight radius bend that has the threaded nipple. So, the fuel filter is relocated to a convenient location and the coolant stuff all goes down the driver side now. The next challenge is figuring out the mounting for the supercharger. This is the part I'm no good at!