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Thread: Fuel accumulator removal / bypass

  1. #1
    '82 T3 FABombjoy's Avatar
    Join Date:  May 2011

    Location:  Lansing, MI

    Posts:    1,099

    My VIN:    10270

    Fuel accumulator removal / bypass

    I just finished bypassing the accumulator and wanted to share my thoughts.

    First, totally worth removing. I now have a rubber-free fuel system. I replaced the accumulator in 99 or 2000 and it was leaking into return port. It serves no meaningful purpose with EFI. It just sits there threatening to leak-through and bypass fuel back in to the tank, taking rubber shrapnel with it. It makes strange noises when you turn the car off.

    If I did it again I would not spend the time & money on parts to adapt the stock fuel feed line, especially having to work through the accumulator port. The lack of space and strategic use of impact tools, pry bars, and short-length wrenches to keep the stock lines from kinking make it challenging. Two lengths of nylon fuel tubing ran in tandem with the heater core lines would be far easier.

    After removing the accumulator & fittings, I used Eaton p/n 15.163-6-6 to adapt the feed elbow to -6AN


    Before:


    After:


    A new braided hose routed where the stock hard line was. I'm sure if I spent more time I could have found fittings that would mate to the "bulk ring" 24 degree flare, but the 2 or 3 that I purchased would not fit correctly. Initially I'd hoped to run new aluminum hard line but the routing of it wasn't going to work without drilling a hole through the frame or removing the body. So a new braided line was the quickest way to finish the job.


    New fuel filter, bottom fitting converted from elbow to banjo. Allows any style of K-jet filter to be used.
    If I'd converted to nylon lines, a quick disconnect EFI filter could be used.


    To plug the return line, a chunk of original hard line (I think from the old fuel return pipe) w/ the bulk ring/olive/ferrule & nut was used. I just soldered in a random bolt and screwed it back in to the return T. Low fi but free. You can see it dangling there in one of the above photos too. Really a piece of rubber line could have been attached and plugged but I didn't want some vestigial rubber appendix threatening to leak.


    Peace of mind, and the only cost is that I will reek of gasoline for the next few days.
    Luke S :: 10270 :: 82 Grey 5-Speed :: Single Watercooled T3 .60/.48 :: Borla Exhaust :: MSD Ignition :: MS3X Fully SFI Odd-fire EFI :: DevilsOwn Methanol Injection

  2. #2
    Senior Member powerline84's Avatar
    Join Date:  Mar 2015

    Location:  TN

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    Looks nice man. To piggy back on Luke I ended up doing a similar bypass and accumulator removal when I first went to the efi conversion on the prv. The reason was we figured out on the Dyno that the accumulator had failed in a way that it was bypassing so much fuel back to the tank it couldn't maintain a consistent fuel pressure and was causing starvation issues on high demand runs inconsistently.

    So...I would say if you do an efi swap you absolutely should just ditch the accumulator and avoid the Hassles...it may prematurely solve a problem you have not yet discovered lol.


    I also switched to the Delphi pump and ditched the Houston huko.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date:  Nov 2020

    Location:  Boston

    Posts:    35

    Luke,
    Excellent write up. I just removed the fuel accumulator a few days ago in preparation for EFI, but I couldn't find the appropriate fittings to connect the fuel lines. I ended up cutting the male fittings off the fuel accumulator and welding them together , creating a male-male fitting, but I'd like to eliminate that short rubber/nylon hose from the feed line. Where did get the an-6 fitting?
    Last edited by Tom_hd02; 06-17-2021 at 05:20 PM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Bitsyncmaster's Avatar
    Join Date:  May 2011

    Location:  Leonardtown, MD

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    My VIN:    03572

    Do any modern cars use an accumulator? One function of the accumulator is to smooth out the pressure pulses of the fuel pump.
    Dave M vin 03572
    http://dm-eng.weebly.com/

  5. #5
    Senior Member powerline84's Avatar
    Join Date:  Mar 2015

    Location:  TN

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    My VIN:    2706

    Quote Originally Posted by Bitsyncmaster View Post
    Do any modern cars use an accumulator? One function of the accumulator is to smooth out the pressure pulses of the fuel pump.
    A few modern ls Cars use a regulator/filter combo . Most people who want a simple fuel system for an ls swap or many other swaps use a 2003 Corvette ls wix or ac Delco filter regulator....puts out 58psi constant and also filters the fuel.

  6. #6
    '82 T3 FABombjoy's Avatar
    Join Date:  May 2011

    Location:  Lansing, MI

    Posts:    1,099

    My VIN:    10270

    Quote Originally Posted by Bitsyncmaster View Post
    One function of the accumulator is to smooth out the pressure pulses of the fuel pump.
    I suspect this is DeLorean folklore. I guess I've never seen anyone pressure log just the fuel pump & no injection but I'd suspect it's fairly smooth.

    CIS being continuous would be less susceptible to pressure spikes at the engine compared to solenoid injectors. For EFI that seems to typically be handled by fuel pressure dampers rather than something as large as the accumulator.
    Last edited by FABombjoy; 06-17-2021 at 07:44 PM.
    Luke S :: 10270 :: 82 Grey 5-Speed :: Single Watercooled T3 .60/.48 :: Borla Exhaust :: MSD Ignition :: MS3X Fully SFI Odd-fire EFI :: DevilsOwn Methanol Injection

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