Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27

Thread: Inertia switch failure, tripping thermal relay of door lock electrical?

  1. #11
    Delorean Guru
    Join Date:  May 2011

    Location:  Northern NJ

    Posts:    6,197

    My VIN:    10757

    Club(s):   (DMA)

    If you are going to use the original door lock module then you should cut a 10 amp in-line fuse into the big red wire. If it blows it will not reset like the breaker and if it blows you know you have a problem. Most likely a stuck relay and usually burnt solenoids too.
    David Teitelbaum

  2. #12
    Member
    Join Date:  Jul 2017

    Location:  Indianapolis, Indiana

    Posts:    49

    My VIN:    04629

    Quote Originally Posted by Bitsyncmaster View Post
    Yes, sounds like a relay is stuck on.
    You hit the answer perfectly! I ventured inside of the door lock controller(outside tie-strap was loose), guess what I found........Stuck relay

    So I got out my trusty 'point file' and cleaned up the contacts, then I re-assembled everything electrical and hooked up the battery..............no sparks and the doors work correctly now and the thermal relay is quiet, no "clicking sound".

    Needless to say I'm one happy m.......r f.......r, problem solved for now. I have a better understanding how this system works now.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Bitsyncmaster's Avatar
    Join Date:  May 2011

    Location:  Leonardtown, MD

    Posts:    6,683

    My VIN:    03572

    Quote Originally Posted by ritztoys View Post
    You hit the answer perfectly! I ventured inside of the door lock controller(outside tie-strap was loose), guess what I found........Stuck relay

    So I got out my trusty 'point file' and cleaned up the contacts, then I re-assembled everything electrical and hooked up the battery..............no sparks and the doors work correctly now and the thermal relay is quiet, no "clicking sound".

    Needless to say I'm one happy m.......r f.......r, problem solved for now. I have a better understanding how this system works now.
    It's the circuit design of the controller that causes those relay to burn the contacts. They use a large capacitor to power the relay coils to provide the one second timing. So the voltage on the relay coil drops slowly hence the contacts open slowly and cause burning because they open slowly.

    The old Zilla controller used the same circuit but used heavy duty relays to lessen the contact burning.
    Dave M vin 03572
    http://dm-eng.weebly.com/

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Sep 2014

    Location:  West Sayville, N.Y.

    Posts:    1,249

    My VIN:    005058 000927

    Club(s):   (AZ-D) (DMA) (DOA) (DCUK)

    Quote Originally Posted by Bitsyncmaster View Post
    It's the circuit design of the controller that causes those relay to burn the contacts. They use a large capacitor to power the relay coils to provide the one second timing. So the voltage on the relay coil drops slowly hence the contacts open slowly and cause burning because they open slowly.

    The old Zilla controller used the same circuit but used heavy duty relays to lessen the contact burning.
    We have Lockzilla's in stock again. We have never encountered contact burning or sticking with the relays they use. They are bulletproof and can be found on our website along with much more reliable solenoids if needed.
    Rob

  5. #15
    Delorean Guru
    Join Date:  May 2011

    Location:  Northern NJ

    Posts:    6,197

    My VIN:    10757

    Club(s):   (DMA)

    The relay contacts in the OEM door lock module are very underrated for the load they have to control. The problem is the relay contacts have to interrupt an inductive load. To do that creates a large arc and if the contacts are not large enough to spread the arc over a bigger area it causes burning of the contact points. Cleaning and redressing them is a very temporary fix. The coating that was on them to help prolong their life is gone and you most certainly have shorted out the solenoids which will cause an even higher current to surge through the relay contacts. The fix now is to rewind or replace the solenoids and upgrade the OEM door lock module (there are how-to's) or replace it. I would get the LockZilla. But keep in mind, even a Lockzilla isn't going to help if the solenoids are burnt and you don't fix or replace them.
    David Teitelbaum

  6. #16
    Member
    Join Date:  Jul 2017

    Location:  Indianapolis, Indiana

    Posts:    49

    My VIN:    04629

    Quote Originally Posted by David T View Post
    The coating that was on them to help prolong their life is gone and you most certainly have shorted out the solenoids which will cause an even higher current to surge through the relay contacts. The fix now is to rewind or replace the solenoids and upgrade the OEM door lock module
    Thanks for the advice, I have a Lockzilla on order now. If my thermal relay was 'tripping', it was kinda of protecting my solenoid. (Right?)
    Since I made a temporary fix to my contact surfaces, the door locks operate properly now. (So my solenoids my be working correctly)

    I'm capable of rewinding, but don't want too if not needed. So..........with the Lockzilla and currently working door solenoids I should be Ok?

  7. #17
    Delorean Guru
    Join Date:  May 2011

    Location:  Northern NJ

    Posts:    6,197

    My VIN:    10757

    Club(s):   (DMA)

    Quote Originally Posted by ritztoys View Post
    Thanks for the advice, I have a Lockzilla on order now. If my thermal relay was 'tripping', it was kinda of protecting my solenoid. (Right?)
    Since I made a temporary fix to my contact surfaces, the door locks operate properly now. (So my solenoids my be working correctly)

    I'm capable of rewinding, but don't want too if not needed. So..........with the Lockzilla and currently working door solenoids I should be Ok?
    If the relay contacts welded themselves together you have to figure you burnt the solenoids (both of them). Even a Lockzilla will not work correctly with burnt solenoids.
    David Teitelbaum

  8. #18
    Member
    Join Date:  Jul 2017

    Location:  Indianapolis, Indiana

    Posts:    49

    My VIN:    04629

    Quote Originally Posted by David T View Post
    If the relay contacts welded themselves together you have to figure you burnt the solenoids (both of them).
    Even though they 'seem' to operate correctly now? Also it was only the passenger door that was affected.

    Can I check the resistance of these coils before removing & rewinding?

    So.......does someone have access to your door solenoids and can measure these values of an nu-burnt solenoid? (Measure this at White connector, after it is separated from wiring harness. Since mine may be 'burnt'?)

  9. #19
    Senior Member Bitsyncmaster's Avatar
    Join Date:  May 2011

    Location:  Leonardtown, MD

    Posts:    6,683

    My VIN:    03572

    Quote Originally Posted by ritztoys View Post
    Even though they 'seem' to operate correctly now? Also it was only the passenger door that was affected.

    Can I check the resistance of these coils before removing & rewinding?

    So.......does someone have access to your door solenoids and can measure these values of an nu-burnt solenoid? (Measure this at White connector, after it is separated from wiring harness. Since mine may be 'burnt'?)
    If your solenoids are still working, you probably did not do much damage to the solenoids.
    Dave M vin 03572
    http://dm-eng.weebly.com/

  10. #20
    Delorean Guru
    Join Date:  May 2011

    Location:  Northern NJ

    Posts:    6,197

    My VIN:    10757

    Club(s):   (DMA)

    You cannot test them properly with an ohmmeter, you would have to use an inductance meter. Guaranteed you burnt them, you will see when you unwind the coils.
    David Teitelbaum

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •