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Thread: Ready to bleed brakes from dry-any tips?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date:  Mar 2016

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    Ready to bleed brakes from dry-any tips?

    Hi all-so I've got 4 new stainless steel brake lines installed, as well as a new master cylinder. I think I'm ready to re-bleed the entire brake system, and wondered if there's any tips, as this is my first time doing this job.

    I've done some research on bench bleeding the master cylinder, and am not sure if this is relevant, as the diaphram was not removed from the car. thoughts on that?

    And I've got a pressure bleeder I've purchased, so I should be able to do this myself. Would it be ideal to do one line at a time? It looks like folks sometimes leave all 4 valves open initially, then close them off and fine tune each line. Thoughts on that, as well?

    Thanks much for the help!!

  2. #2
    Senior Member Josh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rjd2 View Post
    Hi all-so I've got 4 new stainless steel brake lines installed, as well as a new master cylinder. I think I'm ready to re-bleed the entire brake system, and wondered if there's any tips, as this is my first time doing this job.

    I've done some research on bench bleeding the master cylinder, and am not sure if this is relevant, as the diaphram was not removed from the car. thoughts on that?

    And I've got a pressure bleeder I've purchased, so I should be able to do this myself. Would it be ideal to do one line at a time? It looks like folks sometimes leave all 4 valves open initially, then close them off and fine tune each line. Thoughts on that, as well?

    Thanks much for the help!!
    Since you have a new master cylinder, a bench bleed is necessary.

    Other than that the process is fairly straight forward as you have described. You can go either method with the pressure bleeder, sounds like some guys allow a gravity bleed initially but you always finish when you have bled each caliper individually and see no bubbles coming out of the system.

  3. #3
    Stuck in the 80s John U's Avatar
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    If using a pressure bleeder you do not need to bench bleed the master cylinder.
    Pressurize the system after filling it, push the brake pedal a couple times, then do one nipple at a time (Right rear, left rear, right front, left front).
    Don't let the reservoir run dry or you will have to redo it.
    Be careful with the pressure bleeder. My hose sprung a leak...what a mess! Now when I use it I put the bleeder and as much hose as possible in a garbage bag in case it leaks again.

    John
    Last edited by John U; 05-03-2017 at 06:47 PM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member powerline84's Avatar
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    Also I found it worked best and quicker if you throw some thread tape on each nipple but that's because I was using a vacuum bleeder and it was pulling air in around the threads and not allowing enough vacuum to pull fluid.

  5. #5
    Member
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    thanks! i'll see how it goes!

  6. #6
    Delorean Guru
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    Quote Originally Posted by rjd2 View Post
    thanks! i'll see how it goes!

    Even with a pressure bleeder it is probably a good idea to bench-bleed the Master before trying to do the whole system. My method is to bench-bleed and then, using a "One Man Bleeder" I do the L/F, the R/F then the L/R and finally the R/R, checking and topping off the reservoir between each wheel. I then go around and do it at least once more. You should also flush the clutch (if it is a 5-speed). Since you replaced a bunch of parts you must check for leaks. Someone must hold the pedal down hard while you check each joint for any leakage. After a first drive make sure the fluid level hasn't gone down and test the low level brake light. Be sure the E brake works too.
    David Teitelbaum

  7. #7
    Matt Drive Stainless's Avatar
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    I use this:

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    It works like a dream. It stores a lot of fluid so you really don't need to worry about running out of fluid during the process. Fill it, connect it, pressurize it, and then bleed each caliper and you're done.
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  8. #8
    Young Padawan With The DeLorean kings1527's Avatar
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    Considering the brake master sits level as compared to other cars (where they can sit at a bit of an angle and trap air), I've never bench bled and never had a problem. Always used a pressure bleeder, too. So much easier, faster, and more reliable.

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  9. #9
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    The fact that it sits almost level allows a bubble to sometimes get stuck in the nipple coming out of the plastic reservoir. A pressure bleeder *should* be able to handle that. I don't use a pressure bleeder so that is maybe why I have to bench-bleed the thing.
    David Teitelbaum

  10. #10
    Formally hmm252000
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    When I replaced my hoses, calipers and master cylinder, I went through close to a gallon of brake fluid trying to get the air out. Only after I bench bled the master did the brakes work properly! This was also using a pressure bleeder. Get a bench bleed kit and do it right.

    I also agree with David on testing the system hard once done. After everything is bled, put all your weight on the brake pedal and inspect all the joints and bleeders. I had a connection that wasn't tight enough and started dripping fluid when I pressed down hard (didn't leak during the bleeding process).

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