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Thread: Frame swap, how bad was it?

  1. #11
    Delorean Guru
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    Doing MIG properly does take some skill but it is a LOT more expensive than stick. 3/32" rod and you can weld 16 gauge but it isn't the best way to do it. Gas welding does take a bit more skill than MIG but the equipment is a lot cheaper. For a novice IMHO learning gas welding teaches all the basic skills necessary to do any other type of welding and is very forgiving. You can go over your work, you can penetrate as deeply as you have to or go faster to avoid blow-through. You can use the equipment to burn or heat parts or even to make parts. You can do crude heat treating. It is indispensable when taking apart exhaust systems and not break off every bolt. Any well equipped shop will have a gas welding outfit. I have taught people how to MIG weld in 15 minutes but they are very limited in what they can do. Gas welding does take a while longer to learn but once you get it you can do anything.
    David Teitelbaum

  2. #12
    Senior Member
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    I've read through some rusty frame threads looking for one that had tackled my frame problem. Over the years I've kept up pretty good with small chips/cracked epoxy by Dremel sanding it down and POR 15 covered by Rustoleum smoke grey. But now I've found rust inside the frame. Using a small cheap t.v. inspection camera from Harbor Freight I took a peak into the rear shock towers through rather large factory holes on either side of the top of the transmission level. On both sides the area around the bottom had significant rust not visible except internally. Then I started sticking the camera in every frame hole big enough to fit. More rust. Not enough to trash the frame but enough to eventually rot through from the inside out. I am going to use Eastwood Internal Frame Coating that includes a 2 foot hose with a 360 degree nozzle on the end.
    I would like to have taken pictures but like I said the t.v. inspection camera is cheap black and white.

  3. #13
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdrusn View Post
    I am going to use Eastwood Internal Frame Coating that includes a 2 foot hose with a 360 degree nozzle on the end.
    I used Eastwood to coat the interior of my roof box. Very good stuff. That hose makes a huge difference in reaching all the nooks and crannies. It does take a little while to uncurl the hose once itís unboxed though. Be sure to get more cans than you think youíll need, and check your progress as you go along. I emptied one can only to find I had missed a spot and had to wait a week for another can to come in.
    DMCF rebuild 2008, Stage II, Eibach

  4. #14
    EFI'd dn010's Avatar
    Join Date:  Jul 2011

    Location:  Florida: Pinellas County

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    Personally I don't believe these products are as good as they claim. I've used POR-15, KBS Coatings among others on various projects not limited to the DeLorean and the results are always the same - the rust came back. It may have taken a few years to a decade or however long (KBS lasted longest of them all before rust reappeared), but the rust returned and that's even after the proper prep (and more $$) recommended by them. To me it seems more of a mental thing - you can cover up rust all you want so it looks nice and you forget about it but ultimately the rust is still there doing its thing especially on scaly unprepared surfaces. On the other hand I do think it does slow down rust to an extent and buy you some time but that's about it. The only effective method I've found is to grind all the rust away - not possible inside the frames many cavities. There are very few options for the rust inside the frame so the Eastwood spray is a good approach but check it from time to time and make sure you get as much epoxy off as possible. It is too bad you didn't have a cam that you could use for pictures, it would be a cool before/after regardless.
    Last edited by dn010; 05-20-2020 at 08:04 PM.
    -----Dan B.

  5. #15
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    If you don't stop the area from getting wet you get more rust. These products, for the most part, encapsulate and convert the surface of the rust to a less oxidized form and they do stop further rusting but not if you continue to get it wet. Even with that being said, the frame flexes, it is only sheet metal, and you get tiny stress cracks where moisture can get to the metal again. Eventually just about every coating fails and once moisture can get to the metal the corrosion continues. The best is hot dipped zinc coating, aka galvanizing. It is self healing and sacrificial. Even that doesn't last forever but it does last a long time. Powder coating would be next best, then epoxy and finally paint. We are talking about mild steel. The Stainless Steel frames are probably the longest lasting option of all.
    David Teitelbaum

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