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Thread: timing chain tension release with cover still installed.

  1. #11
    Senior Member Giamanut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron View Post
    Are you re-setting the tensioner(s) the same way?
    R.E. "Set both timing chain tensioners by turning the ratchet mechanism clockwise with a screw driver.", WSM C:07:11
    No the screw they reference just turn enough to release the lock on the tensioner teeth they are just spring loaded as soon as you let go of it , it just pops back and lock on a tooth. the release screw does not turn all the way around.

  2. #12
    Administrator Ron's Avatar
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    Bad Idea, IMHO

    Quote Originally Posted by Giamanut View Post
    No the screw they reference just turn enough to release the lock on the tensioner teeth they are just spring loaded as soon as you let go of it , it just pops back and lock on a tooth. the release screw does not turn all the way around.
    No, it's a ratchet mechanism...
    Anyway, the tension needs to be set using the Work Shop manual's method (above, including "Do not assist the tensioner to find their operational setting") or the one in the Volvo Service Manual, Pg.56:

    SetTension.jpg

    Otherwise, you are making a fairly high risk gamble, imho.

    =========

    For prosperity:
    CheckWear.jpg

  3. #13
    Senior Member Giamanut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron View Post
    No, it's a ratchet mechanism...
    Anyway, the tension needs to be set using the Work Shop manual's method (above, including "Do not assist the tensioner to find their operational setting") or the one in the Volvo Service Manual, Pg.56:

    SetTension.jpg

    Otherwise, you are making a fairly high risk gamble, imho.

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    For prosperity:
    CheckWear.jpg
    Exactly "do not assist" Yes it is a ratcheting type of assemble you don't but it adjust automatically a spring pushes it out notch by notch when you reach 4 notches your chains are worn out the screw is simply a release for the notches that allows you to push the shaft back in the pocket against the spring and as soon as you release it it comes back out the proper amount of notches that is exact why it states "DO NOT Assist " meaning don't push it against the chain to try and make your chain tighter.
    They self adjust and the screw only turn 1/4 turn. Absolutely no rick of getting the tension wrong but you do have to make sure the chain in on the guides properly. Do Not Assist Literally mean self adjusting in this case!

  4. #14
    Administrator Ron's Avatar
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  5. #15
    Senior Member Giamanut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron View Post
    Yep the locking piece is spring loaded. The tensioner is also spring loaded.
    The only way you can mess up the tensioner is by forcing it against the chain. IE Assisting it! Per the manual "DO NOT ASSIST". What adjustment are you referring to? Other than Do Not Assist? There is no real adjustment all you can do is release the lock and push the tensioner away from the chain, and as soon as you let go it is going right back against the chain and lock on whatever notch the slack in you chain allows. There is no adjusting that, per the manual.

  6. #16
    Administrator Ron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giamanut View Post
    Yep the locking piece is spring loaded.
    Yes, and that spring has it held in a "set or release" position (as called out above)!

    Quote Originally Posted by Giamanut View Post
    The tensioner is also spring loaded.
    Yes, while the engine is off. And more so when the oil pressure pushes the piston...

    Quote Originally Posted by Giamanut View Post
    The only way you can mess up the tensioner is by forcing it against the chain. IE Assisting it! Per the manual "DO NOT ASSIST". What adjustment are you referring to? Other than Do Not Assist?
    ...
    (Actually, removing the lock would mean replacing the tensioner, per the manual. Another subject ;-)

    During re/assembly, when you "make sure the chain in on the guides properly" etc., you are 'assisting the tensioner' by reducing the up to 8mm play it's allowed to a minimum, which is ok. Applying pressure afterwards is not. Then they say to turn the tensioner's screw clockwise, moving it from the "release" position, which the ball and little spring are holding it in (per manual above), to the "lock" position, where the little spring and ball will then hold it (per manual above). It seems to me that you are skipping this step -- Nowhere do you adjust/set/turn the screw clockwise as called out in all of the manuals...

    The way I read them all is, they basically want you to eliminate the play (w/o applying pressure) during re/assembly THEN ensure the tensioner screw is in its lock position/mode. An initial setting. Afterwards, the oil pressure will supply tension to the chain and the tensioner will advance (ratchet), taking up additional play. The piston is allowed up to ~8mm of play, but they want it all out whenever the engine is off.

    I do see that you might be able to use a pick to turn the screw just enough to release it a step but not enough to put it in the release position/mode, if you were very careful. And that it would probably take the slack back up the first time you ran the engine. But working blind with an unconfirmed <8mm = ~1/3" of slop and unconfirmed finger position would be beyond my comfort range, especially knowing that ignores several manuals saying to remove the cover and turn the screw clockwise.


  7. #17
    Senior Member Giamanut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron View Post
    Yes, and that spring has it held in a "set or release" position (as called out above)!

    Yes, while the engine is off. And more so when the oil pressure pushes the piston...


    (Actually, removing the lock would mean replacing the tensioner, per the manual. Another subject ;-)

    During re/assembly, when you "make sure the chain in on the guides properly" etc., you are 'assisting the tensioner' by reducing the up to 8mm play it's allowed to a minimum, which is ok. Applying pressure afterwards is not. Then they say to turn the tensioner's screw clockwise, moving it from the "release" position, which the ball and little spring are holding it in (per manual above), to the "lock" position, where the little spring and ball will then hold it (per manual above). It seems to me that you are skipping this step -- Nowhere do you adjust/set/turn the screw clockwise as called out in all of the manuals...

    The way I read them all is, they basically want you to eliminate the play (w/o applying pressure) during re/assembly THEN ensure the tensioner screw is in its lock position/mode. An initial setting. Afterwards, the oil pressure will supply tension to the chain and the tensioner will advance (ratchet), taking up additional play. The piston is allowed up to ~8mm of play, but they want it all out whenever the engine is off.

    I do see that you might be able to use a pick to turn the screw just enough to release it a step but not enough to put it in the release position/mode, if you were very careful. And that it would probably take the slack back up the first time you ran the engine. But working blind with an unconfirmed <8mm = ~1/3" of slop and unconfirmed finger position would be beyond my comfort range, especially knowing that ignores several manuals saying to remove the cover and turn the screw clockwise.

    Yes you can ensure the screw is turned clockwise you can also confirm the notches are locked and you can measure extension without removing the cover. But yeah make sure there locked before closing. Mine where easy. But as for comfort zone, I don't do anything I am not comfortable with neither should anyone else. Fact is you could describe this a hundred different ways and their will still be people that can not do it.

  8. #18
    Administrator Ron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giamanut View Post
    Yes you can ensure the screw is turned clockwise you can also confirm the notches are locked and you can measure extension without removing the cover. But yeah make sure there locked before closing. Mine where easy. But as for comfort zone, I don't do anything I am not comfortable with neither should anyone else. Fact is you could describe this a hundred different ways and their will still be people that can not do it.
    Now I'm confused. When I asked if you were re-setting the tensioner(s) the same way, you sad no and that they just pop back and lock on a tooth. Which I thought meant you were not resetting the screw at all (because it was done automatically). I.E. No mention of a different way to turn the screw back to "set", making it easy on yours....
    Guessing from experience and assuming we're on the same page now, if one can, say, feel that the screw was moving from release to set and see that the mechanism ratcheted (without pressuring the chain ;-), I wouldn't see any red flags for most people already playing with the cam - As long as they understand that it needs to be done.

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