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Thread: You may try and talk me out of getting a DeLorean

  1. #21
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    - What's rear visibility like when backing?
    Having driven many cars, the Delorean rear visibility is not a problem at all. Backup cameras are a nice luxury for extra insurance, but this car suffers no more backing up visibility problems than any other car modern or old. The real visibility issue is other cars hanging out in your blind spot taking pictures and recording your car on video. Makes it hard to change lanes! But no less, the visibility to check in the lane is great... just have to watch out for those paparazzi!

    - Is it a "compact". I know the doors much it much easier to park in confined spaces.
    It is definitely a small car. While several folks have commented on it being wide, once again, compared to modern cars, it is far from wide. And as noted, the clearance to open the doors is remarkable.


    - Can a booster seat be stowed in the area behind the seats (small child)
    The space back there is big enough to stow it depending on the size of the booster. But as others have said, it's not a seat back there.


    - There's no computer/ECU as such is there? I think this ought to be obvious from 1981, but I have to ask.
    Nothing fancy.


    - Non leather interiors - I'm vegan, so any rework here is gonna be fabric or faux. Has anyone done this?
    I get it, but depending on the state of the leather seats on the car you purchase, this is a great way to immediately devalue the car. I'd strongly consider whether you really want to do that or not.


    - My final concern here with the car is that it's gonna attract a huge amount of attention, especially as a DD. It's not really a car you'd want to leave unattended for a long, is it?
    Yes, it feels unmatched to anything else I've seen or owned. You always run the risk of folks checking it out unsolicited. But what's really the worst that can happen? They are meant to be enjoyed.

  2. #22
    Senior Member mr_maxime's Avatar
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    I find it harder to park than any of my other cars due to the wide turn radius and lack of power steering. It's trickier to maneuver, but small enough that you're not really worried about hitting other cars

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jangell View Post

    I lived in southern California (Burbank area) with my DeLorean for about a year. That was almost two decades ago, but I didn't find it too bad. But that's me. I didn't live directly in the cities (I don't like cities). I don't like driving it in Boston either, but I don't like driving in Boston period. San Francisco is similar, as I recall.
    I've driven all over the country and even overseas. CA is definitely the most aggressive, by a long way. I used to live in San Diego county and it's gone from busy much of the time to busy all of the time.

    The Bay Area is bad - people driving too fast, always in a hurry, and the street I live just off, people like to drive down the middle turn section, and once in a while, set cars on fire. This is also the
    home of the "Sideshow", and not far from where I live is the notorious "Pit".

    San Francisco itself is a whole other thing - the number of personal modes of travel now is mind-boggling - like something out of the Jetsons. Driving there takes a lot of patience - endless
    construction, expensive/impossible to find parking. I avoid driving if at all possible there. Probably not as bad as London or Manhattan, but still.

  4. #24
    Senior Member DMCVegas's Avatar
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    Long story short, you are not classic car owner material. I'm sorry, but that's just the truth from what I've read. Can that change for you? I don''t know. But at this stage of the game, I wouldn't even recommend a VW bug for you, let alone anything without a warranty.

    If you really want to take on classic car ownership, you need to get your ass in gear and get some grit into you to become a car guy. Now if money for instance is a concern, that's a different story. I don't look down on anyone for not having the cash to complete a repair. But if you're refusing to repair a vehicle because the cost is too much, let alone refuse to complete the repair if it is something you can do yourself, then you don't have the necessary passion for this lifestyle. And passion is exactly what you need to keep you going through those rough times.

    Make no mistake, I spent almost 4 years prior studying the workshop manual and a parts guide. I also asked questions too as you did, which is good, but that's not everything. It's about the kind of questions you ask. You want to know how it handles in bad weather? Um, okay... I never asked that because I didn't care. I knew I was a good enough driver to handle this car. But yeah, with the right tires with a B temperature rating and factory spec sizes (to hell with matching looks), she's fine by my standards. She splashes through floodwater with just a little high-revving after to puke the water out of the alternator. She did well enough in the snow & rain, and even held her own through waste spills on the highway and on gravel roads to boot. A/C is icy cold in the summer, and the heater is as cozy as a swaddled baby in the winter.

    I had a great experience because I had confidence in myself, and no illusions about the car. It was back then an 18 year old used car when I got her. I knew she'd have problems. Didn't know what to expect, but I sure knew I'd deal with whatever she threw at me when the time came. Oh sure, the DeLorean handles well enough...if you're a capable driver. If you're the kind of person who locks up with fear and only knows to slam on the brake pedal, you're gonna be so screwed...with any old car, not just this one. Your common sense and your skill set are the traction control & collision avoidance systems. So no offense, but if you're asking how the car handles in bad weather, or even how difficult it is to backup without a camera, you should probably be more concerned about yourself than any car you might consider buying.

    How is rear visibility? Franco Bertollini says it best:


    https://youtu.be/wTVDpOaTGsc

    Now you said you own an Eos that has a problem with the convertible roof. Yep, I checked out that forum and read up on your problem there, and others you posted about. I'm sorry, but, damn, this isn't the hobby for you. You can't get instant answers to just fix any little problem that comes along. Many fixes themselves are indeed quite simple, and easily completed by most shade tree mechanics. But it is the methodical troubleshooting that costs you. If you're not up to that, which I don't believe that you are given what I've read, then none of this is for you. Which confounds the living shit out of me. How the hell can you compile code, and yet not understand schematics & operational functions & orders by electromechanical systems? Troubleshooting a car is just simple algebra for the most part and is far simpler than coding.

    Anyways, a better question for you here is this: why are you not a "Car guy"? Do cars genuinely not interest you? Is there a negative stereotype about being a "car guy" that you're afraid of being associated with? Are your friends suddenly going to look down upon you? Are you afraid that you're not capable of performing repairs? Now that can possibly all change. You need to study up on the car first. Find a mentor or two, and learn car repair. Starting with what you already have. But are you willing to make that change? I gotta be honest, I once knew another DeLorean owner whom you remind me of very much. His ownership experience was not a pleasant one. More than the DeLorean, you need to ask yourself some serious questions first.

    P.S. On a personal note, I despise leather as an upholstery. Particularly in vehicles. I slide around too much. Cloth grips and hugs me close. I have my seats reupholstered in a nice durable cloth with factory stitching.
    Robert

    Wake me when hockey season returns...

  5. #25
    Under Ron's watchful eye. Glory be to Ron! Michael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMCVegas View Post
    Long story short...

    Glad we got the "short" version!


    You know I'm kidding. I love your posts.

  6. #26
    Stupid Newbie DaraSue's Avatar
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    - time
    - money
    - patience
    - mechanical skills
    - a willingness to learn mechanical skills

    If you don't have at least two or three of the above, owning a DeLorean or any other 30+ year old car is unlikely to be a a very satisfying experience.

    When I bought mine, I'd had a 1987 CRX as a daily driver for my entire adult life. I took it for granted that 30 year old cars could be as reliable as anything else. And they can be, if you're willing to either spend a ton of money up front or spend a ton of money and/or time fixing everything that previous owners have neglected or half-assed. I've driven my DeLorean from one side of the country to the other, and haven't had to call a tow truck by the side of the interstate in 3 years. But I've spent over $20k on top of the original purchase price and a whole lot of my own time and various shops' to get it to that point. Is it worth it? Yeah, but if I had a mortgage payment on a house full of mouths to feed, I would probably feel differently.

    To go along with what Rob said, it does sound like you're used to modern cars. A stock DeLorean lacks many of the conveniences of modern cars. It corners like an SR-71, shifts like a tank and brakes like the Titanic. If you aren't prepared for that, you can get yourself in trouble pretty fast. I've had mine out in supercell thunderstorms and blizzards and it performed adequately but are you willing to risk a $30-50k investment on a road full of dumbasses who think having 4wd means they can and should do 90 in a snowstorm? Are you willing to spend $1000+ per year on insurance that will cover a classic car for a total loss as a daily driver? Are you willing to get your hands dirty troubleshooting problems and/or do you have a trustworthy shop that knows these cars or has mechanics willing to learn (and bear in mind that these cars have been known to develop gremlins that can have even experienced DeLorean mechanics tearing their hair out)?

    You're the only one who can decide what's right for you. But it does sound like you might be better off buying a Honda. Or pretty much any other car manufactured this century.
    Last edited by DaraSue; 11-26-2019 at 11:15 AM.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaraSue View Post
    - time
    - money
    - patience
    - mechanical skills
    - a willingness to learn mechanical skills

    If you don't have at least two or three of the above, owning a DeLorean or any other 30+ year old car is unlikely to be a a very satisfying experience.
    I'd probably add a degree of stubbornness. The money is a way off, but otherwise yes.

    Anyway, yes. Very well put. The answers to date have been extremely informative, and I thank you all. The subtext here is certain philosophy in owning one;
    I get that too.

    But it does sound like you might be better off buying a Honda. Or pretty much any other car manufactured this century.
    Right now, that's unquestionably true. For me, this is a journey in which I get to learn a ton of stuff.

    In the meantime, I'm here, I going to continue to answer questions - perhaps awkward ones to which people think are "obvious". I'd be gladly pointed
    at things which I should read, research etc before I even go near one - and yes, I hope also to be able to help someone work on theirs.
    I may eventually decide this isn't an appropriate choice for me; I asked the questions in order that I might be scared off. That time hasn't come yet.

  8. #28
    Stupid Newbie DaraSue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrChocky View Post
    I'd probably add a degree of stubbornness. The money is a way off, but otherwise yes.
    I want to make sure I'm parsing you correctly - you mean that it's going to be a while before you have the money for the car? I'd definitely recommend waiting until you have a nice savings cushion before buying (if you decide to). Opinions vary as far as financing vs. saving up and paying cash (maybe you've seen the threads on here about that subject) but "this kid is more expensive than I thought/I got downsized/I want to make a downpayment on a house" are frequent refrains in the For Sale section of any classic car forum. The good thing about these cars is that as long as you take care of it and there isn't another financial system meltdown, you'll probably be able to sell it for as much or more than you paid for it if it's no longer feasible to keep it. You seem like you want to consider all the variables, so that's good. I'd recommend budgeting another 60-100% of your purchase price for repairs, just in case (maybe 200% or more if it's a "barn find" that's been sitting for years and needs a ton of work).

    In the meantime, I'm here, I going to continue to answer questions - perhaps awkward ones to which people think are "obvious". I'd be gladly pointed
    at things which I should read, research etc before I even go near one - and yes, I hope also to be able to help someone work on theirs.
    I may eventually decide this isn't an appropriate choice for me; I asked the questions in order that I might be scared off. That time hasn't come yet.
    It's good that you're not rushing into it. I'd definitely recommend getting in touch with owners from this forum or from your local owner's club and attending tech sessions. That could give you a better idea what kinds of work you can expect to do, and an opportunity to do some work yourself with supervision and see if it's something you'd enjoy. Personally I find that there is something intensely satisfying about fixing something yourself and knowing that you've got that problem solved for the foreseeable future. But... it can be intensely frustrating when you can't fix something and end up having to take the Flatbed Ride of Shame. Perseverance (or stubbornness ) to stick with it through all the aggravation is indeed one of the near-universal qualities of a long-term DeLorean owner.

    Good luck with your decision!

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaraSue View Post
    I want to make sure I'm parsing you correctly - you mean that it's going to be a while before you have the money for the car? I'd definitely recommend waiting until you have a nice savings cushion before buying (if you decide to). Opinions vary as far as financing vs. saving up and paying cash (maybe you've seen the threads on here about that subject) but "this kid is more expensive than I thought/I got downsized/I want to make a downpayment on a house" are frequent refrains in the For Sale section of any classic car forum. The good thing about these cars is that as long as you take care of it and there isn't another financial system meltdown, you'll probably be able to sell it for as much or more than you paid for it if it's no longer feasible to keep it. You seem like you want to consider all the variables, so that's good. I'd recommend budgeting another 60-100% of your purchase price for repairs, just in case (maybe 200% or more if it's a "barn find" that's been sitting for years and needs a ton of work).
    Yeah. Well and truly noted. Personal finance happens to be another area of interest of mine, and I know it's foolish to make personal financial predictions, but I have an idea
    of what's coming and I think I can make this work. I know also that it's easy to drop $1-2K on service of a modern car (assuming you get someone else to do it); I think many
    people don't really know the true cost of owning a car of any age.

    I think my goal will be a car at the higher end of the range; that's "sorted" for the major work. But I think patience is going to be my biggest ally here, on both matters.

  10. #30
    Nothing witty here lest it offend
    Join Date:  May 2011

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    Modern cars are forgiving to inattention; this one is not. The vegan thing is stupid. The cows died in 1980. Rumor has it they were drunk on Guiness at the time they were slaughtered.

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