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Thread: Fuel lines

  1. #1
    Member
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    Fuel lines

    After seeing another Delorean fire make its rounds on facebook, it scared the hell out of me. I do have a fire extinguisher, but there is also talk that the original fuel lines should be replaced to prevent this from happening.

    I check the Delorean Texas inventory and see they offer part #102359. Is this the only fuel line generally spoken of or are there more? What else should be replaced if need be?

  2. #2
    EFI'd dn010's Avatar
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    You'd look for a set of lines that come off of the fuel distributor like here: http://www.deloreanindustries.com/br...tion-line-set/

    With that, if the lines are original coming off the "hard lines" to the fuel pump, I'd suggest to replace those too and the rubber line for the accumulator. The original lines going to the pump from the steel line are plastic and aged. Along with a set of lines you'll need a set of new copper washers unless it is included, which DPI does include per their description.
    Last edited by dn010; 01-08-2018 at 06:18 PM.
    -----Dan B.

  3. #3
    President, DeLorean Industries
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    We offer a complete solution for all 13 engine compartment lines. Crush washers included. Let us know if you have any other questions on our product offerings.

  4. #4
    Senior Member DMC-81's Avatar
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    Here are a couple tips:

    When you replace them, try to clean the sealing surfaces on both sides of the crush washers well. Then follow the torque specifications for the hollow fuel bolts as stated in the Workshop Manual to avoid breaking them.

    When finished, I pressurized the fuel lines before starting the engine to check for any leaks/weeping. Then again right after starting the engine.

    Good luck.
    Dana

    1981 DeLorean DMC-12 (5 Speed, Gas Flap, Black Interior, Windshield Antenna, Dark Gray)
    Restored as "mostly correct, but with flaws corrected". Pictures and comments of my restoration are in the albums section on my profile.
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  5. #5
    President, DeLorean Industries
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    No cleaning or prep work is required on our line ends. If you try to clean the mating surface you will risk damaging the plating. You should check for excessive build up of corrosion on the fuel distributor case iron mating surfaces and injectors though.

  6. #6
    Senior Member DMC-81's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delorean Industries View Post
    No cleaning or prep work is required on our line ends. If you try to clean the mating surface you will risk damaging the plating. You should check for excessive build up of corrosion on the fuel distributor case iron mating surfaces and injectors though.
    Thanks for the clarification Josh. Yes, the fittings on new lines shouldn't need cleaning, and you wouldn't want to use anything that causes damage to any surface, plated or otherwise. I was referring to anything that was reused, fuel bolts, injectors, fuel distributor, CSV, CPR, etc. You would want to remove old crusty fuel, dirt, corrosion etc.. Also this tip is in general, regardless of which vendor you choose.

    ------------------

    In my case, I had all hollow bolts re-plated, new injectors and fuel filter, and I repainted the fuel distributor. However, I got a little bit of paint on the sealing surface of one of the top fittings on the FD. This caused a slight weep when I pressurized the fuel lines the first time. After correcting that, my system was tight and I was good to start the engine.

    Basically, cleanliness and caution are warranted with this job.
    Last edited by DMC-81; 01-09-2018 at 01:02 PM.
    Dana

    1981 DeLorean DMC-12 (5 Speed, Gas Flap, Black Interior, Windshield Antenna, Dark Gray)
    Restored as "mostly correct, but with flaws corrected". Pictures and comments of my restoration are in the albums section on my profile.
    2006 Dodge Magnum R/T (D/D)
    2010 Camaro SS (Transformers Edition)

  7. #7
    Delorean Guru
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    Yes, any tiny piece of dirt can prevent proper sealing. Another common problem is, during assembly, you lose a washer (usually the lower one) and don't realize it. The fitting will leak and the first temptation is to try tightening it more. You break the bolt and then realize the washer is missing. The other common cause of leaks is trying to reuse the copper sealing washers. When they are used they get "Work Hardened". When you try to reuse them they are harder and do not "crush" like new ones which are softer. You try to tighten it more to stop the leak and break the bolt. The hollow bolts cannot take much torque. Always use new washers, make sure they are all in place before tightening and keep the joints scrupulously clean when assembling.
    David Teitelbaum

  8. #8
    Not a DeLorean Guru
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    Be sure to have an accurate/correctly calibrated torque wrench when tightening down the banjo bolts. The torque values are low, and it is very easy to break the bolts.
    -Mike
    1981 DeLorean, Carb LS4 swap completed
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  9. #9
    Senior Member DavidProehl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by opethmike View Post
    The torque values are low, and it is very easy to break the bolts.
    Yes they are! I broke 1 of mine even when aware they were easy to break.

    It sounds like the OP is already planning to replace lines, but in case anyone needs more fear struck into them: I had an original line burst on me while driving about 5 years ago, which thankfully killed the engine, preventing a fire from starting. The engine was still cold which helped as well. Needless to say, I replaced every fuel line that week!
    David Proehl

  10. #10
    Stupid Newbie DaraSue's Avatar
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    When I had mine apart doing some VOD work recently, I had to tighten a couple of them past spec to get a good seal (that was with washers from O'Reilly, though). The big 17 & 19MM ones don't break as easily but you might want to order a few spares of the small ones just in case. Also be careful when testing after reinstalling, mine didn't appear to be leaking during initial idle check but then the 17MM was dripping after I took it on a short test drive. If you can, have a helper start the car while you watch the engine, fire extinguisher at the ready.
    Last edited by DaraSue; 01-09-2018 at 02:20 PM.

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