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Thread: Questions after pulling the motor and transmission

  1. #1
    DeLorean owner since 2011 Stainless's Avatar
    Join Date:  May 2011

    Location:  Syracuse, UT

    Posts:    615

    My VIN:    2087

    Questions after pulling the motor and transmission

    The motor and manual transmission are officially out of my car, all started by me snapping an engine mount bolt in the frame. My "while I'm in there" list is growing at a rapid pace. Here are several questions and/or observances for you all:

    It's clear that the motor and tranny have never been removed from the car. It was a bugger to separate the two from each other as the splines did not want to let go without a fight. I am fairly confident that my rear main seal is leaking and I plan on replacing it. My car has over 50k miles, but is easy to shift. My hunch is that I should replace the clutch, pilot bearing, etc since I have to remove them to get to the rear main seal anyway. Is that generally a good practice on a 40 year old original clutch, or would I just be throwing away money unnecessarily?
    PXL_20210815_035411690.jpg PXL_20210815_035424703.jpg

    I also discovered two numbers on my frame: one from a sticker on the back and another in the metal. For reference, my car is #2087. I'm assuming these numbers are not significant.
    PXL_20210807_220200800.jpg PXL_20210814_235246439.jpg

    I also found a lot of dirt and buildup in the rear pontoons on each side, but it was much dirtier on the passenger side. I was very surprised to see how much the bolts have eroded away, especially on a car that doesn't have much corrosion. I am planning on replacing them, but the parts manual shows M6 rivnuts here where my car has these M6 bolts, nut, and some washers. I'm wondering if my car's setup is typical or not.
    PXL_20210814_234414202.jpg PXL_20210814_235339798.jpg

    The original wrap on the wiring harness has held up extremely well for its age. There are a handful of places where it has worn through and other places where it has completely come apart, like near the alternator. Is electrical tape our best option to re-wrap, or is there something better out there? If the original wrapping is electrical tape, then it must be some really nice stuff and better than the kind I use as it doesn't seem to stand the test of time when I use it.
    PXL_20210807_205627645.jpg PXL_20210807_205617248.jpg

    The flywheel inspection plate was just loosely sitting on the frame, which I have known ever since I first crawled under the car, but now that the tranny is out, does it need to be loose, or should I reattach it before I put the motor back in the car?
    PXL_20210815_030820489.jpg

    After I removed the transmission and placed it on the ground, I left it leaning a tad on one side and found a bunch of gear oil on the floor the next morning. I clearly did not drain the transmission prior to removal as it isn't that old and I didn't plan on tearing into it. I suspected that my seals around the drive flange need to be replaced. In addition to the leaks, I remembered that I snapped one of the two bolts holding on the clutch slave cylinder when I replaced it around 10 years ago. I'll be drilling that out now that I can access it and it will be more secure. Luckily, it has worked flawlessly for the past 10 years with just the one bolt holding it in place.
    PXL_20210817_172709435.jpg PXL_20210817_172649453.jpg

    I may start a new thread dedicated to just what I need to refresh the exterior of the transmission, but I will need to figure out how to clean the casing, figure out if I am going to be replacing the rusty bolts and washers, clean up all the brackets and hardware, and decide if I I want to paint it or leave it bare aluminum. Decisions, decisions. I'd love any suggestions you might have.
    Last edited by Stainless; 08-18-2021 at 01:08 AM.
    Jared L.

    June '81, manual, black inter. VIN 2087
    Other cars: 2012 Toyota Sienna, 2007 Mazda 6, 1999 Jeep Cherokee
    DeLorean blog: http://deloreanblog.blogspot.com/

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Nov 2019

    Location:  Pittsburgh, PA

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    My VIN:    Yes.

    For most automotive wiring, especially outside the cabin, you want to try and avoid electrical tape; it doesn't last. You want to use harness tape - you'll find this much more satisfactory.

    I have my bumper/fascia removed too, and my pontoons are awful too. I removed the rear rocker panels, the support brackets and at this point too to clean
    them all up - took a long time due to rust and cross threading, etc. At this point, it's easy to also remove the rear quarter panels, make sure all the rivnuts
    are good, etc. I ended up replacing all the side body bolts too (M8 I think) just because.

    Those M6 bolts holding the brackets - I don't know if they were originally rivnuts on my car; but the lower section is subject to a lot of dirt and moister so they might well
    have been replaced by bolts. On mine, one of the bolts had the remnants of a nut rusted on, so I had to get a dremel inside the pontoon.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Jan 2019

    Posts:    161

    Regarding bolts in the pontoon, that pontoon area fills up with rain water through the vents on the quarter panel. I am not at all surprised that the bolts are rotted away. Replace them with stainless ones and you won't have to worry about them again.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Aug 2018

    Posts:    699

    Regarding the numbers you found:

    The frame number is from the frame manufacturer and is irrelevant to the DeLorean. It was simply for inventory purposes. Same goes for the engine number.

    The number on the rear bumper support is the last four digits of a VIN. They frequently did not match the final VIN that was assigned to the car but were generally pretty close. Why the difference? Iím not sure.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    Location:  Yardley, PA

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    My VIN:    16795

    If by flywheel inspection plate you mean part 101073, I would just leave it off. All it seems to do is make it hard to remove the transmission. When the engine and transmission are in the car its difficult to remove the bolts that hold on the plate.

  6. #6
    EFI'd dn010's Avatar
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    I'd replace the clutch/bearing/pressure plate since you've already got it apart.

    Hint: I know everyone is about "supporting your vendor" but I can't go along with that for the clutch kit specifically. Do yourself a favor and save money by buying a Valeo clutch kit #52352501. $166 on Rock, $190 on Amazon or upwards of $300 from vendors. Before rockauto offered this kit and the lowest price, I've learned at least one vendor is buying these clutch kits on Amazon, marking them up & reselling them (they left the Amazon slip in the box they shipped to me). In 2018, I paid $115 for a clutch kit on Amazon, not sure why vendors need to charge nearly or over double for the same thing but, at least you have other options and you can always spend the difference with your favorite vendor on other things you need.
    Last edited by dn010; 08-18-2021 at 11:57 AM.
    -----Dan B.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by dn010 View Post
    I'd replace the clutch/bearing/pressure plate since you've already got it apart.

    Hint: I know everyone is about "supporting your vendor" but I can't go along with that for the clutch kit specifically. Do yourself a favor and save money by buying a Valeo clutch kit #52352501. $166 on Rock, $190 on Amazon or upwards of $300 from vendors. Before rockauto offered this kit and the lowest price, I've learned at least one vendor is buying these clutch kits on Amazon, marking them up & reselling them (they left the Amazon slip in the box they shipped to me). In 2018, I paid $115 for a clutch kit on Amazon, not sure why vendors need to charge nearly or over double for the same thing but, at least you have other options and you can always spend the difference with your favorite vendor on other things you need.
    Because they can. As you probably know, mark-up or some kind or another is pretty common from mechanics. A customer can at least be certain it's the correct type for the car without running the risk of buying something that doesn't - at least in theory, I know vendor replacement parts that aren't a great fit. The best example would be nuts and bolts, which I've talked to one vendor about - the markup is significant. But you can also waste a lot of time looking for uncommon sizes (ask me how I know).

    For someone who isn't super familiar with car parts, getting from a vendor can make a lot of sense and save anxiety. There are parts I've bought from vendors that I wouldn't get from them second time around, since there are cheaper alternatives that I now know about.

    As for the clutch, mentally noted, since I'm sure I'll eventually need to do it. It's great that we have so many options.

  8. #8
    EFI'd dn010's Avatar
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    Questions after pulling the motor and transmission

    I want to emphasize that my post said "the clutch kit specifically." Aside from this specific kit being listed as being DeLorean specific, I think it's pretty clear when you find an Amazon Valeo 52352501 slip in your box from a vendor, that the vendors are selling the Valeo 52352501 kits; there aren't other mystery Valeo kits floating around out there and they aren't piecing kits together from different cars. I don't think that should warrant a mark of up nearly double. If you absolutely must buy a Valeo 52352501 from a vendor instead of a Valeo 52352501 kit from Rock/Amazon etc. so youíre sure youíre getting the correct parts, DMCH at least gives you the rear main and pilot bearing with theirs making it more reasonable.


    Quote Originally Posted by MrChocky View Post
    Because they can. As you probably know, mark-up or some kind or another is pretty common from mechanics. A customer can at least be certain it's the correct type for the car without running the risk of buying something that doesn't - at least in theory, I know vendor replacement parts that aren't a great fit. The best example would be nuts and bolts, which I've talked to one vendor about - the markup is significant. But you can also waste a lot of time looking for uncommon sizes (ask me how I know).

    For someone who isn't super familiar with car parts, getting from a vendor can make a lot of sense and save anxiety. There are parts I've bought from vendors that I wouldn't get from them second time around, since there are cheaper alternatives that I now know about.

    As for the clutch, mentally noted, since I'm sure I'll eventually need to do it. It's great that we have so many options.
    Last edited by dn010; 08-18-2021 at 01:14 PM.
    -----Dan B.

  9. #9
    EFI'd dn010's Avatar
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    To comment on your broken engine mount bolt. These can seize in the aluminum lower block. Naturally, you'll want to take something and swing at it to get it free but don't or you'll break the ear off of the lower block. I drilled a few small holes down to the middle of the bolt from the inside of the aluminum mount, soaked it in PB for a while, heated up the aluminum and then wrenched down on a socket that slipped over the threaded side of the bolt that didn't break, in order to pull the bolt out.

    Edit: Disregard, I missed where you said it snapped in the frame.
    Last edited by dn010; 08-18-2021 at 02:09 PM.
    -----Dan B.

  10. #10
    DeLorean owner since 2011 Stainless's Avatar
    Join Date:  May 2011

    Location:  Syracuse, UT

    Posts:    615

    My VIN:    2087

    Quote Originally Posted by dn010 View Post
    To comment on your broken engine mount bolt. These can seize in the aluminum lower block. Naturally, you'll want to take something and swing at it to get it free but don't or you'll break the ear off of the lower block. I drilled a few small holes down to the middle of the bolt from the inside of the aluminum mount, soaked it in PB for a while, heated up the aluminum and then wrenched down on a socket that slipped over the threaded side of the bolt that didn't break, in order to pull the bolt out.

    Edit: Disregard, I missed where you said it snapped in the frame.
    While we're talking about the studs that goes through the aluminum lower block, mine appear to be seized, although I haven't taken a sledge to them to try and knock it free. They do appear to have plenty of corrosion.

    Since I do have the motor out, how realistic would it be to successfully press it out with a tool like a vice or ball joint press? In my mind, that eliminates the possibility of breaking the ear off the lower block, but if the stud has expanded and fused to the aluminum, it would seem like pressing it out might be risky too. Thoughts?
    Jared L.

    June '81, manual, black inter. VIN 2087
    Other cars: 2012 Toyota Sienna, 2007 Mazda 6, 1999 Jeep Cherokee
    DeLorean blog: http://deloreanblog.blogspot.com/

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