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Thread: After a coolant flush - is the air out?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Dec 2016

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    After a coolant flush - is the air out?

    Last month I did a flush of the coolant. I bled the air following recommendations on this site and in the manual. What is the best way to test and see if there is any issue with air in the cooling system? Still too cold and wintry here to drive, but I've read that you can run the engine in the garage and see if the cooling fans cycle. Does this work as a good test? What should you be looking for as an indication that there is air in the system? Will the console temperature provide advanced warning should there not be coolant flow?

    Thanks for your suggestions.

    Ron

  2. #2
    Senior Member Bitsyncmaster's Avatar
    Join Date:  May 2011

    Location:  Leonardtown, MD

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    My VIN:    03572

    Run your engine watching the temperature gauge. If it starts going above what it normally held at then stop the engine, bleed again and repeat.
    Dave M vin 03572
    http://dm-eng.weebly.com/

  3. #3
    Under Ron's watchful eye. Glory be to Ron! Michael's Avatar
    Join Date:  May 2011

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    My VIN:    None of your business you creepy psycho vin counter...get a life

    Quote Originally Posted by Bitsyncmaster View Post
    Run your engine watching the temperature gauge. If it starts going above what it normally held at then stop the engine, bleed again and repeat.
    Will a coolant exchange machine work on our cars?

  4. #4
    Delorean Guru
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    A coolant flush machine can work on Deloreans if you know how to use it. It is not necessary to use. Since you already replaced your coolant all you have to do now is to top off and bleed any remaining air. The best way is to use a coolant pressure tester and pressurize the system. You don't need a lot of pressure. Once pressurized you let any air out of the radiator by loosening the small hose connected to the top, right side tank of the radiator and the bleeder valve on the water pump. Stop as soon as some coolant comes out. Even with a flush machine you must bleed any air out. The way you do coolant now is to drain as much as you can and then use a vacuum evacuator to remove most of the air. Once you get a vacuum you allow the coolant to get sucked in. This way you minimize any trapped air and don't have to bleed it much if at all. If you notice that you must continually bleed out air or add coolant you either have leaks and/or blown head gaskets. Small amounts of trapped air will eventually bleed out during heating/cooling cycles.
    David Teitelbaum

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