FRAMING JOHN DELOREAN - ON VOD www.framingjohndeloreanfilm.com
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Brass bolt on mixture unit broken

  1. #1
    Mad scientist DrWin's Avatar
    Join Date:  May 2020

    Location:  Denmark

    Posts:    241

    My VIN:    10207

    Brass bolt on mixture unit broken

    Old injury, but I thought I'd take care of it now that the mixture unit is out of the car and I'm waiting for my induction heater:
    DSC_0506.jpg
    How do I get this miserable little bugger out?
    Please excuse the crudity of this DeLorean as I didn't have time to repair it yet.
    VIN 10207 - December '81, Gray Interior, 3-speed automatic, stock PRV engine.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date:  Jun 2011

    Posts:    63

    20220111_155825.jpg
    I have the same issue and reluctant to use easy out.
    Going to try a different method - will let you know if it works...

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Jan 2019

    Posts:    199

    Quote Originally Posted by DrWin View Post
    Old injury, but I thought I'd take care of it now that the mixture unit is out of the car and I'm waiting for my induction heater:
    DSC_0506.jpg
    How do I get this miserable little bugger out?
    Us a sharp drill bit as the piece is brass (obviously) and use oil as you drill a hole in its center. Then slowly use an easy out, those brass bolts have an oring at the end of them that seals it which is why they are tough to get out, they are not corroded in. Don't use an induction heater on it.

    I used an easy out on mine as the PO tried to adjust it and snapped it (it was also backed out a bit so it had to come out). Turning the easy out slowly extracted it cleanly with no issues, for me.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Bitsyncmaster's Avatar
    Join Date:  May 2011

    Location:  Leonardtown, MD

    Posts:    8,468

    My VIN:    03572

    Quote Originally Posted by DrWin View Post
    Old injury, but I thought I'd take care of it now that the mixture unit is out of the car and I'm waiting for my induction heater:
    DSC_0506.jpg
    How do I get this miserable little bugger out?
    I don't think an induction heater would work on brass or aluminum. Probably not even stainless steel.
    Dave M vin 03572
    http://dm-eng.weebly.com/

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  May 2011

    Location:  Northern NJ

    Posts:    8,232

    My VIN:    10757 1st place Concourse 1998

    An induction heater (or any kind of heat or spray) is not necessary because it is not stuck because of corrosion. All you need is some way to mechanically attach to it. Either try cutting a slot in it with a die grinder or Dremel to use a screwdriver or drilling into it to use an Ezy-Out or a reverse (left hand) drill or even drill and tap it and stick a bolt in it. As mentioned, it is hard to turn because of an "O" ring.
    David Teitelbaum

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  Dec 2016

    Posts:    409

    Quote Originally Posted by Bitsyncmaster View Post
    I don't think an induction heater would work on brass or aluminum. Probably not even stainless steel.
    Induction heaters will work on any metal that conducts electricity. There is an often heard misconception that induction heaters will only work on metal that can be magnetized. Not the case, any metal that can conduct electrical current can be heated. However, metals that have lower electrical resistance are more difficult to heat with induction. So copper, aluminum, and brass which present a lower resistance to electric current take longer for an induction heater to heat up. Steel has a higher resistance and will heat relatively quickly. Dave is right that aluminum or brass will not heat up as easily as steel. It will take longer for the induction heater to work with those materials. That's the reason cast iron pans are preferred for an induction stovetop.

    No, I'm no induction heater expert. I was (and still am) considering getting an induction heater. I spent hours down the google rabbit-hole looking into this.
    Ron

  7. #7
    Administrator Ron's Avatar
    Join Date:  Jun 2011

    Location:  North GA

    Posts:    5,955

    Club(s):   (SEDOC) (DCUK)

    Since, as D:01:13 says, they are not used on a DeLorean, why not use epoxy...??

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date:  May 2011

    Location:  Burnsville MN-Moving to Kalispell MT. in June 20111

    Posts:    880

    My VIN:    2691

    brass bolts....

    I thought those were the bolts we're supposed to
    leave tight. opened they will give you vacuum leaks....?

  9. #9
    Mad scientist DrWin's Avatar
    Join Date:  May 2020

    Location:  Denmark

    Posts:    241

    My VIN:    10207

    Cool Victory!

    Used a diamond bur to cut a slot in the screw, and used a straight/flat screwdriver to screw it out. Relatively easy.
    DSC_0512.jpg
    Please excuse the crudity of this DeLorean as I didn't have time to repair it yet.
    VIN 10207 - December '81, Gray Interior, 3-speed automatic, stock PRV engine.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date:  Jun 2011

    Posts:    63

    Quote Originally Posted by DrWin View Post
    Used a diamond bur to cut a slot in the screw, and used a straight/flat screwdriver to screw it out. Relatively easy.
    DSC_0512.jpg
    20220125_160459.jpg
    I tried to secure a hex nut but that didn't work, but your suggestion did! Thanks.

    Robert

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •