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Thread: ATF level-dipstick reading

  1. #1
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    ATF level-dipstick reading

    I'm well aware that overfilling ATF just makes it leak more. I recently changed out the fluid. After driving the car and getting it hot, my dipstick shows the fluid level dead on in the middle at the "warm" marking on a consistent basis. The car seems to shift just fine so I'm debating whether I have to add more. I'm also not seeing any of the usual ATF leaks I saw previous to this change (which is nice).

    Does the ATF level need to read at "Hot" or am I risking damage by keeping it at "Warm"?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    Don't add more. The proper way to do a hot check is with a dipstick temp probe per the Renault 4141 manual. Once you hit 80 C (176F), then you check against the hot mark. With the decreased viscosity at the higher temps, the line becomes harder to see. You could pad it against paper to see where the fluid ends. The easiest test is the cold test, which is 20C (68F) +/5C (59-77F).

    This video is pretty in-depth on the procedure.
    Last edited by dmcnc; 06-25-2020 at 04:05 PM.

  3. #3
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    Another note from the 4141 manual: besides leaking, overfilling also makes the hydraulic unit overheat.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmcnc View Post
    Another note from the 4141 manual: besides leaking, overfilling also makes the hydraulic unit overheat.
    Thank you for the guidance. This is critically important to me to get right. Really appreciate the details on this.

    Steve

  5. #5
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    The "proper" way to check the level is in your Workshop Manual G:04:02. You probably need only about a pint to get the level to HOT. Don't worry about any damage being a pint off but for piece of mind you may want to add it. Not only is the level important, the smell and color is too. Since you just changed it, it should be good. If you aren't leaking, the level should not be changing, but you should check it once a month and before any long trips along with your other checks (tire pressure, engine oil level, coolant level, lights, etc). Also on the automatic the diff level is separate and must also be checked. For that refer to G:05:01.
    David Teitelbaum

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by David T View Post
    The "proper" way to check the level is in your Workshop Manual G:04:02..
    Thanks David.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by David T View Post
    The "proper" way to check the level is in your Workshop Manual G:04:02. You probably need only about a pint to get the level to HOT. Don't worry about any damage being a pint off but for piece of mind you may want to add it. Not only is the level important, the smell and color is too. Since you just changed it, it should be good. If you aren't leaking, the level should not be changing, but you should check it once a month and before any long trips along with your other checks (tire pressure, engine oil level, coolant level, lights, etc). Also on the automatic the diff level is separate and must also be checked. For that refer to G:05:01.
    That section's vagueness in the Delorean workshop manual is misleading. If you only run a cold engine until the cooling fans turn on, I guarantee you will not get 176F trans fluid with a dipstick probe (more like 100F).

  8. #8
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  9. #9
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    When DMC wrote the Workshop Manual they had to have used the 4141 manual to create their Workshop Manual. DMC chose to use a slightly different method, probably because the temperature range of the transaxle is a little different because the engine is in the rear. There are a few instances where DMC chose not to do things quite the same way as the 4141 manual does them. In those cases you should defer to the DMC manual. As for the level, there is an acceptable range. Because of the large volume of fluid it expands and contracts a lot due to the temperature changes. The amount is affected by the ambient temperature and the temperature of the motor. Try to stay withing that range.
    David Teitelbaum

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron View Post
    My dipstick looks different...

    IMG_1596.jpg

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