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Thread: How to: Replace fuse block

  1. #11
    One of those purists you keep hearing about. sdg3205's Avatar
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    May not have been your fault. Fuse 7 is prone to overheating.
    Dave

    Here, somewhere.


  2. #12
    My friends think I'm nuts jawn101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dtavres View Post
    #7 just melted in my block

    I'm going to blame myself for not tucking the block cover away neatly. I was told by DMC to just take the cover off, as the block get hot, and there's no reason to keep the plastic cover on. But... I only laid it 'on top' of the other wires there, and apparently when I put the wood back down, the cover was pushing against #7. I'm guessing the heat build-up caused it to fry Dang it. My own stupidity. UNLESS, there's some other reason this happened? Anyone?

    Attachment 46116Attachment 46117Attachment 46118
    Well, it happened because the fuse block is poor quality, there was bad conductivity to that fuse, and the pump drew more current than it should. Same reason it happens on every car. Check your grounds and replace your fuse block... it's an incredibly important piece of proactive maintenance on every one of these cars. Unfortunately it's now become reactive repair on yours.
    Jon
    1981 DMC-12 #02100. July 1981. 5-speed, black, grooved w/flap.
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  3. #13
    Senior Member DMC-81's Avatar
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    Hi Dave,

    Sorry that fuse #7 took out your block and cover. .

    I had fuse 10 and 11 melted in mine when I got the car, so I know what you mean. I just did the block replacement in July. I was contemplating skipping the connector replacement and just doing the plastic block, but in the end, I was very glad that I took the time to replace all of the parts in the kit, because thanks to new connectors the fuses now have a much tighter grip in the block.... just to reinforce what Jon stated.^

    That said, I waited to replace the block until I verified that all electrical circuits were working, with components replaced as necessary, and grounds checked & cleaned.

    In the meantime, you can install an inline fuse holder to get you back up and running. That is what the PO did, and it worked in my case until I was ready to do the replacement.

    One tip if you are going to replace yours, there is an inexpensive tool to release the connectors that I wish I had known about as it would have saved me a lot of time. Someone posted about it here afterwards.
    Last edited by DMC-81; 09-04-2016 at 02:03 PM.
    Dana

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  4. #14
    10515 dtavres's Avatar
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    Thanks all.

    After looking at many other posts online, and reading here, my gut feeling is to just replace the whole block.

    I'm technical (and anal) enough to do it myself, but I'm going to see what DMC charges first.

    It looks like most people who have replaced the block themselves take 3-4 hours, so my hope is that DMC can do it in 2 hours. If it's more than that, I'll do it myself.

    In the event that I do it myself, I see that it's better/easier/fast to just clip the wires as close to the block as possible, and to remove the passenger seat. (Labelling is obvious)

    I don't have the tools or space to remove the passenger seat, so will likely just be a contortionist for a day or two.

    I'm also thinking that I'll just pull 1 wire/fuse at a time, put on the new connectors, and put it in the new block immediately, then move to the next wire/fuse.

    Anything else?
    Dave Tavres | #10515 | Orange, CA | Southern California | www.DMC10515.com |

  5. #15
    My friends think I'm nuts jawn101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dtavres View Post
    Thanks all.

    After looking at many other posts online, and reading here, my gut feeling is to just replace the whole block.

    I'm technical (and anal) enough to do it myself, but I'm going to see what DMC charges first.

    It looks like most people who have replaced the block themselves take 3-4 hours, so my hope is that DMC can do it in 2 hours. If it's more than that, I'll do it myself.

    In the event that I do it myself, I see that it's better/easier/fast to just clip the wires as close to the block as possible, and to remove the passenger seat. (Labelling is obvious)

    I don't have the tools or space to remove the passenger seat, so will likely just be a contortionist for a day or two.

    I'm also thinking that I'll just pull 1 wire/fuse at a time, put on the new connectors, and put it in the new block immediately, then move to the next wire/fuse.

    Anything else?
    I think you are underestimating how long it takes.... And in my case, there was no way to move the wires from point A to B without removing them all. The harness is too short.

    You only need a 13mm socket to remove your passenger seat... If you don't have one of those, you're going to have a very tough time working on your car as about 75% of the nuts are 13mm.
    Jon
    1981 DMC-12 #02100. July 1981. 5-speed, black, grooved w/flap.
    restoration log, April 2012 to present
    restoration log, March 2011 to April 2012
    full and detailed photo restoration log

  6. #16
    10515 dtavres's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jawn101 View Post
    I think you are underestimating how long it takes.... And in my case, there was no way to move the wires from point A to B without removing them all. The harness is too short. You only need a 13mm socket to remove your passenger seat... If you don't have one of those, you're going to have a very tough time working on your car as about 75% of the nuts are 13mm.
    Thanks jawn...

    How long did it take you to replace the block, start to finish? Did you remove the seat?

    It *LOOKS* like there's enough wire in the harness to pull things up, if I remove the tape and carefully pull things apart. But... I don't know actually know what I'm talking about
    DSC02489 (Large).jpg
    Dave Tavres | #10515 | Orange, CA | Southern California | www.DMC10515.com |

  7. #17
    My friends think I'm nuts jawn101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dtavres View Post
    Thanks jawn...

    How long did it take you to replace the block, start to finish? Did you remove the seat?

    It *LOOKS* like there's enough wire in the harness to pull things up, if I remove the tape and carefully pull things apart. But... I don't know actually know what I'm talking about
    DSC02489 (Large).jpg
    If you're willing to cut and remove everything and retape it, it may be different. I did take my seat out and it took me about 8 total hours to do the quality job that I wanted to have done in there. But I also did it before there was a how-to, and took a bunch of extra time to document everything so I could share this guide I also did it in like 100 degree weather which didn't help my productivity much.
    Jon
    1981 DMC-12 #02100. July 1981. 5-speed, black, grooved w/flap.
    restoration log, April 2012 to present
    restoration log, March 2011 to April 2012
    full and detailed photo restoration log

  8. #18
    10515 dtavres's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jawn101 View Post
    If you're willing to cut and remove everything and retape it, it may be different. I did take my seat out and it took me about 8 total hours to do the quality job that I wanted to have done in there. But I also did it before there was a how-to, and took a bunch of extra time to document everything so I could share this guide I also did it in like 100 degree weather which didn't help my productivity much.
    YIKES!!

    Yeah, it looks like DMC's new block includes labels, which is helpful. If they didn't, I'd use a labeler

    And I want to do a quality job as well, so I'm not in a rush.

    I'll call DMC on Tuesday and see what Danny says. I trust him to say "You can do it" or "Don't do it."
    Dave Tavres | #10515 | Orange, CA | Southern California | www.DMC10515.com |

  9. #19
    Senior Member Bitsyncmaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dtavres View Post
    Thanks all.

    After looking at many other posts online, and reading here, my gut feeling is to just replace the whole block.

    I'm technical (and anal) enough to do it myself, but I'm going to see what DMC charges first.

    It looks like most people who have replaced the block themselves take 3-4 hours, so my hope is that DMC can do it in 2 hours. If it's more than that, I'll do it myself.

    In the event that I do it myself, I see that it's better/easier/fast to just clip the wires as close to the block as possible, and to remove the passenger seat. (Labelling is obvious)

    I don't have the tools or space to remove the passenger seat, so will likely just be a contortionist for a day or two.

    I'm also thinking that I'll just pull 1 wire/fuse at a time, put on the new connectors, and put it in the new block immediately, then move to the next wire/fuse.

    Anything else?
    I just cut one wire off the old block at a time and installed that wire into the new block. I did pull the metal plate out to give me more room. Don't bother pulling the pins from the old block. Remember to untangle each wire as far back into the harness bundle as you can.
    Dave M vin 03572
    http://dm-eng.weebly.com/

  10. #20
    Admn Retired Ron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bitsyncmaster View Post
    I just cut one wire off the old block at a time and installed that wire into the new block. I did pull the metal plate out to give me more room. Don't bother pulling the pins from the old block. Remember to untangle each wire as far back into the harness bundle as you can.
    +1
    Worked for me!

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