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Thread: Refurbing a Very Early A/C System

  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Jul 2011

    Location:  Ewa Beach, Hawaii

    Posts:    118

    My VIN:    10309

    Now you know it's the compressor. Easy to swap out. If you must change the hoses now's the time. If the hoses look o.k. I would take the chance and put the compressor in and fill it up. R134 is $6 a can at Walmart. You can test the old compressor by taking off the hoses and plugging the suction and discharge holes with your finger. Hold in the clutch and rotate, you can feel the sucking and blowing if it's working.

  2. #12
    Senior Member BABIS's Avatar
    Join Date:  Sep 2012

    Posts:    434

    My VIN:    4502

    Quote Originally Posted by DMC-81 View Post
    Well, I was able to remove the orifice tube today. I used an orifice tool from a rented OEM A/C kit. The tool hooks on the the end of the tube so you can pull it out.

    Here's the tool with a new tube:
    Attachment 53278
    this tool looks ace!
    VIN 4502

  3. #13
    Senior Member DMC-81's Avatar
    Join Date:  Apr 2014

    Location:  Florida

    Posts:    1,266

    My VIN:    <2000

    Club(s):   (DCF)

    Quote Originally Posted by BABIS View Post
    this tool looks ace!
    Indeed! It made the job a breeze. Here is a picture of the separate orifice tool from the one in the whole A/C kit:

    OEM #27003 for GM, or OEM #27004 for GM and Ford

    image.jpg

    Here is a close up of the whole A/C kit, OEM #27150:

    image.jpg
    Last edited by DMC-81; 09-06-2017 at 08:01 PM.
    Dana

    Delorean status: CECF 2017 Platinum Award winner. Still tinkering...

    Pictures and comments of my restoration journey are in the albums section on my profile.

    .

  4. #14
    Senior Member DMC-81's Avatar
    Join Date:  Apr 2014

    Location:  Florida

    Posts:    1,266

    My VIN:    <2000

    Club(s):   (DCF)

    Compressor removal and teardown

    I removed my compressor next and tore it down to assess the condition and if it is still good, replace the shaft seal, etc.

    Compressor disconnected and ready to be removed. First was removing the 3/8" bolt holding the hose bracket, Then, there were 6 M10 nuts and washers (locking and flat) that hold the compressor to the bracket. I removed the 3 back bolts and slid the compressor forward (towards the rear of the car) as I couldn't remove the other 3 because the pulley was in the way:
    image.jpg

    I rented a clutch holding tool, but the hole in the center was too small to fit the 19mm socket. So, I just used my air ratchet just a bit to break it free. That worked no problem:
    image.jpg

    I borrowed the Deluxe A/C clutch hub puller and installer kit posted above from Auto Zone to remove the armature plate:
    image.jpg

    Armature plate removed. You remove this snap ring to remove the pulley hub. The snap ring has a beveled and a flat side. The beveled side goes up:
    image.jpg

    There were 2 shims on the shaft and a woodruff key that I removed:
    image.jpg

    I rented this OEM #27078 jaw puller to remove the pulley assembly:
    image.jpg

    I sprayed a little bit of WD-40 where the the inner race of the bearing meets the shaft hub. Then I positioned the puller and the pulley came off easy after a little bit of initial resistance:
    image.jpg image.jpg

    Next, I removed the snap ring for the coil and the Phillips screw and bracket that holds the wire. Then the coil came off easily. Same thing as before: the snap ring has a beveled and a flat side. The beveled side goes up.
    image.jpg

    To be continued...
    Dana

    Delorean status: CECF 2017 Platinum Award winner. Still tinkering...

    Pictures and comments of my restoration journey are in the albums section on my profile.

    .

  5. #15
    Senior Member DMC-81's Avatar
    Join Date:  Apr 2014

    Location:  Florida

    Posts:    1,266

    My VIN:    <2000

    Club(s):   (DCF)

    Disassembly continued..

    My next step was to remove the 8 M6 bolts and using a rubber mallet I gently tapped the cover loose. There was minimal oil in the compressor, yet it was good to see that there was no damage or debris:
    image.jpg

    Here's a close up of the 5 cylinder walls and the reed valves, both looking pretty good:
    image.jpg

    Here's a close up of the swashplate assembly. The pistons don't exhibit any scoring that I can see:
    image.jpg

    It looks like this compressor is still good. Therefore, I'll clean it well, and put it back together with new seals and a little bit of mineral oil on the moving parts during reassembly. (I will stay with mineral oil in the system.)
    Dana

    Delorean status: CECF 2017 Platinum Award winner. Still tinkering...

    Pictures and comments of my restoration journey are in the albums section on my profile.

    .

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