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Thread: Pitted Y-Pipe at the O-Rings

  1. #11
    Senior Member DMC5180's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrJeff View Post
    So if a shop said they could fix my y-pipe with a belt sander... Would that be a good thing or a bad thing? I have to say I was expecting something like a milling machine.
    Not that a belt sander wouldn't work IF done properly. But you run the risk of Crowning the surfaces. Insist they do surface milling.
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  2. #12
    DMC Midwest - 815.459.6439 DMCMW Dave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC5180 View Post
    Not that a belt sander wouldn't work IF done properly. But you run the risk of Crowning the surfaces. Insist they do surface milling.
    It's really hard to get it straight with a belt sander, and if it isn't straight the agony of doing it all over is pretty high. Find another shop.
    Dave S
    DMC Midwest - retired but helping
    Greenville SC

  3. #13
    Senior Member Bitsyncmaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC5180 View Post
    Not that a belt sander wouldn't work IF done properly. But you run the risk of Crowning the surfaces. Insist they do surface milling.
    I agree. I even have a very large bench belt sander and would suspect the leading edge would crown a little using that.
    Dave M vin 03572
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bitsyncmaster View Post
    I agree. I even have a very large bench belt sander and would suspect the leading edge would crown a little using that.
    I would not hesitate to use a belt sander but a lot has to do with experience, how much materiel you are removing, and the equipment you are using. The part is difficult to hold properly in a milling machine and if not done properly it can be damaged that way too. Bottom line, the part may be salvagable but if it is very corroded it has to be considered unusable. If damaged by trying to save it by sanding you have lost nothing. Another possible solution could be welding and grinding it. At some point it can cost more to try repairing the part than replacing it. If you remove a LOT of materiel be careful the bolts are not so long as to bottom out before getting the joint tight. You might have to use washers or shorten the bolts. Even if you do not get it perfectly flat it is still worth a try. No biggie if it leaks, just test it BEFORE you put the intake manifold back on. Use some silicone on the "O" rings and Never-Seize on the bolts.
    David Teitelbaum

  5. #15
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    Again, I'd personally attempt the repair myself before spending money at a machine shop. However, I'd personally try filling the pits and sanding the excess filler down to the existing flat surface as opposed to just removing material. That way, if your attempted repair doesn't work, you still have the option of removing material. If you botch a straight material removal repair, then you don't have a second chance, are SOL, and will have to procure a new part.

    http://www.jbweld.com/product/j-b-highheat/



    http://www.alumaloy.com/


  6. #16
    Senior Member Bitsyncmaster's Avatar
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    That high heat epoxy looks interesting. Never saw that before. Looks like something I would try and anyone can do it.
    Dave M vin 03572
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  7. #17
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    I would hesitate using an epoxy. The heat may soften it enough to leak. Welding is the way to go.
    David Teitelbaum

  8. #18
    Senior Member SupercoolBill's Avatar
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    Just machined my Y-pipe to make it usable.

    Sent from my SM-F926U1 using Tapatalk

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