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Thread: Conversion from an Automatic to Manual

  1. #21
    LS1 DMC Nicholas R's Avatar
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    From an engineering standpoint, I would say that at a minimum consider increasing the outer diameter of your spacers (assuming you're sure about doing this). The clamping area of your bolts is very important, especially on something you're pulling or pushing so much (creating a bending moment). In the standard configuration, the bottom surface of the shifter assembly reacts this load so the bolts dont see any kind of bending or prying. As a result, their load is purely tensile. With your bolts being so long, and your spacers being so thin walled (and being split), you essentially have a prying force being distributed over a very tiny surface area, that is then putting your bolts into bending.

    Something like this would certainly be a step to reducing the loading on your bolts.
    Spacer.jpg

    What class of bolts are you using?

  2. #22
    Senior Member dhaney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas R View Post
    From an engineering standpoint, I would say that at a minimum consider increasing the outer diameter of your spacers (assuming you're sure about doing this). The clamping area of your bolts is very important, especially on something you're pulling or pushing so much (creating a bending moment). In the standard configuration, the bottom surface of the shifter assembly reacts this load so the bolts dont see any kind of bending or prying. As a result, their load is purely tensile. With your bolts being so long, and your spacers being so thin walled (and being split), you essentially have a prying force being distributed over a very tiny surface area, that is then putting your bolts into bending.

    Something like this would certainly be a step to reducing the loading on your bolts.
    Spacer.jpg

    What class of bolts are you using?
    They are grade 8. Just an fyi Marty Meier who helped me with this is an engineer as well. He's also the person who originally came up with this solution.

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  3. #23
    Senior Member dhaney's Avatar
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    You think spacers are better than the rod connectors then?

    That's an interesting thing to ponder.

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  4. #24
    LS1 DMC Nicholas R's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dhaney View Post
    They are grade 8.
    Are you using standard hardware instead of metric?

    Quote Originally Posted by dhaney View Post
    You think spacers are better than the rod connectors then?

    That's an interesting thing to ponder.

    Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk
    Personally I believe it's important to distribute your clamp load over a greater area. Honestly an engineering case could be made either way for whether not to have the spacer be internally threaded.

  5. #25
    Senior Member dhaney's Avatar
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    Metric bolts.

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  6. #26
    LS1 DMC Nicholas R's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dhaney View Post
    Metric bolts.

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    Ok; just curious because grade 8 is only applicable for standard hardware. If you're using class 8.8 metric bolts (stamped on the bolt head), you can always consider class 10.9 or class 12.9 for a little extra strength.

  7. #27
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    Manual shifter mtg brkt versus legs or standoffs.

    Another solution would be to weld four thin steel plates of suitable lenght and height to the collar setup effectively creating a lightweight steel box. It would be simpler and easier than machining large diameter standoffs and prvide much more rigidity to the installation. Though not an engineer by trade I've taught myself to think like one through many years of devising simple yet effective solutions to the small recurrent problems the Delorean's engineering has presented me on a regular basis over time.
    Rob

  8. #28
    Member delgato's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas R View Post
    Are you planning to weld in a new plate or bolt one in? Personally I used 2 pieces of angle iron when I did the auto -> manual conversion (process shown here: http://www.ls1delorean.com/2012/03/t...f-madness.html).
    I asked before about converting my auto frame to manual and someone linked me to your blog. I think the two piece angle idea is brilliant. This is what I ended up doing. I was previously thinking of other solutions and even heard the idea of the raised long stand offs but I just didn't like the thought of that. Thankfully I did get to see your blog and that saved the day simply and efficiently. A very cleaver idea, thank you for sharing.

    My personal concern now is that I cut out the entire auto mounting plate section so it is just one huge hole. Just recently I thought that might not be a good idea since the original plate may have helped keep the structure of the tube part of the frame more ridged.

    Does the original mounting plate in the frame add any support to the overall structure?

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