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Thread: Replaced engine bay lines - banjo / washer leaks

  1. #11
    President, DeLorean Industries
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    Hi Dave, we would reach out directly but have sold line kits to multiple Dave's recently and are unsure which one to contact. We haven't received any requests for technical advice from you, but I can be reached directly at [email protected] to further assist with any technical help required.

    Regards
    Josh Bengston
    DeLorean Industries
    www.deloreanindustries.com Every Detail Matters

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bitsyncmaster View Post
    I've re-used copper washers many times without leaks. Everyone says one time use.

    Try installing the leaking line without one washer (you do know you need a washer on each side of the banjo fitting?) and see if the banjo bolt is bottoming out so it can't crush the washer.
    This! I can’t say I’ve used them “many” times, but a few times and they worked fine. It’s kind of like unlock nuts. Technically, you should throw them away after one use, but they work again. (Even the locking part)

  3. #13
    Stupid Newbie DaraSue's Avatar
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    I've taken the lines off the distributor every time I've had my intake off (4 or 5 now, I've lost count) and every time I've had to tighten some of the bolts past spec. I've used washers from a couple of different vendors and also the ones off the shelf from O'Reilly and they've always been fine once I got them tight. I tighten them to the max and then another fraction of a turn if they need it. Haven't broken one yet, knock on wood...

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaraSue View Post
    I've taken the lines off the distributor every time I've had my intake off (4 or 5 now, I've lost count) and every time I've had to tighten some of the bolts past spec....
    I SWEAR the main fuel line bolt was way over torqued, took both hands on the ratchet, nearly all my strength to break it free. I felt the engine move against the mounts before it let go. Maybe rust had something to do with it but still, no way that was spec, thought I would need to get out the breaker bar.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delorean Industries View Post
    Hi Dave, we would reach out directly but have sold line kits to multiple Dave's recently and are unsure which one to contact. We haven't received any requests for technical advice from you, but I can be reached directly at [email protected] to further assist with any technical help required.

    Regards
    Josh Bengston
    DeLorean Industries
    Thanks Josh, I'll reach out, honestly hadn't thought of that.

    Just to be clear, did not intended this post as criticism of DPI products, I like them fine so far. Admittedly I was a little disappointed extra crush washers weren't included in the kit as it seems to me unlikely to successfully complete the install with just the exact number, but at this point I've been through so many a few extra wouldn't have helped anyway. I should have ordered another complete set.

  6. #16
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    Ive seen some new bolts that are too long, and they bottom out before enough crush can be achieved on the copper washer.
    using the correct diameter washer is key too, so that enough crush is achieved

    when doing fuel lines...

    rule 1- always buy way more washers than needed.
    rule 2 - NEVER over torque in an attempt to try to stop a leak. you can crack the FD or the WUR, etc
    rule 3- bolt length and washer thickness is critical

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark w View Post
    Ive seen some new bolts that are too long, and they bottom out before enough crush can be achieved on the copper washer.
    using the correct diameter washer is key too, so that enough crush is achieved

    when doing fuel lines...

    rule 1- always buy way more washers than needed.
    rule 2 - NEVER over torque in an attempt to try to stop a leak. you can crack the FD or the WUR, etc
    rule 3- bolt length and washer thickness is critical
    rule 4 - you are only allowed to drop 2 washers in the valley.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark w View Post
    Ive seen some new bolts that are too long, and they bottom out before enough crush can be achieved on the copper washer.
    using the correct diameter washer is key too, so that enough crush is achieved

    when doing fuel lines...

    rule 1- always buy way more washers than needed.
    rule 2 - NEVER over torque in an attempt to try to stop a leak. you can crack the FD or the WUR, etc
    rule 3- bolt length and washer thickness is critical
    I had this happen to me too. Was the six bolts used on the injectors. Just a little bit too long and they bottomed out before getting a good seal. Ended up using my old bolts while I ordered different replacements.

    Do you have your old bolts still? You could try using those in the places where it's still leaking.


    Sept. 81, auto, black interior

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    I had this happen to me too. Was the six bolts used on the injectors. Just a little bit too long and they bottomed out before getting a good seal. Ended up using my old bolts while I ordered different replacements.

    Do you have your old bolts still? You could try using those in the places where it's still leaking.
    Yeah, I did keep the old bolts so I can revert back if necessary. I notice (some) of the crush washers seem to have a flat side and a rounded side; does washer orientation matter?

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC-Dave View Post
    I'm using the DPI supplied bolts, which have 3 (slightly smaller?) holes in the walls instead of 2 like the original bolts. No idea if this makes them weaker, or if there are material differences between the 2 which negate this consideration.
    See photo of original on left, DPI on right.
    Like what you've shown in this picture, I suspect it is the subtle difference in the length of your bolts that is causing the leaks. Put the old bolts back in at the places you're having trouble and see if the leaks stop.

    Quote Originally Posted by DMC-Dave View Post
    Yeah, I did keep the old bolts so I can revert back if necessary. I notice (some) of the crush washers seem to have a flat side and a rounded side; does washer orientation matter?
    I'm not aware of the two sides of the copper sealing washers being different. It shouldn't matter. You can use them over again without worry. That's just people being overly cautious or impractical and quoting manuals too much.


    Sept. 81, auto, black interior

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