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Thread: Winter is Coming 2017

  1. #1
    Senior Member Trstno1's Avatar
    Join Date:  Aug 2014

    Location:  Anchorage, Alaska

    Posts:    602

    My VIN:    5625

    Winter is Coming 2017

    Hey guys –

    So I recently came up with a to-do list that I wanted to accomplish this winter. Since I refurbished the front end frame and suspension last winter, I was going to attack the back of the car this year. I plan on doing the following items:

    Rear Suspension:

    1. Tear down old rear suspension and clean-up/por-15/paint rear portion of frame.
    2. Install new rear shocks (Spax as to match the fronts)
    3. Refurbish old springs (sand blast & powder coat)
    4. Refurbish rear spring platforms (sandblast & powder coat)
    5. Refurbish king link pins or replace depending on condition
    6. Replace TAB’s with new hardware
    7. Replace all bushings with poly
    8. Replace rear wheel bearings
    9. Replace any worn out miscellaneous rear suspension hardware


    Drop manual gearbox: (will definitely need tips on this one)

    1. Replace rear main seal (it’s been leaking ever since I purchased the car)
    2. Replace Clutch, pilot bearing, pressure plate, throw-out bearing
    3. Replace flywheel if it needs resurfaced (not sure who really resurfaces these…)
    4. Replace Primary/slave clutch cylinders & install stainless steel cable between them
    5. Replace drivelines with rebuilt ones & new hardware
    6. Potentially split open gearbox to replace roll pins (I’ve had minor issues with shifting into 2nd gear when vehicle is cold)(not sure if I want to attack this one or not……)

    So, I am definitely looking for tips on how to raise the car on blocks and how high in order to get the gear box out, and do’s and don’ts in regard to all the work that I have listed above. Also any opinions on specific vendors for certain parts would be nice.

    Thanks in advance for all the help.
    You can't buy happiness, but you can buy a DeLorean and that's sort of the same thing....

  2. #2
    Guy with a DeLorean Mark D's Avatar
    Join Date:  May 2011

    Location:  Stevens Point,WI

    Posts:    1,877

    My VIN:    6125

    Great list you've got going on there. I've tackled a few of the suspension items on your list and some of the trans work I'll be needing to do on my car in the future.

    My one suggestion would be for the rear suspension to consider new rubber replacement bushings instead of poly. When I was going down that road I read a few different threads where owners who went with poly bushings in the rear didn't like the results. Something to do with the way the bushings are sandwiched between the frame for the lower links. The poly bushings are H shaped and would rub on the frame. The OE rubber bushings have clearance around the contact point in the center of the bushing so the suspension links have a little more clearance to flex. I think the one guy ended up swapping back to rubber at the rear due to the jarring ride. I ended up installing poly bushings everywhere on the front of the car but pressed in new rubber bushings into the rear links.

    As far as procedure goes for some of the suspension work the service manuals cover it pretty well, although it can be a bit tricking trying to get the old bearings in and out of the rear hub carrier. I've got a few photos in various albums in my profile that might be helpful for that.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Jonathan's Avatar
    Join Date:  Jun 2011

    Location:  Ontario, Canada

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    You might also consider rear brake work while you've got all of that apart. Flexible lines on the rear at the very least. I think replacing those if original while having that kind of access would be well timed. Good time for the parking brake assembly to get looked over too, cables included. Drive axles boots might be worth replacing with new depending on their condition. You'll also have good access to the oxygen sensor as well as the fuel filter if either of those are due to be changed.
    One damn minute Admiral...


  4. #4
    Senior Member Trstno1's Avatar
    Join Date:  Aug 2014

    Location:  Anchorage, Alaska

    Posts:    602

    My VIN:    5625

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark D View Post
    Great list you've got going on there. I've tackled a few of the suspension items on your list and some of the trans work I'll be needing to do on my car in the future.

    My one suggestion would be for the rear suspension to consider new rubber replacement bushings instead of poly. When I was going down that road I read a few different threads where owners who went with poly bushings in the rear didn't like the results. Something to do with the way the bushings are sandwiched between the frame for the lower links. The poly bushings are H shaped and would rub on the frame. The OE rubber bushings have clearance around the contact point in the center of the bushing so the suspension links have a little more clearance to flex. I think the one guy ended up swapping back to rubber at the rear due to the jarring ride. I ended up installing poly bushings everywhere on the front of the car but pressed in new rubber bushings into the rear links.

    As far as procedure goes for some of the suspension work the service manuals cover it pretty well, although it can be a bit tricking trying to get the old bearings in and out of the rear hub carrier. I've got a few photos in various albums in my profile that might be helpful for that.

    I will definately take your opinion into consideration as I have read the same thing. So rubber bushings it is. Thanks for the reply!
    You can't buy happiness, but you can buy a DeLorean and that's sort of the same thing....

  5. #5
    Senior Member Trstno1's Avatar
    Join Date:  Aug 2014

    Location:  Anchorage, Alaska

    Posts:    602

    My VIN:    5625

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    You might also consider rear brake work while you've got all of that apart. Flexible lines on the rear at the very least. I think replacing those if original while having that kind of access would be well timed. Good time for the parking brake assembly to get looked over too, cables included. Drive axles boots might be worth replacing with new depending on their condition. You'll also have good access to the oxygen sensor as well as the fuel filter if either of those are due to be changed.
    I actually completely re built the brakes all around 2 years ago. I changed out the calipers, pads, soft lines to stainless steel, brake booster, and all the E-brake hardware. My brakes have been 100% since then. The O2 sensor has been replaced when I installed a spec 1 exhaust 2 years ago. I really appreciate the comments though. Keep them coming!
    You can't buy happiness, but you can buy a DeLorean and that's sort of the same thing....

  6. #6
    Senior Member Trstno1's Avatar
    Join Date:  Aug 2014

    Location:  Anchorage, Alaska

    Posts:    602

    My VIN:    5625

    Does anyone have knowledge on exactly how nigh the car has to be to get the gear box out? I wont have access to a lift so I'll have to put the car up on blocks, and use a ATV lift to get the tranny out. Does anyone have experience with getting the car higher up off the ground than jack stands will get it? I'm looking for a safe way to make that happen.

    I'll keep posting to this thread until repairs are complete.
    You can't buy happiness, but you can buy a DeLorean and that's sort of the same thing....

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date:  Jul 2017

    Location:  Indianapolis, Indiana

    Posts:    27

    My VIN:    04629

    Gearbox removal

    [QUOTE=Trstno1;223871]Does anyone have knowledge on exactly how nigh the car has to be to get the gear box out?

    Trstno1,
    Many years ago I had to replace my 'final drive', it failed (the D's rear end) I had my car on tall Jack Stands, approx. 16" tall from the floor. I had to "tilt" the engine so that I could remove the whole assembly (final drive & trans) together, then split those two assemblies on the ground/bench, replacing the broken part. Installation was reverse of removal.

    The jack height allowed me (on my back) and an additional rolling jack to remove the assembly off the back of the engine. You will make up new cuss words trying to reach around the 'bell housing' to reach and remove the bolts holding everything together.

    A wide surface(on the lifting support) on the rolling jack/lift will help balance this whole assembly while removing and definitely helpful when installing back on the engine.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Trstno1's Avatar
    Join Date:  Aug 2014

    Location:  Anchorage, Alaska

    Posts:    602

    My VIN:    5625

    [QUOTE=ritztoys;223907]
    Quote Originally Posted by Trstno1 View Post
    Does anyone have knowledge on exactly how nigh the car has to be to get the gear box out?

    Trstno1,
    Many years ago I had to replace my 'final drive', it failed (the D's rear end) I had my car on tall Jack Stands, approx. 16" tall from the floor. I had to "tilt" the engine so that I could remove the whole assembly (final drive & trans) together, then split those two assemblies on the ground/bench, replacing the broken part. Installation was reverse of removal.

    The jack height allowed me (on my back) and an additional rolling jack to remove the assembly off the back of the engine. You will make up new cuss words trying to reach around the 'bell housing' to reach and remove the bolts holding everything together.

    A wide surface(on the lifting support) on the rolling jack/lift will help balance this whole assembly while removing and definitely helpful when installing back on the engine.
    So when you say tilt the engine, do you loosen the engine mounts to do so or just shove a shim in between the bottom of the engine and the frame? You don't happen to have any photos of that process do you? I'm trying to source a atv jack in order to bring down the gearbox nice and controlled.
    You can't buy happiness, but you can buy a DeLorean and that's sort of the same thing....

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date:  Jul 2017

    Location:  Indianapolis, Indiana

    Posts:    27

    My VIN:    04629

    [QUOTE=Trstno1;223968]
    Quote Originally Posted by ritztoys View Post

    So when you say tilt the engine, do you loosen the engine mounts to do so or just shove a shim in between the bottom of the engine and the frame? I did loosen those mounts, while removing the rear(transmission mounts) You don't happen to have any photos of that process do you? No sorry, too long ago I'm trying to source a atv jack in order to bring down the gearbox nice and controlled. Be sure the 'jack' you use has plenty of travel also, very helpful
    I replied to your questions in BOLD

    As I mentioned, the lifting platform should be larger than a traditional jack point, helps tremendously. This will be useful when re-assembling to the engine and lining up that whole assembly.

    Maybe a custom wooden platform to support everything?

    I wish you luck in your winter maintenance, my list is growing also! I did this repair to my car and it took about 4-5 weeks. (from breakdown to driving again)

  10. #10
    Senior Member DMC-81's Avatar
    Join Date:  Apr 2014

    Location:  Florida

    Posts:    1,266

    My VIN:    <2000

    Club(s):   (DCF)

    Quote Originally Posted by Trstno1 View Post
    Hey guys –

    So I recently came up with a to-do list that I wanted to accomplish this winter. Since I refurbished the front end frame and suspension last winter, I was going to attack the back of the car this year. I plan on doing the following items:


    Drop manual gearbox: (will definitely need tips on this one)

    1. Replace rear main seal (it’s been leaking ever since I purchased the car)
    2. Replace Clutch, pilot bearing, pressure plate, throw-out bearing
    3. Replace flywheel if it needs resurfaced (not sure who really resurfaces these…)
    4. Replace Primary/slave clutch cylinders & install stainless steel cable between them
    5. Replace drivelines with rebuilt ones & new hardware
    6. Potentially split open gearbox to replace roll pins (I’ve had minor issues with shifting into 2nd gear when vehicle is cold)(not sure if I want to attack this one or not……)

    So, I am definitely looking for tips on how to raise the car on blocks and how high in order to get the gear box out, and do’s and don’ts in regard to all the work that I have listed above. Also any opinions on specific vendors for certain parts would be nice.

    Thanks in advance for all the help.
    Hi there,

    I have had way more experience with the gearbox than I wanted to, so I can help you out some.

    I documented my adventure in this thread. http://dmctalk.org/showthread.php?14...ox-flaw-repair

    It includes Dennis' great advice with photos on removing the box. I removed it once (the second time). It was straight forward but difficult to do by yourself. You'll want to enlist a helper. You don't need to raise the car a ridulous amount... Just enough to clear the clutch / bell housing with the box on the ground. I'll detail my steps later for you. I used a transmission jack from Harbor Freight.. $90.

    The flywheel is rare to buy new and it costs $600. It is recommended to resurface it to have a smooth surface for the new clutch disc. My resurfacing was $80. I suggest to call around to see who can resurface a stepped flywheel while you're waiting for the snow to fly. Any good machine/engine shop should be able to do it.

    I rebuilt my drive axles and that is in the thread. Messy, but straightforward.

    The roll pin replacements are also detailed in the thread.

    Please feel free to PM me with any questions at all.
    Dana

    Delorean status: CECF 2017 Platinum Award winner. Still tinkering...

    Pictures and comments of my restoration journey are in the albums section on my profile.

    .

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