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Thread: Converting Manual to Automatic

  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Nov 2019

    Location:  Pittsburgh, PA

    Posts:    346

    My VIN:    Yes.

    The only correct resolution at this point is to get a second DeLorean.

  2. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date:  Oct 2021

    Posts:    11

    Quote Originally Posted by MrChocky View Post
    The only correct resolution at this point is to get a second DeLorean.
    Best… reply… so… far. 😂

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Dec 2018

    Posts:    839

    I understand the OP. I love driving my 5 speed……………except in crawling bumper to bumper traffic. Ever been on I-95 crawling for five miles? Not quite ready to trade for the auto……yet.

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Jun 2011

    Posts:    4,721

    My VIN:    3937

    Quote Originally Posted by MrChocky View Post
    An incomplete list of additional auto components is:

    Second WOT switch.
    Auto trans computer and governor cable.
    Auto trans itself.
    Obviously shifter and linkage.
    Auto trans fluid cooler pipe (just a coolant pipe on manuals, but is a little heat exchanger between ATF and coolant on the autos. You'll need the pipe, bracket and connection hoses if they aren't already dangling from your donor auto trans).

    ATF dipstick tube and bracket (top of tube attaches to front side of engine).

    Additional vacuum tubing connection that runs from the front tip of the auto trans back to the engine block (you'll need the little rubber hose off the vacuum modulator, the tube itself and the brackets that hold it in place).

    Auto pedal box (and auto trans uses a larger brake pedal rubber pad too).

    The diagnostics plug contraption that comes off the shift computer attaches right near the ballast resistor (bracket may be needed). Most of the other shift computer connections go right into the trans and are just zip tied out of the way... which is important because one of them goes above the exhaust crossover pipe and needs to not be lying on it getting melted).

    Auto trans mounts (complete set for both sides including frame bracket and trans bracket, rubber middle, nuts, bolts, washers, etc.)

    The shifter style changed part way through the VINs. Whichever style you go with, you'll need those clips and pieces and whatnot that were meant for it as it's not all interchangeable.

    A special 5-point harness seatbelt assembly to hold you back firmly in that seat... you know, because of the neck-breaking added performance from the automatic.


    Sept. 81, auto, black interior

  5. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date:  Oct 2021

    Posts:    11

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    Auto trans fluid cooler pipe (just a coolant pipe on manuals, but is a little heat exchanger between ATF and coolant on the autos. You'll need the pipe, bracket and connection hoses if they aren't already dangling from your donor auto trans).

    ATF dipstick tube and bracket (top of tube attaches to front side of engine).

    Additional vacuum tubing connection that runs from the front tip of the auto trans back to the engine block (you'll need the little rubber hose off the vacuum modulator, the tube itself and the brackets that hold it in place).

    Auto pedal box (and auto trans uses a larger brake pedal rubber pad too).

    The diagnostics plug contraption that comes off the shift computer attaches right near the ballast resistor (bracket may be needed). Most of the other shift computer connections go right into the trans and are just zip tied out of the way... which is important because one of them goes above the exhaust crossover pipe and needs to not be lying on it getting melted).

    Auto trans mounts (complete set for both sides including frame bracket and trans bracket, rubber middle, nuts, bolts, washers, etc.)

    The shifter style changed part way through the VINs. Whichever style you go with, you'll need those clips and pieces and whatnot that were meant for it as it's not all interchangeable.

    A special 5-point harness seatbelt assembly to hold you back firmly in that seat... you know, because of the neck-breaking added performance from the automatic.
    I think I’ll stick with the manual. 😂😂

  6. #16
    LS1 DMC Nicholas R's Avatar
    Join Date:  Jun 2011

    Location:  Orlando, Florida

    Posts:    2,730

    My VIN:    01643

    Club(s):   (DCF) (DCO) (DCUK)

    Quote Originally Posted by WHO1DMC View Post
    OK Just spitballing here. Can the peddle be modified for a lighter peddle return spring? How heavy is that thing? Or roller barings instead of solid bushings?

    Remember just ideas I could think of to possibly make a difference in a easier way.

    Dave B.
    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny C View Post
    Ooohhhhh, now there ya go... That's a great question. I'd entertain that option for sure. Why IS that thing so heavy? Anyone successfully made it less difficult to press down on?
    The pedal return spring and bushings have little to nothing to do with the weight of the clutch pedal. The pedal weight is a function of the diaphragm spring on the clutch pressure plate, and the ratio of diameters between the master and slave cylinders. Some clutch pressure plate springs are heavier than others. I remember Hervey used to sell multiple different pressure plates with different clamp forces; not sure what the current Valeo offering is. In the LS DMC world, most of us are now using an aftermarket 350z pressure plate and wow do they have a heavy spring; significantly higher than stock.

    I don't recall off hand what the stock cylinder bores are (I know Josh S. has played around with them a bit though), but the stiffness of the pedal is also based on the difference in bore diameters. The smaller the master cylinder bore is compared to the slave cylinder, the easier the pedal will be to press because you're moving less fluid per unit of stroke. The downside here is that you'll have to push the pedal farther because you still need to displace the same overall amount of fluid if you want to disengage the clutch.

    In the end it's all about finding a balance between bore and stroke length. You could make the pedal as light as a feather if the master cylinder bore was small enough, but you'd be moving so little fluid as you pushed the pedal that you'd need a mile of stroke to disengage the clutch.

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Jun 2016

    Location:  Austin MN

    Posts:    350

    My VIN:    03500

    Well we need a person with adventurous spirits to come up with a boosted clutch alternative. There's probably going to be a market for it in the near future. Just saying because we have a power steering alternative and we're not getting younger.😁




    Dave B.

  8. #18
    LS1 DMC Nicholas R's Avatar
    Join Date:  Jun 2011

    Location:  Orlando, Florida

    Posts:    2,730

    My VIN:    01643

    Club(s):   (DCF) (DCO) (DCUK)

    Quote Originally Posted by WHO1DMC View Post
    Well we need a person with adventurous spirits to come up with a boosted clutch alternative. There's probably going to be a market for it in the near future. Just saying because we have a power steering alternative and we're not getting younger.��

    Dave B.
    If it's that important to you, you could play around with it yourself. Wilwood's line of compact remote reservoir master cylinders can be made to fit the DeLorean's clutch system fairly easily.

    https://www.wilwood.com/MasterCylind...ter%20Cylinder

    They have bores ranging from 13/16" down to 1/2". According to a post I read on the UK Forum, the stock bore size is 13/16" so there should be plenty of opportunity to test lowering the bore. I've considered looking into it myself but the weight of the pedal (even with the big pressure plate) has never bothered me enough to do so.

  9. #19
    LS Swapper Josh's Avatar
    Join Date:  Mar 2013

    Location:  SK, Canada

    Posts:    2,375

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    Quote Originally Posted by WHO1DMC View Post
    Well we need a person with adventurous spirits to come up with a boosted clutch alternative. There's probably going to be a market for it in the near future. Just saying because we have a power steering alternative and we're not getting younger.😁




    Dave B.
    This has been done before by Tom Neiland, with a remote mount master cylinder (the type mounted under the floor in hot rods)
    It was found it provided too much assist and made the clutch feel extremely vague almost undrivable.

    I modified my pedal box (actually started with an automatic box) to make as long of a clutch pedal as possible and benefit from the leverage. The stock clutch pedal setup has very little leverage and extra friction due to multiple linkages. its a very poor design.
    I have a very heavy performance clutch and the pedal is comfortable.
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  10. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Aug 2018

    Posts:    713

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post

    Auto pedal box.
    I don’t think that is necessary. You could remove the clutch pedal components, are simply leave them in. Either way you should be able to connect the appropriate gas pedal and brake pedal components without an issue.

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