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Thread: Carb Conversion "Kits" ETA March-April 2016

  1. #21
    Member
    Join Date:  Jun 2012

    Posts:    45

    IMO the carb conversion is a genius alternative to fuel delivery on a DMC...im sure others have thought about it, and maybe there are possible plans in the works. Here in my town aircraft capitol of the world we have tons of machine shops that could possibly CAD desighn/reverse engineer a peugot mani to make in bulk. While it may increase the price, could be made in bulk kits and sold. But who knows if its worth it for a vehicle in which 8,000 cars exist... maybe the "new" models will be carbed... 

  2. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Feb 2016

    Posts:    943

    Dug out my extra Volvo manifold to take some pictures for another thread. This view clearly shows what a single plane intake plenum looks like under the carb:

    VolvoAPlenum.jpg

    Peugeot 604 looks basically the same under its two venturi bores (as stated earlier, Peugeot manifolds look like dual planes at a glance, but are really single planes underneath the venturi bores. UK Alpine club has a very similar plenum after they route those venturi bores out).

    Compare to the dual plane plenum on the welding jig at the beginning of this thread.

    Bill Robertson
    #5939
    Last edited by content22207_2; 02-24-2016 at 04:45 PM.

  3. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Feb 2016

    Posts:    943

    Dual plane plenums:

    Plenums.jpg

    The reason dual planes have such strong and consistent vacuum signals is because they are 1 3/8" diameter from the throttle plates all the way to the intake ports.

    The reason dual planes struggle to move air at high RPM's is because they are 1 3/8" diameter from the throttle plates all the way to the intake ports.

    Bill Robertson
    #5939

  4. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Feb 2016

    Posts:    943

    Peugeot 604 manifold with the two venturi openings (and a lot more meat) routed out and a 4 barrel adapter welded on:

    Peugeot604RoutedOut.jpg

    You can imagine how turbulent this tremendous size plenum is at low RPM's.

    Bill Robertson
    #5939

  5. #25
    Voice For Hire Farrar's Avatar
    Join Date:  May 2011

    Location:  Long Island, New York

    Posts:    4,282

    My VIN:    02613

    Club(s):   (LINY-DMC) (DCUK)

    Unsolicited testimonial

    Just thought I'd pipe up here and say that as an "early adopter" of this method, I remain a satisfied customer. Bill helped me put a carburetor on my car in 2008, just before the Gettysburg show. Ever since then, fuel delivery has been the least of my car's problems. But for the younger folks out there: do your homework! A carburetor is not magic. You need to know how it works in order to use it correctly. I studied up and knew what I was getting into. This method of fuel delivery allowed me to keep the car on the road while I worked on other problems. (Until the engine destroyed itself, but that's another story.) In my opinion, if you can familiarize yourself with the Motorcraft 2100-series of carburetors before you get one of Bill's kits, you can install this kit in the morning and be driving down the road by afternoon.

    Edit: Just don't do what I did, which was buy the cheapest fuel pump available. That led to a fuel delivery problem! LOL
    Last edited by Farrar; 02-24-2016 at 04:50 PM.
    DeLorean status: test driving new engine

    "Our doubts are traitors,
    And make us lose the good we oft might win
    By fearing to attempt."
    -Wm. Shakespeare, Measure for Measure

  6. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Feb 2016

    Posts:    943

    The worst thing an owner can do if they don't understand carburetors is stick one on their car -- the carb will be a "mystery box" that they may suspect whenever something goes wrong simply because they don't understand it. I had an owner once overheat his car, most likely from air trapped in the radiator, after doing a carb conversion and wondered if the carb might have had something to do with it.

    With varying degrees, nearly carburetors are simple devices unlikely to cause problems. Some carbs are simpler than others. Autolite/Motorcraft 2100 series is incredibly simple, with very few moving parts (there are *SOME* moving parts: I advise new owners to sit down with the carb at their kitchen table and watch it go through its motions before bolting it down to get a complete understanding). One thing that distinguishes the 2100 series is it meters fuel by airflow alone (no metering rods). 2100 series also uses airflow to switch between idle and throttle circuits. And it uses the same jets for both idle and throttle circuits.

    2100 series is also nice because spare parts availability is through the roof. The Chinese are even making surprisingly good replicas to this very day (they are obviously making all the bits from scratch, not laboriously tearing down OEM carbs and refurbishing them). I bought a "commie carb" out of curiosity and was really impressed with its authenticity, but continue to refurb Ford OEM carbs for my conversions.

    That said, there are other carbs is use. Jeff Dickey is running a Rochester 2GC. Lou Costa is running a Holley. As long as it bolts up, sky's pretty much the limit.

    Bill Robertson
    #5939
    Last edited by content22207_2; 02-24-2016 at 06:05 PM.

  7. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Feb 2016

    Posts:    943

    When I tear a carburetor down to rebuild it, I tear it *ALL* the way down:

    CarbTornDown.jpg

    Bill Robertson
    #5939

  8. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Sep 2012

    Location:  Jarretsville, MD

    Posts:    250

    My VIN:    5786, 3196

    Club(s):   (DMA)

    Quote Originally Posted by content22207_2 View Post
    The worst thing an owner can do if they don't understand carburetors is stick one on their car -- the carb will be a "mystery box" that they may suspect whenever something goes wrong simply because they don't understand it. I had an owner once overheat his car, most likely from air trapped in the radiator, after doing a carb conversion and wondered if the carb might have had something to do with it.

    With varying degrees, nearly carburetors are simple devices unlikely to cause problems. Some carbs are simpler than others. Autolite/Motorcraft 2100 series is incredibly simple, with very few moving parts (there are *SOME* moving parts: I advise new owners to sit down with the carb at their kitchen table and watch it go through its motions before bolting it down to get a complete understanding). One thing that distinguishes the 2100 series is it meters fuel by airflow alone (no metering rods). 2100 series also uses airflow to switch between idle and throttle circuits. And it uses the same jets for both idle and throttle circuits.

    2100 series is also nice because spare parts availability is through the roof. The Chinese are even making surprisingly good replicas to this very day (they are obviously making all the bits from scratch, not laboriously tearing down OEM carbs and refurbishing them). I bought a "commie carb" out of curiosity and was really impressed with its authenticity, but continue to refurb Ford OEM carbs for my conversions.

    That said, there are other carbs is use. Jeff Dickey is running a Rochester 2GC. Lou Costa is running a Holley. As long as it bolts up, sky's pretty much the limit.

    Bill Robertson
    #5939
    Will a Holley 2 barrel bolt up? I'm waiting on pricing, but am interested in having some single plane manifolds as spares in case KJet ever goes up on me. I'd prefer to use a Holley carburetor, though, since my other cars run best with them and I've learned how to operate them.

    Bill, I know that we've talked about single vs dual plane manifolds in the past, and I'd definitely want a single plane for my manual. But, for an automatic, would a dual plane be the better choice? I ask because my wife's car is an automatic and she drives less aggressively than I do. Plus, automatics usually don't shift high in the RPM range anyways.
    -Derrin

    5786: DPI cams and cat-less exhaust, galvanized and powder coated manual frame for a proper 5-speed conversion, Kenwood head unit, Polk DXi speakers, and Pioneer-loaded DMC-CA sub box.

    3196 - My wife's DeLorean: DMCH new build, DPI rebuilt engine with performance cams and exhaust, Kenwood head unit, Eclipse speakers, Genesis 5-channel amplifier, and JL loaded DMC sub.

    1956 Oldsmobile Super 88
    1960 Chevrolet Impala
    1961 Corvette
    1972 Buick Skylark GS 455 Clone
    1979 Corvette

  9. #29
    Junior Member
    Join Date:  Feb 2016

    Posts:    4

    Quote Originally Posted by Farrar View Post
    I remain a satisfied customer. Fuel delivery has been the least of my car's problems.
    +1

    The fear of my car not starting is long gone.
    The fear of my car killing me in other ways is alive and well.

  10. #30
    Bad Apple Lou and "Boo"'s Avatar
    Join Date:  Sep 2011

    Posts:    531

    My VIN:    5835

    Club(s):   (LINY-DMC) (DCUK)

    Bill, maybe you can tell us all how reliable your setup is by telling us how many "Teitlebaums" you have put on your care since converting to carberation.

    So how many "Teitlebaums" is it ?
    Lou and "Boo"- The man you love to hate.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "Boo" VIN 5835
    Born October 1981 - Brought back to life December 2011
    "Fastest naturally aspirated PRV" Delorean
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "Blue" - 1985 Fiero GT
    3800sc series 2

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