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Thread: Replaced engine bay lines - banjo / washer leaks

  1. #21
    Administrator Ron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC-Dave View Post
    Yeah, I did keep the old bolts so I can revert back if necessary. I notice (some) of the crush washers seem to have a flat side and a rounded side; does washer orientation matter?
    The washers should be flat on both sides.
    When new, they are soft and crush to form a good seal when torqued down. Torquing them down makes them harder. You can make them soft again by annealing them. (Heat them up until they glow then quench them. Then dress both sides using a circle eight motion while pressing down on fine sandpaper lying on a flat surface. Since you are dealing with gasoline under high pressure, it's usually not worth the risk/effort, imho...Get new ones.)

  2. #22
    Member mhanch's Avatar
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    I did this and used washers from Delorean Go, anmd also ones from a generic kit from Amazon. they are identical. there's no reason to risk reusing a washer. I also used the old bolts and they sealed perfectly. I had help from Toby Perterson to do the main input line and filter since that was more complicated than the top lines, and he gave the setup a clean bill of health. Good on you for doing this and hope it seals up!

  3. #23
    Senior Member Bitsyncmaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron View Post
    The washers should be flat on both sides.
    When new, they are soft and crush to form a good seal when torqued down. Torquing them down makes them harder. You can make them soft again by annealing them. (Heat them up until they glow then quench them. Then dress both sides using a circle eight motion while pressing down on fine sandpaper lying on a flat surface. Since you are dealing with gasoline under high pressure, it's usually not worth the risk/effort, imho...Get new ones.)
    I don't think you quench them after heating to anneal. At least when I was doing aircraft welding to anneal (take out stress from welding) you let the steel cool slowly.
    Dave M vin 03572
    http://dm-eng.weebly.com/

  4. #24
    Administrator Ron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bitsyncmaster View Post
    I don't think you quench them after heating to anneal. At least when I was doing aircraft welding to anneal (take out stress from welding) you let the steel cool slowly.
    My understanding is that it works differently with copper -- With copper, how fast you quince it does not matter a lot.

    I know that jewelers heat and quench copper to soften it after working it. (Seems crushing it would be similar to me.)

    Always worked for me...

  5. #25
    Stupid Newbie DaraSue's Avatar
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    When I was reinstalling mine the first time I called up a DMCH franchise in a fit of frustration after going through several sets of washers and still getting leaks at max torque and the way I remember it, they told me tightening the bolts until the leaks stopped was fine as long as you didn't tighten them enough to break the bolt. When I do it I torque with a torque wrench first and then go over them with a regular ratcheting socket wrench and tighten them (gently) until a small amount of pressure doesn't turn them any more. So far, no issues I'm aware of. A buddy of mine talked to the same shop and they also told him they reuse crush washers all the time

    (When I first got the car I had some VOD work done by a local shop so maybe they screwed something up and that's why I have to overtighten them now, idk...)
    Last edited by DaraSue; 09-06-2022 at 01:25 PM.

  6. #26
    Member mhanch's Avatar
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    This is identical to the set I have: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06Y1HQ1MF...T1zcF9kZXRhaWw

    $12 in washers so I don't screw up my ~$65k car. or you can reuse washers and save some money.

  7. #27
    Senior Member r00b's Avatar
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    I've had some washers with one side that looked like it had been machined flat, it had scratches like you had put it down on sandpaper and dragged it in one direction. Of course they leaked, I had to sand it sort of the way you are sanding them to ensure they wouldn't leak. I make banjo to quick connect fittings and then make my own fuel lines with nylon hose, If I need to remove or replace a line I leave the banjo fitting stays behind and I just remove the line. It makes replacing the fuel filter a breeze but I do need some copper washers for that when I swap over the fittings to the new filter.

    IMG_20201013_112145.jpg

    When I had this idea, it was hard to find fittings like these. I had to make my own, so I have all the tools now to do it. If there's interest I could make more and put them up for sale. Once I set up my lathe I'll be able to make these in stainless, but that might not be fore few months. Until then I can make the plated versions.

    I also made the ends on the hard lines quick connect.
    Last edited by r00b; 09-06-2022 at 03:50 PM.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC-Dave View Post
    Not to hi-jack my own thread, but while I was jumping the RPM relay for pressure testing, I noticed an oily film all over EVERYTHING in the relay/fuse compartment (and on the module side), is that...normal? Moisture protection?
    Maybe off-gassing from the battery right below?
    Todd, VIN 1561

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  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron View Post
    My understanding is that it works differently with copper -- With copper, how fast you quince it does not matter a lot.
    :
    And this is how you get into a jam.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaraSue View Post
    When I was reinstalling mine the first time I called up a DMCH franchise in a fit of frustration after going through several sets of washers and still getting leaks at max torque and the way I remember it, they told me tightening the bolts until the leaks stopped was fine as long as you didn't tighten them enough to break the bolt. When I do it I torque with a torque wrench first and then go over them with a regular ratcheting socket wrench and tighten them (gently) until a small amount of pressure doesn't turn them any more. So far, no issues I'm aware of. A buddy of mine talked to the same shop and they also told him they reuse crush washers all the time

    (When I first got the car I had some VOD work done by a local shop so maybe they screwed something up and that's why I have to overtighten them now, idk...)
    Once "righty tighty" becomes "righty loosey", you'll now at what point to stop.

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