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Thread: Best battery cut off switch?

  1. #11
    Senior Member Bitsyncmaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC-Ron View Post
    Dave,
    I was looking at your thread. Do you have a model number or link for the latching battery switch you used and is the latching mechanism impervious to road vibration?

    Thanks, Ron
    I'm pretty sure this is the relay I have. I think you can find it cheaper.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Intellitec-....c100677.m4598

    You apply coil power one way and it latches on, then apply coil power the other way (swap the 12 volts and ground) and it latches off. So you could control it with a DPDT momentary switch (center off). I made an electronic controller so I could use a simple SPST push button and kill the engine first.

    I've never had a problem with vibration. It's a "solenoid" type so no springs like in a relay that hold the contracts.
    Last edited by Bitsyncmaster; 12-03-2017 at 08:43 AM.
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trstno1 View Post
    I ended up going a bit of a different route with my battery cut off switch. Since I don't smoke and didn't want to constantly be in my battery compartment I replaced the cigg lighter with a latching power switch that controls a heavy current latching relay/isolator that connects the battery to the car. Now all I have to do to connect my battery is press a switch. Very easy and looks good. Also a very easy way to not drain my battery while at car shows with the doors open.
    I like this, A LOT.

    But, since I'm using my cigarette lighter port for a dual USB outlet, I wonder if a second, matching hole could have been drilled out to accommodate the new battery cut off switch that you did?

    Right now, I'm using the inexpensive, green knob style battery cut off in the battery compartment, to cut off power for overnight garage stays. I also have one of the dummy console switches rigged up to interrupt the door-lights circuit, so that I can easily turn off power for a shorter term, like at car shows. Works great!

    Thomas

    ...
    Last edited by citizen; 12-03-2017 at 09:11 AM.
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  3. #13
    Senior Member Trstno1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC-Ron View Post
    Looks like a nice setup. Do you have links or info on the battery cut-off switch and the latching power switch.

    Thanks, Ron

    The switch was:

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    The high current battery isolator solenoid was:

    https://www.amazon.com/Current-Solen.../dp/B076HD7MZ5
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    Last edited by Ron; 12-12-2017 at 08:03 PM. Reason: quote bracket
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  4. #14
    Senior Member DMC-81's Avatar
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    ^ I think Trstno1 wins for best battery cutoff switch. That is really elegant and easy to use!
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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bitsyncmaster View Post
    I'm pretty sure this is the relay I have. I think you can find it cheaper.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Intellitec-....c100677.m4598

    You apply coil power one way and it latches on, then apply coil power the other way (swap the 12 volts and ground) and it latches off. So you could control it with a DPDT momentary switch (center off). I made an electronic controller so I could use a simple SPST push button and kill the engine first.

    I've never had a problem with vibration. It's a "solenoid" type so no springs like in a relay that hold the contracts.
    Dave,
    I like the fact that it is latching. This removes the concern with a power-to-maintain relay where inadvertent interruption of the coil circuit could drop out the battery with the alternator still in operation. There's probably enough inherent capacitance in the car's wiring system so it's not an issue, but you would be depending (hanging) on the voltage regulation of the alternator and the quality of the DC output to avoid damage to electronic components. Then again, maybe we don't have much that's sensitive in a DeLorean.

    Ron

  6. #16
    Mr. Pickles-mobile Shep's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David T View Post
    Spend a little bit more and get the one like Chris got but get it with a removable plastic key. Gives you more security, you can remove the plastic key and no one can make the car work even if they find the battery master switch. For the bracket, make it bigger and stick it under the battery to hold it in place, that way you don't have to bond it to the car permanently. If you don't want to lose the radio presets every time you shut the switch off, wire the power from the fuse in the fuseblock to the hot side of the master switch. Add an in-line fuse to the radio. I have seen where some owners drill a hole and let the plastic key protrude through the cover and the carpet so it is easier to turn the switch on and off and remove the key.
    Not to backtrack too much, but I always found this kind of logic as a sort of "cat and mouse" game with endless security measures before your car is basically one big Fort Knox-approved locking mechanism. Lock your doors, get a tilt-based audible alarm, mount the tilt sensors to the doors themselves. Done deal. Basically, avoid thinking how to stop every last angle and just get into the mindset of a thief.

    If a thief wanted to steal your car quickly, they'd give up as soon as the alarm goes off and would run off (and do -- my neighborhood has seen a rash of car break-ins and you can hear them running for the hills when they blare). But if they were determined, they'd just secure the louvers and tow it away by the back wheels. Then probably replace the louvers later after losing them on the nearest highway on-ramp. Or, even quicker, give the car a jump and drive off before you realized they just drove off without a functional battery. Remember, you technically can drive without a functional battery at all, but seriously don't ever do that, damage can be extensive and usually wreaks havoc on anything electrical ever.

    The point of a battery cutoff switch is to completely disconnect the battery, usually for safety or storage reasons. But while allowing the parasitic drain to remain while cutting off everything else makes it a security measure, several aftermarket alarm offerings already include battery cutoff options -- including Wings-A-Loft -- and this becomes redundant. The removable key guys are for those mounted externally, usually for NHRA dragged vehicles like hotrods and such where physical security is not all that great to begin with (roadsters don't have roofs and I've seen many of these that drag). The physical construction of these hotrods are simple in nature and would be VERY easy to steal and make serious cash on quickly given their lack of VIN's also. The ones that can't be removed are usually meant for the cars that simply aren't street legal anymore and are trailered to events, so there's no need to go all out and secure that guy, or for guys that don't really have a need for the extra security measure.

    (Last bit explained to me by the more knowledgeable guys at Summit Racing when I used to work there by the way, they really know their stuff).

    EDIT:
    Also, gotta ask: why light up the battery cutoff switch? Glare on the dashboard alone would drive me nuts, especially at night. Heck if I'm not sure if I got power at a car show, I look at my doors. Lights on? Got power. No lights? Power's off. If it was an RGB kind of guy that could hold for like 5 seconds red or green based on "off" or "on" respectively, that would make sense, but I don't know. You guys are mounting your switches in areas where one errant press can disconnect it. I'd be much more at ease with it mounted where most OBD-II ports are mounted nowadays, out of sight but well within reach!
    Last edited by Shep; 12-11-2017 at 01:13 AM.
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  7. #17
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    I like the simple, mechanical switch with the removable key. I use it not so much for security as much as shutting the whole car off when I am at a show or when I park the car in the garage to eliminate parasitic drain. The removable key gives me the option to use it as a security device if I need it but any determined thief will just bypass it easily. That is once he can find it! As for the determined thief, they aren't going to mess around and will just tow the car away as quickly as possible as you said. That's why we have insurance. I suppose you could also get LoJack if you are that paranoid about losing the car. An alarm isn't going to stop a determined car thief but the LoJack will help you recover it. As for a remote, latching master relay, that is just complicated and unnecessary. And the consequences of actuating it when the car is running must be considered especially if you can do it inadvertently. I guess you can add a circuit so you can't actuate it if the motor is running but that just adds to the complexity! And we all know what happens when you increase complexity, you increase the possibilities of failure.
    David Teitelbaum

  8. #18
    Mr. Pickles-mobile Shep's Avatar
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    Security as a bonus is never a bad thing! KISS is great, agree 100% with you there. Latching relays might be useful for the less physically capable (I have multiple owners in mind there where bending is a serious problem), but without that, get a proper one.

    That said, I'd be afraid I'd lose the key myself!
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  9. #19
    Senior Member Bitsyncmaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shep View Post
    Security as a bonus is never a bad thing! KISS is great, agree 100% with you there. Latching relays might be useful for the less physically capable (I have multiple owners in mind there where bending is a serious problem), but without that, get a proper one.

    That said, I'd be afraid I'd lose the key myself!
    Wait till you see mine in operation. My push button switch sits in the indent that was used for the dash rheostat. Even then you have to hold it down for one second to shut down the engine and power. Mine even shuts the engine down before shutting down the battery.
    Dave M vin 03572
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  10. #20
    Mr. Pickles-mobile Shep's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bitsyncmaster View Post
    Wait till you see mine in operation. My push button switch sits in the indent that was used for the dash rheostat. Even then you have to hold it down for one second to shut down the engine and power. Mine even shuts the engine down before shutting down the battery.
    While you're driving?! Cargo in front of the shifter is my big concern, my Mom's purse once set off my Awooga horn (did it for kicks, nobody got the reference and it's been removed as a result) for a solid 10 seconds while sat it on button mounted exactly there. Frantic for sure, but killing the engine would be even worse in my book as you lose the power brakes.

    Discreet switching for something that important is key, it's the passengers that I don't trust on that.
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