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Thread: Cannot separate hard line from accumulator

  1. #11
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    I squeezed some 0.5" conduit to make a snugly-fitting extension to my 3/8" ratchet:
    20180714_145242.jpg
    I was then able to use that with the 19mm flared crowsfoot to loosen the flexible line fitting, while holding down the accumulator with a 17mm wrench, with a temporary pipe extension. The helpful thing here is that the flared crowsfoot, and the snug extension, can hang by themselves from the fitting, while you get ready with the other wrench. After removing that fitting, I was able to remove the hard-line fitting using a 17mm 'normal' crowsfoot (with the extension ratchet), while holding the accumulator with a 14mm wrench, with the temporary extension.

    However, I'm still stuck with the ferrule that won't come loose from the fitting:
    20180714_154445.jpg

    Although I can attach the fitting to the new accumulator, I'm a little concerned that unless I unstick the ferrule to allow it to reseat into the fitting and line, that I will have leaks. Any thoughts?

    Robert
    Last edited by DMC1890; 07-14-2018 at 06:09 PM.
    Robert
    1981 DeLorean #1890
    1976 Datsun 280Z
    1968 Pontiac Le Mans convertible

  2. #12
    Senior Member DMC5180's Avatar
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    Donít worry about the ferrule fitting. That joint will remain leak free. Just retighten the line B-nut after you have it all back in place.


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  3. #13
    Delorean Guru
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    You do have to really crank on that fitting because it is steel, not brass to get it to be leaktight when you re-assemble. When tightening that fitting you are deforming that ferrule to make the joint leaktight.
    David Teitelbaum

  4. #14
    Senior Member DMC-81's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC5180 View Post
    Donít worry about the ferrule fitting. That joint will remain leak free. Just retighten the line B-nut after you have it all back in place.


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    +1. When you get it all back together, tightened, and fuel primed in the system, you will want to check that fitting and all the others for leaks, weeping, etc. while the car is still elevated.

    A lift is awesome to have, but I did all my underside work (including gearbox R&R) with jack stands.

    Glad you got it off. The accumulator is up there on the list of worst jobs because of limited access. The homemade ratchet extension and crows feet were the ticket for me.
    Dana

    1981 DeLorean DMC-12 (5 Speed, Gas Flap, Black Interior, Windshield Antenna, Dark Gray)
    Restored as "mostly correct, but with flaws corrected". Pictures and comments of my restoration are in the albums section on my profile.
    2006 Dodge Magnum R/T (D/D)
    2010 Camaro SS (Transformers Edition)

  5. #15
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    I did spend literally hours trying to pull the fitting/ferrule from the hard line, so that now the ferrule spins freely (along with the fitting), on the hard line. That's why I'm concerned about getting a tight connection again. I will certainly pressure the system up while I have it jacked up so that I can check thoroughly for leaks. I'll see what happens.

    Thanks,
    Robert
    Robert
    1981 DeLorean #1890
    1976 Datsun 280Z
    1968 Pontiac Le Mans convertible

  6. #16
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    Final follow up - in my case, the fatal mistake was attempting to remove the hard line from the 90-deg fitting. As DMC-81 said, you should remove the fitting from the accumulator, while leaving the hard line-to-fitting connection intact. Because I didn't have the proper tools, I thought that removing the hard line first would simplify matters. But, the continued attempts to separate the fitting from the hard line galled the hard line such that the ferrule would no longer seal sufficiently, resulting in a slow drip.

    I ended up by cutting the hard line at the ferrule. I then got Hervey's barbed fitting for the accumulator output, and used a bit of high-pressure hose to connect from the accumulator to the remaining hard line. No leaks.
    Robert
    1981 DeLorean #1890
    1976 Datsun 280Z
    1968 Pontiac Le Mans convertible

  7. #17
    Delorean Guru
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    The way I do it, the way I think it should be done), is to undo the hard line and then the clamp holding the accumulator. Once you undo those things the accumulator will drop out of the chassis and you can do the rest of the lines easily. Reassemble in the reverse order. That one hard line can be difficult between the difficulty getting wrenches on the fitting to getting the accumulator loose from the ferrule. Again, to get that hard line leaktight you really have to crank on that fitting and get it TIGHT without deforming the hard line. Takes a lot of patience and some colorful language. Especially with fuel dripping down your arm. A lift is nice but it can be done with jackstands and a creeper (or cardboard) or just laying on the floor if that's all you got. The main thing is to make sure you have NO leaks! BTW some vendors will offer an accumulator that is smaller than the original. Try to get the one that is the same size as the original if you can. It will hold the rest pressure up for the specified amount of time. The smaller one can't.
    David Teitelbaum

  8. #18
    Senior Member DMC-81's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC1890 View Post
    Final follow up - in my case, the fatal mistake was attempting to remove the hard line from the 90-deg fitting. As DMC-81 said, you should remove the fitting from the accumulator, while leaving the hard line-to-fitting connection intact. Because I didn't have the proper tools, I thought that removing the hard line first would simplify matters. But, the continued attempts to separate the fitting from the hard line galled the hard line such that the ferrule would no longer seal sufficiently, resulting in a slow drip.

    I ended up by cutting the hard line at the ferrule. I then got Hervey's barbed fitting for the accumulator output, and used a bit of high-pressure hose to connect from the accumulator to the remaining hard line. No leaks.
    Glad that you got it resolved, and that you found a solution for the damaged hard line without having to replace the whole thing.

    Quote Originally Posted by David T View Post
    The way I do it, the way I think it should be done), is to undo the hard line and then the clamp holding the accumulator. Once you undo those things the accumulator will drop out of the chassis and you can do the rest of the lines easily. Reassemble in the reverse order. That one hard line can be difficult between the difficulty getting wrenches on the fitting to getting the accumulator loose from the ferrule. Again, to get that hard line leaktight you really have to crank on that fitting and get it TIGHT without deforming the hard line. Takes a lot of patience and some colorful language. Especially with fuel dripping down your arm. A lift is nice but it can be done with jackstands and a creeper (or cardboard) or just laying on the floor if that's all you got. The main thing is to make sure you have NO leaks! BTW some vendors will offer an accumulator that is smaller than the original. Try to get the one that is the same size as the original if you can. It will hold the rest pressure up for the specified amount of time. The smaller one can't.
    Yes, David, you said that before, but the OP stated that didn't work for him. I'm sure everyone has their preferred/familiar way, but I had success with the other method and I didn't have to risk damaging the hard line fitting. In my plumbing experience, those hard line fittings (compression nut with ferrule on a tube) are very difficult to remove and reattach without having them leak, because the line/tube is relatively soft and deforms slightly to make the seal against the ferrule. The second time it has to deform even more. That's why you have to crank on it even tighter the next time. Eventually it won't seal. We have the same problem with the bottom fuel filter fitting. Why risk it on the accumulator if there's another, sturdier fitting to work with?
    Dana

    1981 DeLorean DMC-12 (5 Speed, Gas Flap, Black Interior, Windshield Antenna, Dark Gray)
    Restored as "mostly correct, but with flaws corrected". Pictures and comments of my restoration are in the albums section on my profile.
    2006 Dodge Magnum R/T (D/D)
    2010 Camaro SS (Transformers Edition)

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