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Thread: DIY fuel injection lines

  1. #11
    Senior Member DMC-81's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by r00b View Post
    Thanks for the info, I was planning on having rubber or vinyl tubing over the nylon line to protect it from abrasion but it might also be needed to protected it from making contact with the hot intake manifold. I hypothesize that the fuel will keep the nylon and fittings at a cooler temperature than the rest of the engine bay.

    Anyone happen to know the fuel temperature at the injectors?
    The engine temperatures in that area are hot enough to burn your hand.

    I feel obliged to chime in on feelings/opinions.... these are not parts to experiment with and hypothesize about. The pressures are high, and the temperatures are hot as mentioned. There are 2 fittings per hose to worry about securing properly. I think the chance of failure is high. So, in those aspects, it is dangerous.

    I would perhaps call my insurance company and ask them if they will cover these DIY parts against engine fire.

    I am a pretty handy guy, but I would not even think about making them myself, knowing that there are quality offerings from several vendors at a reasonable price point.
    Last edited by DMC-81; 05-13-2019 at 08:14 PM.
    Dana

    1981 DeLorean DMC-12 (5 Speed, Gas Flap, Black Interior, Windshield Antenna, Dark Gray)
    Restored as "mostly correct, but with flaws corrected". Pictures and comments of my restoration are in the albums section on my profile.
    2006 Dodge Magnum R/T (D/D)
    2010 Camaro SS (Transformers Edition)

  2. #12
    EFI'd dn010's Avatar
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    +1! Well stated.
    -----Dan B.

  3. #13
    Administrator Ron's Avatar
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    +2

    ...and the insurance company will say, "No"

  4. #14
    Senior Member r00b's Avatar
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    The OEM lines are rubber over polyamide (AKA nylon) core, that's in my car now! There's already a kit for k-jet lines for a ferrari, it's $70!
    It would have been nice to learn what the vendors know, but I imagine there's a conflict of interest . Maybe they should get into selling fuel lines to owners of other k-jet cars as well; ferraris, porsches, bmws, volvos.


    K-jetronic Products start on page 23
    http://www.unobtainiumsupply.com/Uno...oduct_List.PDF

    Instructions
    http://www.unobtaniumsupply.com/Down...structions.pdf

    This thread has some good information
    http://dmctalk.org/showthread.php?84...el-distributor

    A thread about the kit
    https://www.ferrarichat.com/forum/th...on-kit.186689/

    If you only want the vendor lines, that's fine. I hope they don't destroy your fuel system 10 years down the road.

    Does anyone sell OEM style lines?
    Last edited by r00b; 05-14-2019 at 02:01 AM.

  5. #15
    Senior Member DMC-81's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by r00b View Post
    The OEM lines are rubber over polyamide (AKA nylon) core, that's in my car now! There's already a kit for k-jet lines for a ferrari, it's $70!
    It would have been nice to learn what the vendors know, but I imagine there's a conflict of interest . Maybe they should get into selling fuel lines to owners of other k-jet cars as well; ferraris, porsches, bmws, volvos.


    K-jetronic Products start on page 23
    http://www.unobtainiumsupply.com/Uno...oduct_List.PDF

    Instructions
    http://www.unobtaniumsupply.com/Down...structions.pdf

    This thread has some good information
    http://dmctalk.org/showthread.php?84...el-distributor

    A thread about the kit
    https://www.ferrarichat.com/forum/th...on-kit.186689/

    If you only want the vendor lines, that's fine. I hope they don't destroy your fuel system 10 years down the road.

    Does anyone sell OEM style lines?

    Hey, thanks for your concern. After buying, inspecting, and installing all 13 lines from 2 different vendors, I think I'm comfortable that their quality will last at least 10 years. What features/construction details about them make you wonder about their longevity?

    Luckily we don't have to buy these from an unobtainium website. I'm still amazed that we have multiple vendors worldwide that offer parts for a 38 year old orphan car of limited production. So, I'm happy to support them.
    Last edited by DMC-81; 05-14-2019 at 01:18 PM.
    Dana

    1981 DeLorean DMC-12 (5 Speed, Gas Flap, Black Interior, Windshield Antenna, Dark Gray)
    Restored as "mostly correct, but with flaws corrected". Pictures and comments of my restoration are in the albums section on my profile.
    2006 Dodge Magnum R/T (D/D)
    2010 Camaro SS (Transformers Edition)

  6. #16
    Senior Member Parzival's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by r00b View Post
    The OEM lines are rubber over polyamide (AKA nylon) core, that's in my car now! There's already a kit for k-jet lines for a ferrari, it's $70!
    It would have been nice to learn what the vendors know, but I imagine there's a conflict of interest . Maybe they should get into selling fuel lines to owners of other k-jet cars as well; ferraris, porsches, bmws, volvos.


    K-jetronic Products start on page 23
    http://www.unobtainiumsupply.com/Uno...oduct_List.PDF

    Instructions
    http://www.unobtaniumsupply.com/Down...structions.pdf

    This thread has some good information
    http://dmctalk.org/showthread.php?84...el-distributor

    A thread about the kit
    https://www.ferrarichat.com/forum/th...on-kit.186689/

    If you only want the vendor lines, that's fine. I hope they don't destroy your fuel system 10 years down the road.

    Does anyone sell OEM style lines?
    Looks like with the link you provided. That you would need two kits to do all the lines. Thats almost 200 bucks right there. Then you have to make all the connections 2 per line, totaling in at 26 connections, and then hope that none leak.

    possible?.. Yes.

    Will it really save you any money?.. Not enough that it makes any since, if any at all.

    I'm not gonna say not to try it. I just don't see the reason. The lines just don't cost that much money.

  7. #17
    Delorean Guru
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    If you try to do it yourself (DIY) you will not be buying in any quantity that will get you any savings compared to a vendor that WILL buy in quantity to get the price break. Not having experience installing the fittings you will damage some of your stock before you get it right. Then there is the question of if you really did do it right or will a hose pop off? Like brake lines, do you really need to save money that bad? If you feel that the lines must be replaced it makes no sense to DIY it and put lines on that may be even less safe than what you already have on.
    David Teitelbaum

  8. #18
    EFI'd dn010's Avatar
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    Don't forget the cost of the tooling to crimp the fittings on unless you're going to buy barbed banjo fittings. I don't know - maybe it's just me, but I'm sure there is a good reason no one has ever tried doing this before.
    -----Dan B.

  9. #19
    Senior Member r00b's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC-81 View Post
    Hey, thanks for your concern. After buying, inspecting, and installing all 13 lines from 2 different vendors, I think I'm comfortable that their quality will last at least 10 years. What features/construction details about them make you wonder about their longevity?
    I read about some orange lines that were often used for the tank lines. It turned out their life was 10 years and the lines would deteriorate internally blocking the fuel filter. When used after the filter they would destroy the fuel distributor. Though stock fuel lines do age well, they are long past their designed life and need to be replaced. Whatever the case, in the short term, they are better than the 38 year old lines in some cars. If the material is better than nylon I want to know about it.

    Quote Originally Posted by DMC-81 View Post
    I'm still amazed that we have multiple vendors worldwide that offer parts for a 38 year old orphan car of limited production. So, I'm happy to support them.
    I'm also happy to support the vendors when they make new parts unique to the car, not so much so when it's the exact part I cat get at autozone or on amazon for 1/3 the price. It is nice that they do offer those parts, if you don't want to figure it out yourself.

    Quote Originally Posted by Parzival View Post
    Looks like with the link you provided. That you would need two kits to do all the lines. Thats almost 200 bucks right there. Then you have to make all the connections 2 per line, totaling in at 26 connections, and then hope that none leak.
    I think the most important part is knowing that it will work and what sizes to get. If you install the nylon correctly onto the barb it won't leak.

    Quote Originally Posted by David T View Post
    If you feel that the lines must be replaced it makes no sense to DIY it and put lines on that may be even less safe than what you already have on.
    There isn't some complex process to installing nylon tubing onto barb fittings. That's what the car came with, why would it be less safe. Certainly not less safe then 38 year old lines.

    I was hoping to get more input from people who know far more than me on the subject, facts on why it would or would not be a good idea. In the past this would have happened, maybe times have changed. I don't care about the opinions of naysayers who say you can't because they can't and tell you not to even try. I'll see if I can get my hands on the correct sized tubing, if not I'll just get the lines from the vendors. If no one is interested in alternatives I'll keep my future projects off the forum.

    Quote Originally Posted by dn010 View Post
    Don't forget the cost of the tooling to crimp the fittings on unless you're going to buy barbed banjo fittings. I don't know - maybe it's just me, but I'm sure there is a good reason no one has ever tried doing this before.
    I found in my research that people use a tool for making flare fittings to hold the nylon so you don't have to buy the expensive tool. I believe all the stock fittings are barbed banjo since the car came with nylon from the factory and I have the factory lines, I'm not sure about the return line, it looks like some white plastic or nylon is in there where the hose joins. Turns out people have done it before for their k-jet ferraris.

    Really I want to know what the new lines are made of so I can go down that rabbit hole of research.

  10. #20
    Senior Member DMC-81's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by r00b View Post
    I read about some orange lines that were often used for the tank lines. It turned out their life was 10 years and the lines would deteriorate internally blocking the fuel filter. When used after the filter they would destroy the fuel distributor. Though stock fuel lines do age well, they are long past their designed life and need to be replaced. Whatever the case, in the short term, they are better than the 38 year old lines in some cars. If the material is better than nylon I want to know about it.


    I'm also happy to support the vendors when they make new parts unique to the car, not so much so when it's the exact part I cat get at autozone or on amazon for 1/3 the price. It is nice that they do offer those parts, if you don't want to figure it out yourself.


    I was hoping to get more input from people who know far more than me on the subject, facts on why it would or would not be a good idea. In the past this would have happened, maybe times have changed. I don't care about the opinions of naysayers who say you can't because they can't and tell you not to even try. I'll see if I can get my hands on the correct sized tubing, if not I'll just get the lines from the vendors. If no one is interested in alternatives I'll keep my future projects off the forum.


    Really I want to know what the new lines are made of so I can go down that rabbit hole of research.
    I know that under the outermost black PVC coating, and under the next stainless steel braided layer, they appear to have a whitish nylon type hose. No orange hose, but I don't know exactly the type of material. I like that they have 3 layers. The lines that I got from DeLoreanGo are described as "Very high quality item made in the UK. Manufacturer's lifetime warranty. DOT, ADR and TÜV certified." Perhaps you can research what fuel line material(s) meet those 3 government standards? My lines from DMCH are very similar looking.

    Also, from a mechanical empathy perspective, I have chosen to use non-ethanol fuel in the DeLorean, and I applied thermal shielding on lines near very hot surfaces....just for added peace of mind.

    I am all for figuring it out myself as this example thread from my restoration shows, but I don't think it's worth the risk on these parts:

    http://dmctalk.org/showthread.php?15...rly-A-C-System

    My opinion is you are overthinking it. We laid out several reasons to not DIY, but at the end of the day, it is your car.
    Dana

    1981 DeLorean DMC-12 (5 Speed, Gas Flap, Black Interior, Windshield Antenna, Dark Gray)
    Restored as "mostly correct, but with flaws corrected". Pictures and comments of my restoration are in the albums section on my profile.
    2006 Dodge Magnum R/T (D/D)
    2010 Camaro SS (Transformers Edition)

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